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280 Sq. Ft. Modern Houseboat Cabin

This is a 280 sq. ft. modern houseboat cabin called the DublDom26 which is used as a suite for a hotel in the area on the Volga River.

It’s a prefabricated tiny home from a builder near Moscow, Russia.

When you go inside, you’ll find a living area, dining kitchenette, bathroom, and a bedroom.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

280 Sq. Ft. Modern Houseboat Cabin

280 Sq. Ft. Modern Houseboat Cabin

Images © DublDom and Hotel-Paluba

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SEE ALSO: Cozy Houseboat in Queens, New York

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SEE ALSO: 42′ Metroship Houseboat

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Images © DublDom and Hotel-Paluba

Learn more: http://www.dubldom.ru/franchise-eng.htm


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Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Nancy M. November 10, 2015, 11:25 am

    love it! Could definitely live there full-time, if I added clothes/craft storage!

  • Liz November 10, 2015, 11:34 am

    Boy, I wish I had the imagination and ability to design/decorate a houseboat like this!! What a way to live!!

  • Kim W November 10, 2015, 12:39 pm

    Wow! Loved it. So light, bright, with storage! My only problem is I know for a fact the mosquitoes at a river property would eat me for breakfast, dinner and tea :(

  • Michael November 10, 2015, 5:17 pm

    Its great design. Kim it allows to put screens everywhere even on the open deck.

  • Sharee November 10, 2015, 11:38 pm

    This is the first realistic “home on water” I have seen on this site. Beautiful.

  • Denise November 13, 2015, 4:07 pm

    I sure miss Cahow’s comments here, so I will continue the applause trend that she started – this deserves a hearty ~ Clap! Clap! Clap! ~ It is perfect in every way – not too simple, not too complex, laid out with separated space but still open, a lot of sunlight flooding in, but with the ability to pull down shades to create privacy, a view all the way around, natural sunlight coming from the ceiling which can warm in wintertime, a warm wood interior, a compact on-demand water heater so you never run out of hot water, and a place for those of who love books us to store and create a nice library, a real flush toilet, spacious shower, this whole little river house pulls a person in by being so inviting and you get the sense that you can stay for a long time.

  • Gary November 23, 2015, 6:33 am

    First of all before any of you start calling me a nay sayer, I live and work on a offshore vessel in the Gulf. I am in love with the concept of living on the water. I spend 8 months of my life each year there. My family has looked at similar homes on Norris Lake and Dale Hollow Lake in TN.
    Unfortunately the TVA has been cracking down on this type of houseboat. Not everyone likes the idea of a small 1 or 2 bedroom waterfront apartment that has no tax burden for the state. Many million dollar homes surround lakes and rivers where this home would be perfect to live upon. So jealousy of a less extravagant lifestyle that is capable of living on “Their waterway” rears its head and probably had something to do with the TVA [which extends beyond Tennessee] taking an active interest in possibly removing this type of home from its controlled waters. In a similar situation several lakes in Alabama have out right banned all types of houseboats from their waters. The final judgement on the TVA decisions should be out by the end of this year or beginning 2016.
    Insurance for such a home is also a problem as each must [at the least] be documented with the USCG prior to approval and then you must find an insurance company willing to underwrite the policy on a home built platform and be able to justify it with signed Coast Guard records of inspection during the build.
    Many marinas also require upwards of a $300,000 liability policy naming them as a primary benifeciary in case of accidents.

    I personally like the idea of a compost toilet in this situation…however many areas require a pump out of once per week some regions of the U.S. mandate this. Other regions refuse to recognize a composting toilet for a houseboat even if it is one of two compost toilet companies that have passed the national safety regulatory standards within the U.S.
    This does not take into account gray water legislation coming down the pike on a national level and remember each state and estuary has its own ideas to modify or expand upon the federal level.

    Now if you took the time to read all of these limits and caveats…don’t give up your dreams. These are simply hurdles that need a bit of thought to overcome.

    I Love this Home and look forward to seeing more of this type of awesome thinking.

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