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Freedom Yurt/Cabin Combo

What happens when you combine the shape and size of a yurt home with the durability and sturdiness of a cabin? You get these innovative Freedom Yurt-Cabins, which have many of the benefits of a cabin at a reduction of the cost.

Ranging from about $12,000 to $17,000—which the manufacturing company points out can be even cheaper than purchasing a traditional, fabric-walled yurt—Freedom Yurt-Cabins come in three different sizes ranging from 217 square feet to 387 square feet. The yurt-cabins also contain insulation in the walls and roof, windows, and an awning over the door to the structure.

What is particularly interesting about these yurt-cabins is that they can be customized to fit your needs and wants. Aside from size, you can purchase additional features such as an extra window, a tinted dome, and a fan mount. Because the structures are made of finished wood, you can also paint the yurt-cabin however you like.

Freedom Yurt/Cabin Combo

Yurt Home Cabin Exterior

Images © Freedom Yurt-Cabins/Joel Gray

Yurt Home Cabin Exterior 2

Yurt Home Cabin Exterior 3

lets-tidy

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Freedom Yurt Cabins Pricing

Images © Freedom Yurt-Cabins/Joel Gray

The manufacturers of the Freedom Yurt-Cabins also mention that assembling these yurt-cabins is even easier than assembling a traditional yurt, which can be time-consuming because of the platform the yurt must sit upon.

Furthermore, the yurt-cabin’s “energy efficient” structure, with its insulated parts and double-paned windows, was designed with the environmentally conscious person in mind.

For a sturdily-built, intricately-designed, visually attractive alternative to the traditional yurt home, look no further than the Freedom Yurt-Cabin.

Learn More: http://freedomyurtcabins.com

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Sabrena

Sabrena

Sabrena is a writer and blogger from Los Angeles, California and Tiny House Talk is excited to have her as part of the team to help us share more inspiring tiny homes and simple living stories with you.




{ 18 comments… add one }
  • M June 26, 2015, 11:06 am

    I like!

  • Shirley June 26, 2015, 4:04 pm

    I had not been that impressed with the Yurts until I looked at these. The quality is awesome. I am disabled and living in tiny house is perfect for me because do not have to have major upkeep on larger home. Plus less walking to movefrom space to space. I really need bed on main level instead of loft, so it all is just falling into place that tiny home or yurt would be answer to my prayers. My only problem is that I am not physically able to help with the building of house. And of course, not sure about building codes and need to find land. But I know this is the future for many. I really do not need a large house. Just cozy and mine!

  • signalfire June 26, 2015, 4:28 pm

    Nice! It gets rid of that awful feeling that you’re stuck inside a giant baby-gate… :)

    • Freedom Yurt Cabins June 26, 2015, 10:16 pm

      That was one of the main design flaws we saw in traditional Yurts. Our tongue and groove style roof and Lodgepole Pine rafters are much more appealing on the eyes!

  • Bob Boxberger June 26, 2015, 6:30 pm

    Cloth roof: not good. Mongol felts better, but probably double the cost.

    • Freedom Yurt Cabins June 26, 2015, 10:13 pm

      Bob, the roof material is actually a Durolast Vinyl Membrane. It is a commercial grade roof material that is used on many industrial buildings and has a 10 year warranty. It is UV absorbent and takes only minutes to change once it is worn.

  • Karen R June 26, 2015, 9:36 pm

    Really nice! How long does the fabric last?

  • Rue June 27, 2015, 1:00 am

    Apparently they’re portable, too; the site claims they can be removed and relocated.

    I still think round spaces don’t lend themselves very well to our mostly-rectangular furniture, though I suppose these would be more for seasonal or recreational use than for full-time living.

  • Susanne July 3, 2015, 1:18 am

    Lovely!!!!

  • Da Knights July 22, 2015, 5:47 am

    Hello, i really like these. What kind of cold temps will they stand up to? Send my pictures of one with heat ( wood stove ) Also didn’t see pics of any type of kitchen? ….Thanks for responce….Da Knights

  • James Bagley January 27, 2016, 11:16 am

    No mention of wood or pellet stove adaptations, Is that a possibility such as it is in most fabric manufacturers?

  • Nancy February 6, 2016, 11:24 am

    Can it be customized? As in more windows.

  • Diana February 6, 2016, 2:50 pm

    These prices are obsolete. They start around $15 or $16k now. I have the smallest one I will sell for $14k if anyone is interested.
    Sasiangel1 @gmail.com

  • Michael February 6, 2016, 8:00 pm

    I have been always thinking about getting one but the ‘tent feeling’ avoided that. However, this one is a decent option. Hard sided walls, solid insulated roof and the included base are for sure more comfortable and cooler for living. The rounded shape requires less walls than a comparable rectangular or square building and withstand hurricane force winds much better.
    I am wondering how to put wiring as they are offering an ceiling fan.
    Beside that I would like to know how if there are additional wall panels available to put a bathroom into the 16′ model. Plumbing would be another question.
    The good thing is that you can take it with you when you wanna move.

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