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Roost 36: The Family-Friendly THOW by Perch & Nest

This is the Roost 36, a family-friendly THOW built by Perch & Nest in North Carolina.


This is the company’s latest build that debuted at the Tiny House NC Street Festival in April. It’s now the official showroom for Perch & Nest and, wow, is it gorgeous. You can can check out events where you can tour the Roost 36 here.

Perhaps it’s coolest feature? The screened-in porch with retractable screen doors! Take the video tour to get all the details and enjoy the images below.

Interested in a Perch & Nest THOW? Their contact information is on the last page.

Related: Siesta Key Beach THOW by Modern Tiny Living

Roost 36: The Family-Friendly THOW by Perch & Nest

Stunning built-in shelving makes use of all available wall space.

Look at all the light coming from those skylights!

The mint-green SMEG. Be still my heart!

Quaint cottage feel in this master bedroom loft.


Children/guest loft with a great porthole window.

Love the painted horse-trough tub. I need one!

Related: The Boho Home

Video: Tiny House Tour: Roost36 by Perch & Nest

Love this tiny house? Want one like it? Get in touch with Perch & Nest on their website.

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.




{ 21 comments… add one }
  • Tom Osterdock May 22, 2017, 12:47 pm

    This house has some very nice features. I do like the screened in porch, very nice and the folding main door to open to the world is great.

  • Sondra May 22, 2017, 2:48 pm

    Beautiful, love everything about it, but not gonna lie, that porch looks unstable to drive with and looks like it would snap off.

    • Eric May 24, 2017, 4:52 pm

      What looks, and what is, are usually 2 very different things. However, I’d have made the porch as a fold away item that gets reassembled on site. That way the “house” could be made longer, thereby more usable/spacious and still providing the benefits of a decent size porch.

      Personally, I’m waiting for someone to come up with a vertically extending roof line for having a standable/walkable space in loft bedrooms as opposed to the currently crouchable/kneeable spaces that we see. I don’t do crouching very well in my advancing years.

      • Tom Osterdock May 24, 2017, 9:20 pm

        Eric, I agree totally with you. That is why my giant tiny is going to have standable space in the loft BR. I am 5-8 so I am putting 7ft in the kitchen and bathroom and the loft upstairs. Of coarse the traveling limitations mean only 13.5 on the road and 8.5 wide. So My kitchen is 8x12x7 bathroom 8x6x7 loft 8x18x7 and the livingroom is 12x16x7 with a 8×12 deck on top. Loft will expand up when parked and livingroom walls will expand out and the deck the ceiling is the sky is the limit.

        • Bruce May 26, 2017, 6:11 pm

          Tom, is your home currently under construction? If I understand correctly, you are expanding the home both vertically & horizontally? I was wondering what methods you will be employing to accomplish this. Horizontal axis – are you using an RV type slide out? Vertically – what method of powering up & down, pneumatic, hydraulic, or mechanical?
          I’ve given a lot of thought to expansion both vertically & horizontally & I’d love to see what you have. Any pics, blog, or whatnot? Love to see it!

        • Tom Osterdock May 27, 2017, 10:21 pm

          Bruce not yet. we are still in the planning stages since I do not have the funds to build yet. I am starting early to figure out what we want to do. I gave my desires to my engineering team and architect today. They are swamped at the moment but I am not in a hurry. I plan on doing this when my mom passes away and she is just 97 years old, still kicking strong. But unfortunately we all do not last forever. I have shown them the Hydraulic options and my mechanical options for the verticle and two horzontal expansions. The living room will expand on each side for about 4 ft depending on how it is done. Mechanical could be up to 6 ft on each side since I would be folding down the floor then raising up the roof and sliding out the walls and setting up supports on the walls then bringing the roof down and bolting all together for support. I plan on steel framing thruout the tiny except for here might be SIPs for lightness and then I will have to increase my strength of the Sips due to the folding portion of the SIPs. For the loft I planned to raise walls and roof up with insulating connections from the two halfs if I did hydraulic that way. The other thought is to raise the roof and fold the walls with windows down and then lock into position and tightened for storms. This wall also has a door for access to the outside deck on the roof. I did not mention before but have thought of putting a wooden bathtub in the loft for my lady and myself. It can be relaxing to take a nice warm bath and dry off and into bed. Bathroom will only have a shower and other facilities no tub. My thoughts at the moment. I had the insulating ideas on my drawings for the architect and we will see what he comes up with. I want a door in one of the sides and allowance for that in the other side if wanted later, you know a back door. The roof deck will have an evacuation ladder for emergencies if needed.

  • Slim Pickins May 22, 2017, 3:53 pm

    Needs a stove with an oven! What appears to be a stove top to the left of the mint green fridge is way too close to the fridge, unless you happen to be left handed! Otherwise, an AWESOME tiny house!!

    • Phatkhat May 23, 2017, 1:19 pm

      Agree with Slim about the cooktop being too close to the fridge. Huge design flaw. And such a huge fridge with no oven! Unless you just want to stow LOTS of beverages. It’s pretty, but a lot of wasted space, IMO. And I’d hate to see the price tag, LOL. I’ve seen lots better THOWs. Do like the bathtub, though. There’s an idea for my (non-tiny) house we’re renovating!

  • Tom Osterdock May 22, 2017, 4:46 pm

    I like the screened porch but yea it does look unstable but the trailer frame is heavy steel so it will not snap off and the folding doors are fantastic. The stove would have to be changed, I agree. I like a little larger kitchen myself.

  • Michael May 22, 2017, 8:54 pm

    I love the screened porch although its space consuming but can be used for motor or bicycles when under way. With some changes for my use it would make a nice THOW.
    Firstly, I would eliminate the lofts and the dormers at the front. Doing so you get a straight roofline and more interior air which is essential in a tropical climate.
    Secondly, I would put a downstairs bedroom where the kids bed and the stairs are.
    Thirdly, I would put a walk through bathroom to gain more kitchen space
    by eliminating space consuming hallway.
    As often the kitchen isn’t designed according to work flow., which is briefly; dry and fridge storage, sink and stove. For left handlers from right to left and for right handlers contrawise.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 23, 2017, 1:16 pm

      I’ve never heard of that kitchen work flow design. Sounds brilliant!

      • James D. May 24, 2017, 12:30 am

        It’s called the Kitchen work triangle… The idea is that for a kitchen design to be optimally efficient then the three most used/accessed parts of the kitchen have to be close but not too close to each other with an easy flow between those three points to minimize wasted steps…

        Namely the sink, the fridge, and the cooking range/oven are the three key points… Everything else is flexible but it helps if that work flow is kept in mind throughout, and this is one of the reasons why some prefer Galley style kitchen layouts as it prioritizes this work flow style.

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 24, 2017, 1:38 pm

          It sounds great 🙂 I don’t think any of the kitchens I’ve had have maximized this triangle!

        • Tom Osterdock May 24, 2017, 3:26 pm

          Natalie, normal house design always takes that into consideration unless it is not designed by a professional. I’m not a professional but know of this and have used it in my house design.

  • Dawn May 24, 2017, 11:28 am

    It is nice but I really didn’t see any storage or very much of it. There’s no table to eat at. There is no washer dryer. There’s hardly any kitchen storage. There’s a lot of nice ideas but it needs a lot of changes.

  • Kid Cardona May 26, 2017, 12:46 pm

    I like this layout and design. The kitchen does need better layout. For me I would move the sink to the corner and add a stove with oven on the end and take it away from next to the fridge. Other then that this house looks great. I wonder what the Price is?

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 26, 2017, 2:37 pm

      That’s a great idea, Kid! I’m sure you can contact Perch & Nest and see what they could make one for.

  • Stephanie May 30, 2017, 2:10 pm

    It’s very nice but I don’t see how it would work for a family of 4. The second loft could only be reached by an older child and there really isn’t enough room for 2 there. The kitchen is also inadequate for family cooking and while the shelves are nice they aren’t practical for storing clothes, shoes, and all the other stuff you need for daily living.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 31, 2017, 9:35 am

      It would be snug, for sure! I’m not sure I could do it 🙂

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