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Revolutionary Solar House Combines Customization with Prefabrication

The technology used to build this solar house is revolutionary.

After watching the video I can see it being the future of sustainable housing and energy not just for housing but also for working, commuting, and even transporting goods.

Software is used to design every component of the house according to the environment that it’s sitting in.

This means every angle is taken into account in regards to seasons and solar energy collection.

Once the design is completed, you send it off to the manufacturer which prints out every component of the house in 3D so that it arrives ready for you to assemble.

It’s massive customization uniting with prefabrication. This technology allowed them to put together the home in just two weeks after the parts arrived.


Revolutionary Solar House Combines Customization with Prefabrication

Photo Credit Faircompanies.com

Thanks to all of the strategically placed solar panels and windows, the home produces 150% of the energy it needs.

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How to design and build a non-combustible tiny house

By Aaron

Non-combustible construction in relation to Tiny Houses

In response to Kim’s tiny house fire, I decided to write the following article that it may save some grief to others by discussing an alternative to wood for construction methods of tiny houses. While this article primarily discusses steel framing compared to wood framing, framing certainly is a major component in our construction. After we change our framing we can begin swapping out components and lower our combustible construction materials significantly by using items such as metal furring, z-bar and non-combustible siding. Inside we can replace wood pine surfaces with plastic laminates, gypsum or metals again. This is not to say we cannot use wood, but by using less we greatly reduce our risk exposure to fire and other problems that arise in tiny houses.

Many people are choosing to build with wood for their tiny houses due to the ease of use, availability and perceived thermal superiority over other materials. However, there is a better alternative that trumps wood in every category: steel studs. Now many people have concerns about steel studs which I will address on in order.

  1. Availability, Cost, Weight & Benefits of Steel
  2. Thermal Conductivity
  3. Ease of Use – How to Assemble Steel Framing
  4. Non-combustible Wall, Roof & Floor Assemblies

How to design and build a non-combustible tiny house

Image: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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$19,000 Tiny Cabin on a Trailer and Quality vs Price

Wanted to show you this recently sold $19,000 Tiny Cabin on a Trailer for sale.


Just 128-square-feet in size with RV-style faux wood interior.

Kitchenette has a plug in two-burner stove, microwave, and small refrigerator.

It’s located in Tennessee and does include the all-so-common upstairs sleeping loft to use as a bedroom.

It’s difficult to tell what was used for siding on the exterior from the photos but overall not bad for the price.

I’d prefer to invest a little more money when building for better materials inside like tongue & groove pine, but that’s just me.

$19,000 Tiny Cabin on a Trailer and Quality vs Price

The idea of a lakeside tiny house on wheels seems really nice.

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Macy's Tiny House And Safety During Construction

Article by Laura LaVoie

What is it about the “Do It Yourself” and independent nature of tiny house builders that make us a little lenient about safety? Recently, Macy Miller of MiniMotives made waves across Facebook because she fell off the roof of her tiny house and landed in the hospital. 

Because of Macy’s misfortune, I thought this was a good time to talk to the tiny house community about safety. Many of us, myself certainly included, are not professional builders and a tiny house is our first project. Matt and I did much of our building together, but occasionally he worked on his own and he is a bit more of a risk taker than I am. He would climb up on the top of the walls or the rafters on a regular basis. Neither of us ever sustained more than minor injuries like small cuts and bruises. I once had a drill dropped on me from the loft, but that was more startling than damaging. But us tiny house builders do sometimes put safety on the back burner.

I reached out to Macy to find out more about what happened. It all started because she found herself away from her house for a while. She over committed, thinking she would be further along with the project by now. When she got back to work on the house it was a little overwhelming and she felt the need to rush. Since she had been away from building for a while there was some cleaning that needed to be done before she could begin the work she had planned. “It was all going well with a wash rag and a bucket of water but I continually had to go up and down the ladder to get new water every 2-3 feet or so,” she said. It was taking a lot of time so she had a seemingly inspired idea; “I brought the hose up on the roof with me, I stood-slash-sat up-slope from the water and cleaned the seams a thousand times faster.  It totally worked!  I got the seams cleaned in a fraction of the time.” That was when the trouble started. She told me she was being “Super careful and super aware,” but that isn’t always good enough when it comes to construction safety.

Macy's Tiny House And Safety During Construction

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Tiny House with a Standup Loft and Sweet Front Porch

This tiny house is not so tiny so I also threw it into our small house category.. Even though it’s really small.

It’s up for sale right now and they’re asking $85,000 for it (Update: sold). The property is in Maine.

Apparently it’s 186-square-feet but I don’t think that figure takes into account the loft space.

Inside there’s enough room for full sized couches and you’ll find a relatively normal sized kitchen.

The great part is that the sleeping loft has plenty of headroom. Enough for most of us to stand up in.

Another great feature of this small house is the generous front porch to hang out in which helps extend the space to the outdoors.

Tiny House with a Standup Loft and Sweet Front Porch

© Peggy Crockett

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Entrance to Tiny Cabin by the River

Article by Laura LaVoie

Henry David Thoreau is often held up as the first tiny house adventurer; the Granddaddy of our movement, as it were. His history is complicated and interesting and to truly understand his place in the American narrative one must pour through Walden and Civil Disobedience. His philosophies are almost always shoehorned into those of his intellectual counterparts in the transcendental movement but he never quite fits there. If you’re willing to take some time to read his writing you can find plenty of inspiration for tiny house living.

Thoreau is often considered an important figure in modern environmentalism – he was an environmental scientist after all. When we put it into perspective we understand that he studied the environment in a time before cars, holes in the ozone, and the other crises we face today. Environmentalism was important to him and he not only studied it as a scientist but he revered it as a religion and a way of life. However, the motivation of building a tiny house on a friend’s land was about more than trading lightly on nature. In my estimation his real impetus was to live deliberately.

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.” 

Living Deliberately is what I think the Tiny House Movement is all about. The common denominators for all of the people I’ve met and spoken to who have built a small house chose this experience because they want to live deliberately. We want to separate ourselves from our complicated lives. We tend to be very purposeful in every decision we make along the way. I think this is what Thoreau taught us with his experiment at Walden.

Entrance to Tiny Cabin by the River
Tiny Cabin on the River © Travis

“Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.”

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Tiny Geodesic Dome Home on Stilts with a View

There are so many ways to live a simple lifestyle, especially when you decide to go off-grid.

When you’re in rural land, you’re often allowed to build a variety of structures. And many times- as little as you like!

So how about this tiny geodesic dome home on stilts with a view? It was recently up for sale with the land in Alaska but it’s no longer available.

Either way I wanted to showcase it here on Tiny House Talk and add it to the dome homes category because I thought you’d enjoy it.

Take a look and then share what you liked best about it in the comments at the bottom of this post. You’ll get a peek inside, too.

Tiny Geodesic Dome Home on Stilts with a View

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