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753 Sq. Ft. Mønhuset Longhouse Small Home Design


While going tiny is great, sometimes just downsizing works better for families. This family chose a lovely Mønhuset Longhouse, which includes two bedrooms and 753 sq. ft. of living space.

The main living area is connected to the bedrooms via a breezeway, that can be closed off in inclement weather. There’s also a little office/shed area on the property. Mønhuset — a Scandinavian company — has now opened in Canada offering homes as modular, prefabricated panels or as site built and can be customized as per client wants and needs. Awesome!

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Two-Bedroom Scandinavian-Style Small Home

moenhuset longhouse 4

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

This one was built in a beautiful clearing.

moenhuset longhouse 6

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

Walls of windows line one side of the home.

moenhuset longhouse 8

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

The kitchen has its own separate space.

moenhuset longhouse 7

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

There’s a loft for extra sleeping space.

moenhuset longhouse 10

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

View from the loft. Love the wood-burning stove.

moenhuset longhouse 3

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

Here’s a look at the breezeway.

moenhuset longhouse 11

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

There’s also an additional shed/workspace.

moenhuset longhouse 5

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

This is the layout.

moenhuset longhouse 2

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

Another view of the kitchen.

moenhuset longhouse

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

I’d definitely want the location, too!

moenhuset longhouse 9

Images via Mønhuset-Canada

Details:

  • Two bedrooms
  • Kitchen and dining room
  • Spacious living room
  • Lots of windows
  • Breezeway to bedrooms
  • Extra storage room

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Our big thanks to William for sharing! 🙏

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributor for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She's a wife, and mama of three little kids. She and her family are homesteaders with sheep, goats, chickens, ducks and quail on their happy little acre.
{ 10 comments… add one }
  • Bryan O'Connor
    November 26, 2021, 8:36 am

    Love the lay out but I just don’t get all the windows, not just with this one but period.

    • David Pedersen
      November 27, 2021, 4:05 pm

      In Denmark we use low energy windows consisting of three layers of glass with argon or krypton gas between the layers. This results in less heat escaping, from the sun’s heating, than enters the room. Even in winter, when the sun is shining. At the same time we use a lot of insulation. Hence the large windows plus the thick insulation makes houses less reliable of artificial heating. They become more passive solar heated. And it is nice to bring nature “into” the house. They most often can open all the way up, which is nice in summer. We do not use air conditioning. The thick insulation prevents the heat from making the house too hot in summer.

      • Bryan O'Connor
        November 27, 2021, 6:38 pm

        I didn’t mean the energy or the heat, I’m talking about in general. I just don’t get the want for wall to windows period, the last thing I want is anyone and everyone seeing me in my own house.

    • James D.
      November 28, 2021, 2:52 am

      Well, there’s no one to look at you where it’s located and that makes the bigger question why have a home surrounded by nature if you don’t want to look at it?

      Add, some climates lack of sun and natural light can be downright unhealthy if you compound it by staying in dark enclosed spaces… Along with other reasons it could actually be a good idea to consider windows, even if you ignore the energy or heat benefits…

      Besides, you can always modify the windows so you can look out but no one can look in except at night and then just close the curtains… Or get smart windows that can turn opaque at a push of a button… Or actual one way mirror windows…

      • Bryan O'Connor
        November 28, 2021, 6:43 am

        I’m not saying no to windows, I just don’t get a wall of windows, you can not tell me that those windows are as energy efficient as a wall insulated with spray foam and is completely sealed up, because if you because that I have some beach front property in New Mexico that I’ll sell you cheap. Yes nature is great but unless your 50 miles from the nearest town someone is going to see more important see IN your house, I’m not about all that, I like my privacy. As a Prepper my #1 is for noone to know anything about my home, where I live and what I have. Whether you all want to admit it or not people who live in cabins like this off the grid and off the and on homesteads that are self sufficient are Preppers and the #1 rule is to not be found. When you have a wall of windows your going to be found.

        • James D.
          November 28, 2021, 12:31 pm

          Well, David already pointed out the energy efficiency. Insulation is nice but all it does is slow down the transfer of heat and eventually you’ll still need a way to heat/cool the space to have actual control… That’s where the windows can play a role by taking advantage of the sun to do that part naturally… Along with benefits of lots of natural light and helping the space feel bigger and less stressful…

          Basically, keep in mind everything that goes into a structure contributes to not only how it looks but also how it functions. Multiple aspects of which essentially work together like an ecosystem…

          While I already pointed out all your concerns can be addressed… Besides, most people who just want a healthy home and enjoy nature aren’t preppers… YMMV…

  • Paula B
    November 26, 2021, 3:14 pm

    Horrible layout, can’t imagine going through the breezeway in the middle of the night to use the bathroom, especially in the winter.
    Living area is very Spartan, doesn’t look inviting. Might be ok as an AB&B but not livable. At least for me.

    • David Pedersen
      November 27, 2021, 4:07 pm

      It is actually a summerhouse.

    • Bryan O'Connor
      November 28, 2021, 6:49 am

      This is a summer house but I could live here year round if it weren’t for all the windows. I like the breezeway, it gives you somewhere to to put your fire wood and get and keep it dry. I’d much rather have a breezeway to walk out onto than go trapsing through 4 foot of snow to get firewood and have it drying in my house before I burn it.

  • Alison
    November 27, 2021, 5:08 pm

    I like the plan, for a summer house. Kids might want to sleep outdoors, and they would have equal easy access to the bathroom.

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