≡ Menu

1969 Double-Decker School Bus Conversion for $18K


This post contains affiliate links.

This incredible double-decker school bus conversion has been in progress for 20 years but is looking for a new owner. While it still drives, it’s designed to stay stationary once it travels from Rainier, Washington to a new home.

The bus home has a kitchen, bathroom, and space for a King-sized bed on the second level. There are lots of details about the features and the backstory listed after the photos below! The owner is asking $18,000. Learn more below and let us know your thoughts in the comments!

Don’t miss other awesome buses like this, join our FREE Tiny House Newsletter for more interesting tiny homes like this! 

Double Decker DIY Skoolie 20 Years in the Making Available for $18K in Rainier, Washington

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 20

Images via D Frankly

The navy blue paint looks awesome.

Nicknamed Honaly by previous owners who traveled the Grateful Dead circuit in the 80’s-90’s has only 157,500 original miles and now UP FOR SALE!

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 25

Images via D Frankly

Beautiful shaker-style cabinets in the kitchen.

Located in Rainier, WA it travels at 70 mph on the hiway with ease.

I’ve been building and converting it for over 20 years, lived in it a total of 9 years.

I used to repair RV’s and became quite disgruntlled over the skimpy construction, proclivity to leak and difficulty in making even minor repairs. I began to study school bus structures and as a sheetmetal fabricator in the U.S. Air Force, I decided to take a gander at performing my own school bus conversion in 2001.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 16

Images via D Frankly

There’s some plumbing still necessary.

As well, I have been a carpenter since being trained by my father as a kid and truly enjoyed working on multi-million dollar homes where I was allowed creative input in design/construction. I have enjoyed every step of the journey transforming this bus as it has required innovation, creative processes and definitely thinking “out of the box”.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 10

Images via D Frankly

The bus is wired for a refrigerator, but the current owner uses a DC-powered cooler.

Painting and renovating the exterior began in 2001 in a ‘bus barn’ that allowed cover. In 2003 I missed my king size bed and decided to add a 2nd story to accomodate the bed and the real journey began then. I was living in the bus in a wooded, mountainous area where I was afforded free, peaceful time to construct and design on my time off from working on other people’s homes.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 12

Images via D Frankly

Here we are upstairs.

I befriended the owner of a sheetmetal business who excelled in creative designing. With his help, he allowed me to barter the roof of the 2nd story curved perlings and joists (which can be dropped down during transport if preferred) for a large stone/tile install in his home. Architects and engineers were highly impressed with the construction as it was well thought out and light in construction. The roof is constructed with SS, heavy-guage aluminum and bullet-proof lexan. It has never leaked and the exterior is sleak with no extrusion to catch branches, etc. Snow just slides off the roof. There is a submarine window in the front cabover section along with a skylight that swings open to allow roof access.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 15

Images via D Frankly

A skylight is a fun addition.

In 2003, the bus was moved to Elma, WA where it resided in an airplane hangar while constructing the roof. It was then relocated to Rainier WA in 2004 after we completed building a new ‘bus barn’ that would accomodate the full 14’9″ we would need to finalize sealing the roof and to add cedar shingles/paint the exterior walls on the 2nd story. At this time, the stove pipe access was created and I fiberglassed the cabover portion of the front roof.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 9

Images via D Frankly

Here’s a look at the bathroom.

I finally completed the major portions required for ‘living’ in the bus and permanently moved in in 2015. By living in it I was able to make further accomodations to allow comfort and further usability of appliances and lighting as well as adding pertinent electrical connections.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 8

Images via D Frankly

A progress picture of the upstairs.

The floor is covered in 2′ wool carpet squares to allow easy removal/replacement if and when necessary. There is running water via RV inlet port. Hot water is on demand via instant electric hot water heater under the sink. Propane stove also has fan hood in the shape of a copper sink provided to me as a gift. It is wired for a refrigerator although I use a DC powered cooler for my needs. There is a built-in compartment I use as a freezer when it’s below 32 degrees outside.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 7

Images via D Frankly

The roof seal should hold for another decade.

The clawfoot tub hasn’t been hooked up to water yet (but all plumbing exists) as I refused to do this until the bus was permanently set up in a nice location. The woodstove is more than ample and I always had something cooking on it or was heating water for tea or aromatherapy oils. The steel shelf above the wood stove always saw sourdough rising, kindling being heated for the stove or drying rain soaked gloves and hats.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 6

Images via D Frankly

The couch adds additional sleeping area.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 5

Images via D Frankly

A wood stove to keep you cozy!

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 4

Images via D Frankly

Here’s what the bus looked like nearly 20 years ago.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 2

Images via D Frankly

Another look upstairs.

1969 Converted 2-story school bus. International Loadstar 33′ rolling home. 24

Images via D Frankly

Full Description:

Nicknamed Honaly by previous owners who traveled the Grateful Dead circuit in the 80’s-90’s has only 157,500 original miles and now UP FOR SALE!

Located in Rainier, WA it travels at 70 mph on the hiway with ease.

I’ve been building and converting it for over 20 years, lived in it a total of 9 years.

I used to repair RV’s and became quite disgruntlled over the skimpy construction, proclivity to leak and difficulty in making even minor repairs. I began to study school bus structures and as a sheetmetal fabricator in the U.S. Air Force, I decided to take a gander at performing my own school bus conversion in 2001.

As well, I have been a carpenter since being trained by my father as a kid and truly enjoyed working on multi-million dollar homes where I was allowed creative input in design/construction. I have enjoyed every step of the journey transforming this bus as it has required innovation, creative processes and definitely thinking “out of the box”.

Painting and renovating the exterior began in 2001 in a ‘bus barn’ that allowed cover. In 2003 I missed my king size bed and decided to add a 2nd story to accomodate the bed and the real journey began then. I was living in the bus in a wooded, mountainous area where I was afforded free, peaceful time to construct and design on my time off from working on other people’s homes.

I befriended the owner of a sheetmetal business who excelled in creative designing. With his help, he allowed me to barter the roof of the 2nd story curved perlings and joists (which can be dropped down during transport if preferred) for a large stone/tile install in his home. Architects and engineers were highly impressed with the construction as it was well thought out and light in construction. The roof is constructed with SS, heavy-guage aluminum and bullet-proof lexan. It has never leaked and the exterior is sleak with no extrusion to catch branches, etc. Snow just slides off the roof. There is a submarine window in the front cabover section along with a skylight that swings open to allow roof access.

In 2003, the bus was moved to Elma, WA where it resided in an airplane hangar while constructing the roof. It was then relocated to Rainier WA in 2004 after we completed building a new ‘bus barn’ that would accomodate the full 14’9″ we would need to finalize sealing the roof and to add cedar shingles/paint the exterior walls on the 2nd story. At this time, the stove pipe access was created and I fiberglassed the cabover portion of the front roof.

I finally completed the major portions required for ‘living’ in the bus and permanently moved in in 2015. By living in it I was able to make further accomodations to allow comfort and further usability of appliances and lighting as well as adding pertinent electrical connections.

The floor is covered in 2′ wool carpet squares to allow easy removal/replacement if and when necessary. There is running water via RV inlet port. Hot water is on demand via instant electric hot water heater under the sink. Propane stove also has fan hood in the shape of a copper sink provided to me as a gift. It is wired for a refrigerator although I use a DC powered cooler for my needs. There is a built-in compartment I use as a freezer when it’s below 32 degrees outside.

The clawfoot tub hasn’t been hooked up to water yet (but all plumbing exists) as I refused to do this until the bus was permanently set up in a nice location. The woodstove is more than ample and I always had something cooking on it or was heating water for tea or aromatherapy oils. The steel shelf above the wood stove always saw sourdough rising, kindling being heated for the stove or drying rain soaked gloves and hats.

Highlights

  • A 1969 double-decker school bus has been converted into a 2-story rolling home and is available for sale in Rainier, Washington for $18,000.
  • The bus has been in progress for 20 years and was designed to stay stationary after traveling to its new home.
  • The second story features a kitchen, bathroom, and space for a King-sized bed.
  • The bus has a navy blue paint job and was nicknamed “Honaly” by previous owners who traveled the Grateful Dead circuit in the 80s-90s.
  • The owner, a skilled sheetmetal fabricator and carpenter, has put a lot of creative effort into the conversion, resulting in innovative features and sturdy construction.
  • The exterior was painted and renovated in 2001, and in 2003, a second story was added to accommodate the bed.
  • The roof of the second story is made of SS, heavy-gauge aluminum, and bullet-proof lexan, ensuring no leaks and easy snow shedding.
  • The bus has been lived in since 2015, with running water, hot water on demand, a propane stove with a copper sink fan hood, and a wood stove for heating and cooking.
  • The bus is wired for a refrigerator, but the current owner uses a DC powered cooler.
  • The bus also features a clawfoot tub, though it hasn’t been hooked up to water yet.
  • The floor is covered in 2′ wool carpet squares for easy removal and replacement.
  • The bus is listed for sale on Craigslist and other websites.

Learn more:

Related Stories:

You can share this using the e-mail and social media re-share buttons below. Thanks!

If you enjoyed this you’ll LOVE our Free Daily Tiny House Newsletter with even more!

You can also join our Small House Newsletter!

Also, try our Tiny Houses For Sale Newsletter! Thank you!

More Like This: Bus Conversions | Skoolies | Vacations | Tiny House For Sale

See The Latest: Go Back Home to See Our Latest Tiny Houses

This post contains affiliate links.

The following two tabs change content below.

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributor for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She's a wife, and mama of three little kids. She and her family are homesteaders with sheep, goats, chickens, ducks and quail on their happy little acre.

Latest posts by Natalie C. McKee (see all)

{ 2 comments… add one }
  • ronn
    July 28, 2023, 5:40 am

    sorry, that aint no double decker bus!

    cant even look at that thing straight!

    • James D.
      July 28, 2023, 4:28 pm

      It’s two levels and it’s a bus, which means by definition it is a double decker bus.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.