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200 Sq. Ft. Grove Cottage on Hobby Farm


In Wellsville, Utah sits a little hobby farm with gardens, sheep, chickens, pigs, and an orchard. Back among the young trees is this little off-grid Grove Cottage, which you can rent on Airbnb!

It has a covered porch with an idyllic porch swing, and inside you’ll find sleeping for up to 6 between a King-sized bed, queen sleeper sofa, and loft for kids. Keep warm with the wood stove, or roast s’mores over the fire outside. There’s no kitchen or indoor plumbing, but you’ll find a composting toilet, outdoor shower and washing station on the side of the house.

You can also cook up burgers on the grill, and store drinks in the complementary cooler. Enjoy the photo tour of this lovely spot below.

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Idyllic Grove Cottage with Mountain Views, Utah

There’s a lovely porch swing with pasture views.

Breathtaking views all around!

Inside the studio-style cabin. Wood burning stove!

The sleeper sofa and a magazine ladder.

Now it’s a queen-size bed!

There’s a king-sized bed in the other corner

The loft with room for a couple sleeping bags.

Outside is the composting toilet (emptied daily).

Outdoor hand-washing station.

View of the outhouse and shower area.

Inside the outdoor shower (available in warmer months only)

Private and comfortable!

Welcome to your cottage vacation!

Here’s a view of the surrounding grounds.

Highlights:

  • 200 square foot cabin
  • 100 square foot loft bedroom
  • Composting toilet
  • Outdoor shower
  • Off-grid
  • Wood stove & Fire Pit
  • King-sized bed
  • Queen sleeper sofa
  • Loft area for kids
  • No wifi/HVAC/kitchen/indoor plumbing
  • Grill outside and cooler available

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Our big thanks to Jenn for sharing! 🙏

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributor for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She's a wife and mama of two little kids. She and her family just purchased a small fixer-upper and are starting a self-sufficient homestead on their happy little acre.
Natalie C. McKee

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{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Avatar Donna Rae
    August 20, 2020, 5:50 pm

    It’s kinda cute but goodness, with just a few changes, it could have been even nicer. First and foremost, putting a small add-on at the back to accommodate having the shower and toilet indoors would make it much more appealing for more of the year. It seems to me that there is a loss of revenue…not to mention comfort…because they didn’t make that investment. I personally think that they could have used some upgraded materials but I also know that budget can put restraints on that. Framing that stone work on the front of the house could go away. Just have the stones with maybe a nice piece of wood across the top and it would look like everyone’s favorite river rock fireplace kind of finish. Make a small patio out of stones or wood for the BBQ and a few chairs for relaxing outside and that would be a huge improvement, too. It sleeps a lot of people for such a small place and holy moly, the view is to die for! If the price is right, it will attract a lot of visitors and with a few improvements and upgrades, even more will come! Make it usable for more seasons and the income it could produce would be greatly enhanced.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee
      August 21, 2020, 1:05 pm

      Yes those are some great thoughts, Donna.

  • Avatar James D.
    August 22, 2020, 2:47 am

    @Donna Rae – Something to keep in mind, depending where the property is located, is that there are often reasons why people may be inclined to want to avoid putting the kitchen and bathroom in the same structure or put in standard versions…

    Normally, if you can build a structure under a certain minimum sq ft of usually 200 Sq Ft or less, again depending on location what that limit will be, then you can usually be exempt from needing building permits, inspections, impact fees, etc. Since, most municipalities, there are rare exceptions, don’t usually enforce regulations on what can generically be considered sheds, regardless of how you’re actually using it, which can significantly keep costs much lower than they otherwise would be…

    However, many municipalities have it that is only if the structure doesn’t have any plumbing, or namely a fully functional kitchen and bathroom that are internal parts of the structure.

    Some areas can also limit how many kitchens can be on a single property, which could be a issue if there’s a main structure/home and this is the addition, if the property zoning only allows for one… It’s one of the reasons some are trying to get rid of single family zoning, for example… Among other examples of issues people can be facing in what they have to deal with in their location, like triggering the need for permits may also mean dealing with minimum sq ft requirements that may exclude anything this size…

    So keep in mind things are sometimes done to get around such issues…

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