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40×10 Gooseneck Tiny House with a Big Bathroom by Liberation Tiny Homes


Check out this stunning new build by Liberation Tiny Homes. This 40×10 Gooseneck trailer gives you 400 square feet of living space, and it’s so well-maximized in this THOW.

The bathroom is by far the most ingenious part, since it has a separate toilet closet! You take the storage stairs up to the gooseneck bedroom, that has full standing room so you won’t feel cramped. It also has extra closet space up there for clothing.

Enjoy the tiny house tour below! And get an estimate for your own Liberation gooseneck here.

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Check Out the Bathroom in this Gooseneck Tiny House!

Wow look at this awesome living room with plenty of light.

Full farmhouse kitchen complete with a blanket ladder.

Past the barn door you find the bathroom with a hidden toilet closet, and the washer/dryer unit.

Here’s the private bathroom.

And a better look at the Subway tile shower.

The front door takes you into the kitchen.

Enjoy breakfast with a window view.

There are also French doors that lead into the living room.

The counters have a concrete overlay.

There’s full standing room in the gooseneck bedroom.

Here are some great built-in storage drawers in the bedroom.

Wow! Double vanity in the bathroom.

Could you live in this new tiny house?

Highlights:

  • Size: 40′ x 10′ x 13′ 6″
  • Roof: Galvalume metal – Charcoal
  • Siding: LP Smartside
  • Pella Windows and Pella mahogany French doors
  • Master bedroom with full standing room height in the gooseneck
  • Water: RV fresh water hose hookup
  • Heating & Cooling: (2) LG mini-split’s
  • Custom built cabinetry
  • Concrete overlay countertops
  • Custom storage throughout the home
  • Two entryway doors
  • Painted tongue and groove interior walls
  • Double Vanity
  • Private water closet inside the bathroom with the toilet for added privacy
  • Full size walk in shower with tile surround and niche

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Our big thanks to Marcus for sharing! 🙏

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributor for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She's a wife and mama of two little kids. She and her family just purchased a small fixer-upper and are starting a self-sufficient homestead on their happy little acre.
{ 11 comments… add one }
  • Avatar PMHTX
    August 31, 2020, 9:56 am

    Very interesting house but I can’t imagine it would be towable by anything other than a commercial truck. I am curious about some of the photos where the sliding barn door seems to be missing while in other pics the stair appear to be absent or are they just obscured?

    Anyway, nice looking and rather large house.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee
      August 31, 2020, 3:36 pm

      Yes I do think you’d need something big to tow this one. And I think they’re just obscured.

  • September 1, 2020, 3:02 pm

    Double bump outs I’m the living area would give room for a couch and loveseat to really make this space livable. If you are frequently moving around the country a RV is such a smarter choice. But if you are like me, looking for a home I could move with me if I needed to, then why not make it compatible with long term living.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee
      September 2, 2020, 1:35 pm

      So true, Beverly!

  • Avatar Paul Larsen
    September 1, 2020, 9:46 pm

    Looks great to me and a main floor bedroom too! Nice clean simple lines inside and out . As far as moving this or any other tiny house . I am certain there are companies that would do that , so you dont need a tow vehicle.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee
      September 2, 2020, 1:34 pm

      Yes that’s very true, Paul.

  • Avatar James D.
    September 3, 2020, 2:15 am

    @PMHTX – Door and stairs are just not in all of the shots… You wouldn’t see the barn door from inside the bathroom with the door open as it would be on the other side of the shower wall… While the stairs are to the left and from the main living space would have the shower wall in the way of viewing it… All the other shots of the bathroom were in other directions and not facing the direction the stairs are located…

    While this is big and heavy, it is the size of a Park Model, it’s likely not above 20,000 lbs with just those triple axles and that’s still well within the upper range of what’s towable with regular properly configured 3/4 or 1 ton truck…

    For example, the max gooseneck towing on the Silverado 3500HD and Ram HD is up to 35,500 pounds and 35,100 pounds, respectively… A “properly configured” Ford F-450 can deliver a diesel gooseneck towing maximum of up to 37,000 pounds… So you don’t have to go up to a commercial semi truck, just above any light duty trucks… Though, could be a issue if it was a regular tow behind trailer configuration as that is much harder to tow…

  • Avatar Michael
    December 31, 2020, 7:44 pm

    Indeed a huge THOW when you don’t move often but I guess it comes with a hefty price tag.
    Beside that you need a special permit to move it in most states.
    A gooseneck is the way to go if you want more space and avoiding a loft bedroom. I would choose this trailer type for everything longer than 20 ft. It makes towing much easier and saves overall length.
    The dining arrangement and the visible washer aren’t my thing but I love the windows and freedom to furnish a decent living area. However, I don’t see any blinds for privacy and curtains are making the interior optically smaller.

    • Avatar James D.
      December 31, 2020, 11:59 pm

      Actually, that’s a misconception, goosenecks have less space versus a regular trailer of the same length. Their only advantage is they are much easier and safer to tow.

      It’s actually the reduced space that makes them more likely to have a standing height space over the Gooseneck because there isn’t enough to split it and have something else share the vertical space but if you avoided splitting the space with anything that requires significant headroom then you can do the same for any THOW, especially, any that are 28′ long or longer that only require one bedroom space as that will usually prevent the need to compromise on space allocated to anything else in the living space.

      While there can be a lot that you won’t see until the owner moves into it, including blinds or curtains. For example, there’s no shower curtains either in the bathroom… Photos from the builder will only show how it gets delivered but that doesn’t mean nothing else will be done to it, especially as photos from the builder can be even for just a shell that the owner will be completing themselves. Often, the builder’s photos are staged, so even when it looks complete it isn’t what it will look like once the owner gets it and moves in…

      Location can also be a factor as a secluded or remote location already provides privacy…

      • Avatar Michael
        January 2, 2021, 1:56 am

        James, here we are again, your point of view isn’t automatic similar to others.
        A 20ft bumper pull trailer has definitely less interior room than a 20ft= 8ft gooseneck one.
        Do the math 20+8 is 28!. Headroom at goose is depending on the overall height of the trailer but for sure in most cases more than crawling spaces of a loft.
        Thank you for the lesson on privacy but I am not stupid and aware what manufacturers are doing when taking pics. This example shows living room with and without lounge chairs for example.

        • Avatar James D.
          January 2, 2021, 2:38 am

          Sorry but that’s not how it works, ignoring total length just because part of it isn’t all on same level is like ignoring when trailers get cantilevered and can be 2′ or 4′ or more longer than its base and we are talking about total space and that includes total footprint of what is actually considered the size of the home. Don’t confuse that with perception as even the trailer that’s cantilevered can still have more total space than the Gooseneck, especially as the cantilever can be the same height as the rest of the home for maximum vertical height space but a gooseneck never will be but a portion of that height…

          Additionally, not all goosenecks maximize the height and not all trucks will clear the bed or be easy to turn when they do, so you can still end up with a cramped loft in some of them too, as another reason why it’s a misconception that they automatically give more space…

          So, it’s really 28′ trailer compared to 28′ gooseneck, you get less space in the gooseneck because that’s the actual reality… While you may have already been aware of the other points, but fact remain you stated something that didn’t factor them when you stated you didn’t see any blinds… The washer is also only visible when the bathroom door is open and the alternative would have been having the door to the toilet visible instead, which is what is to the right of the washer…

          There’s a lot that can be nitpicked about any design but we all have to be careful for failing to factor things we could be missing because we don’t know the owner’s plans, and those factors can be far more significant than just missing furniture…

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