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Architect & Wife’s 193 Sq. Ft. Tiny House in Tokyo


This Japanese architect purchased a tiny plot of land in Tokyo and created this amazing tiny home for him and his wife. It’s 18 square meters (around 200 square feet) large, and despite the tiny size, the architect says they aren’t living “minimally.” He made space for a large fridge for his wife, as well as for his 300 books and their 300 vinyl records!

The unique roofline is what really makes this tiny house stand out. There are two different skylights at alternating heights that allow beams of light to shine in throughout the day. The best part? This adorable couple seem absolutely in love!

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They fit 300 Vinyls & 300 Books in Their Tiny House

Here’s the architect and the plot of land he bought.

Their kitchen takes up a large part of the home.

The big front window lets in lots of light.

How cool are these skylights?

And here’s the layout!

VIDEO:The 18㎡ House of a Japanese Couple in the Heart of Tokyo

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributor for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She's a wife, and mama of three little kids. She and her family are homesteaders with sheep, goats, chickens, ducks and quail on their happy little acre.

Latest posts by Natalie C. McKee (see all)

{ 11 comments… add one }
  • Marsha Cowan
    December 13, 2021, 4:45 pm

    Wow! Pretty amazing architecture. Great use of a tiny space, and intriguing, natural finishes. Lovely home : )

  • Knox
    December 14, 2021, 2:02 am

    Such a beautiful home made more so by the delightful couple enjoying the most important things of all; music, awareness and appreciation of each moment and a great love for each other and the natural world around them! Beautiful! 🕊✨🕊

  • Alan Castle
    December 14, 2021, 10:02 am

    I really appreciate the creativity and ingenuity of architects when faced with a challenge how they are able to think “outside the box” You tube is a great source of thought provoking videos. Keep up the good work! Alan

  • vee
    December 14, 2021, 11:59 am

    Stunning! Everything they need for a happy life. Love the architecture — Love their priorities and for me, the tub on the patio is marvellous!!!

    • Natalie C. McKee
      December 15, 2021, 1:16 pm

      It’s great to see that they put in what mattered to them! Books, vinyls, a tub and a big fridge.

  • Theresa Perdue
    December 14, 2021, 4:14 pm

    Comfortable bed ✅ large shower and a bathtub ✅ large fridge and sink ✅ yep it checks all the boxes for me. I could live there quite comfortably.

    • Natalie C. McKee
      December 15, 2021, 1:14 pm

      Totally agree! I mean, once the kids are grown haha.

  • Annette
    December 14, 2021, 8:26 pm

    Wow! This is lovely. Thanks for sharing.

  • Eric
    December 15, 2021, 1:15 am

    Unfinished concrete not only looks ugly but allows water to erode its integrity. But if they are happy with good luck to them.

    What many people dont realise is that baths are for soaking in AFTER showering. Japanese would never use it for bathing themselves.

    • James D.
      December 15, 2021, 11:10 am

      Well, remember beauty is in the eye of the beholder… The industrial look isn’t for everyone but it does appeal to certain people who do like it a lot…

      While it depends on the type of concrete on how long it’ll last when exposed to the elements. There’s concrete structures that have lasted for centuries, even underwater, for example. Besides, it’s only mainly exposed on the interior, except the bathing area, where it otherwise doesn’t have to handle much and concrete can be repaired, etc. Also, the unfinished look doesn’t mean there’s no sealant or treatment applied to the concrete. It just means there will be regular maintenance periods where the sealant, etc. is re-applied…

      Though, another factor is houses in Japan tend to be torn down every 30 years or so to make way for new construction. The next generation/owner may completely change it and as continued property divisions may make the lot increasingly smaller or split it up so a different shape structure may be required for the space later. So not everything needs to last multiple generations…

  • jerry dycus
    December 19, 2021, 5:53 am

    Japan’s population is shrinking rapidly so family land division is not a problem it use to be.
    Japan really needs to move people out of the cities and repopulate the countryside where a lot of homes, buildings sit empty and the old people need people to care for them.
    Women there just don’t want to marry, have babies with the far right men enough and too racist to allow immigration longer than 10 yrs, recently upped from 5 yrs but need the workers too much, then sent home.
    The problem I see with this and many THs is a lack of comfortable seating. A flat dinette seat is just not good enough.

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