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The Cube Tiny House by Little Byron


This is the Cube Tiny House by Little Byron. It’s built by hand out of Byron Bay, Australia.

This tiny house is a 3.5m long by 3.5m wide and 3.5m high, which is why it’s called The Cube! Have you ever considered a cubed tiny house design, sort of like this one?

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The Cube Tiny House by Little Byron, Built by Hand in Byron Bay, Australia

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

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Images via Little Byron

The Cube Tiny House by Little Byron 009

Images via Little Byron

Learn more (credits)

  1. Little Byron Tiny Homes Built by Hand in Byron Bay, Australia
  2. Projects and Price Guides (more info)
  3. https://www.instagram.com/littlebyronco/

More Tiny Houses by Little Byron

Other Cube-like Tiny Homes

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 16 comments… add one }
  • Avatar Maggie
    February 17, 2020, 3:29 pm

    It’s really cute, but I cook in pans bigger than that sink! Hmmm…would I wash them in the shower?

    • Avatar Leo Cleversley
      February 17, 2020, 7:03 pm

      You can wash them outside.. It’s not that far a walk. Also can set up a cooking station outside as well for the larger pots etc. Adapt and overcome. easy peazy.

    • Avatar Steveinsandiego
      February 17, 2020, 7:07 pm

      Sigh, another TH story that omits critical information: does australia allow tiny houses? Must the THs be built to a local written code and be inspected prior to occupancy? What is the status of the land: owned by the house owner-occupant? Rented or leased? Squatted upon? How far from groceries, petrol, and medical services? With such sketchy information i can only infer that the story is fake. all the hype about tiny house being SO affordable and SO inexpensive is never verified in the many stories i have read. Hate to be adverserial, but no one seems to want to divulge ALL the info.

      • Avatar John Thompson
        February 17, 2020, 7:48 pm

        I don’t think the “industry” is unwilling to share information; it’s too much to look into local building and zoning when the primary purpose of this website is (I think) to stimulate discussion and provide a real estate listing website that doesn’t have real estate. It has a mix of RVs that look like houses, a few park models (which are legally designated as an RV in every jurisdiction that I’ve searched (and that’s dozens but not hundreds) then there are the odd inclusions of small/not useful old buildings that are rehabbed. And by whatever designation they are given and legally have, the PRIME reason for purchase/construction is to get on the AirBnB express train.
        My assumption is that ANY tiny home only can get legal parking is if you have your TH titled as an RV and parked in an RV park. Local jurisdictions can limit the length of stay in an RV park. That is the only thing that affects everything else about a TH.
        My further assumption is that the self-reliant DIY and green footprint people (the footprint not the people) and alternative lifestylers started this craze and found a way to CIRCUMVENT, building codes, land use, zoning, regional planning, and local resistance (NIMBY forever). THEN they realized, for example that their “house” and all its personal property was UNINSURABLE, that they were not allowed to get a physical address, not allowed to hook into the water and sewer services that might otherwise have been available, not allowed to do any damn thing the local rulers and landowners wanted to keep you, and those like you, out.
        The model statutes for Accessory Dwelling Units and for otherwise non-compliant structures are a good start for the TH phenomenon become “real” and self sustaining. From Spur Texas to Portland Oregon to Florida, there are things sprouting.
        One thing that will never sprout is an affordable AND livable house. I love the units being built in northern Wisconsin, they are shown here a lot. Interesting that their newest feature is financing! Remember when everybody talked about value? By the square foot (being the only generally recognized way to estimate costs) almost NONE of the units that show up here are remotely in the running for affordable.

        • Avatar Steveinsandiego
          February 19, 2020, 12:27 pm

          Hey! If TH owners are so excited about their new life style, why on earth would they be unwilling to share the details? I’m not afraid to tell you that i paid $530k for my 935 sf zero-lot line bungalow less than a mile from the beach in north san diego county.
          Or that we enjoy a substantially above average retirement.
          But, believe it or not, i wouldnt mind moving elsewhere, living in something about the same size with equivalent quality and amenities for lots less…..hehe, with more to spend on other stuff 😉
          Don’t misunderstand me; i’m rather fascinated by the TH development, but those who participate – new owners, manufacturers, etc. – seem to be fairly silent about how much it costs, and whether they are obeying or breaking the law. And i am NOT sour grapes….😁

      • Avatar James D.
        February 17, 2020, 7:50 pm

        Consider… How many people do you know post their entire life stories in intricate details without any regard to their personal privacy? Let alone without anyone ever asking a question and bothering to contact them first? Or how practical it would be to always go through an entire book of information that may not even apply to everyone each and every time one of these stories are posted?

        Some thing you just have to research, and there’s proper ways to go about getting that information but it helps to read the whole article and click the provided links… Like the “Projects and Price Guides (more info)” under the Learn More section addresses part of what you’re asking… A lot of times you just need to know where to look… Many times people who share their homes will also be on social media or have a way to contact them if you want to know certain specifics. You can also contact the builder, who will be usually more than happy to provide a lot of details on what’s involved and what options are available.

        There’s also resources dedicated to helping people find that sort of information, like Tiny House Expedition has amassed a pretty large database for anyone interested in Tiny Homes in the states and there’s similar resources for other countries.

        Living Big In A Tiny House being another example as the host of that one has toured homes in multiple countries and even had his own tiny home built in two separate countries.

        I understand it can be frustrating but it’s not impossible to get information…

        • Avatar Eric
          February 26, 2020, 3:36 am

          “Consider… How many people do you know post their entire life stories in intricate details without any regard to their personal privacy?”

          I’d say just about everybody on Farcebook, oops sorry Fakebook. That’s who.

          That’s why you’ll never see me on (anti)social media. At. All.

        • Avatar James D.
          February 27, 2020, 1:49 am

          @Eric – IMO, not really, plenty of people on social media are not posting everything or making it public for anyone but friends and family to view. Mostly a vocal minority, especially those addicted to it are who fit the stereotype… While most others focus on interests and hobbies that thus post a much more narrow range of information…

          Besides, even there people aren’t posting everything in one go but more of a blog or diary where you have to follow for a long time to get the whole story and even cross over to multiple social media sites to fill in the blanks…

          While a article or video has to do that in just one go and usually within a time frame of minutes before most people’s attention spans are tested… Summarizing and compressing everything to fit is understandably not a task most would even try to accomplish, even if they were inclined to do so… and as I posted before it’s questionable that it would be practical to post an entire book of information each and every time one of these stories are posted.

          Everyone also has different priorities and comfort levels of what they will discuss. Typically, people will focus on things they are most knowledgeable on and/or are the to them the main focus of what they want to discuss… So there will always be something not covered or not gone into as much details as other things… as well as simply things some people may never think of when doing the tour…

      • Avatar Michael L
        March 6, 2020, 2:19 pm

        Why are all your comments so negative and argumentative? This site is about people being kind enough to share information about be their homes. Alex shares the information he’s been provided.

    • Avatar Jimmy Morgan
      February 17, 2020, 8:28 pm

      Hi, I live in the tropics, (Liberia, West Africa). I’ve often wondered if those loft bedrooms mounted high up (in so many tiny home plans), would be comfortable and not hot, here in the tropics?
      I’m living off grid and need to use my solar system resources for lights, freezer and cell phones.
      Thanks in advance

      • Avatar Alex
        February 18, 2020, 11:43 am

        It would be hotter up there so you would probably just want to redesign so you are sleeping on the main level, or, you could ventilate/air condition up there to help reduce heat.

  • Avatar steveinsandiego
    February 18, 2020, 2:17 pm

    hi, james d, and john t. thanx for your input.
    honestly, i find the TH industry rather fascinating. i’ve forever been a “less is better” sort of guy, much to the frustration of my wife of 50 yrs’ …lol. in fact, three yrs ago we downsized from 2k sq ft to 935 sq ft, a detached, zero-lot line neighborhood…both of us love it.
    my problem is that many of the TH stories appear to be violating the law in one way or the other, and the tiny-housers appear to indicate, with implied swagger: i don’t care what the law requires or disallows, as if to pronounce, i’m the only one important around here, and no one else counts.
    Most laws are put into place to protect us, and we should be grateful for that. Imagine a housebuilder who shortcuts electrical, plumbing, and other building codes, endangering the buyer in order to make a quick and easy buck. Sure, some regs seem rather onerous, but i imagine most are developed with worthwhile intent.
    a few other notes: a house on wheels, that must be moved every so often: y’need a $50k pick-up to accomplish that task…where are the so-called “savings” 😉 ? and location? distances to goods and services would certainly be important to me. 3 hrs south to the dentist? 2 hrs north to fill up the gas tank? 2 hrs west for groceries? i’m exaggerating to make a point, of course.
    i am concerned about high housing prices. teachers who cant afford to live where they work is a huge problem, san diego county an example. higher density doesn’t seem to solve the problem. Yet, house and apt construction is thriving…i don’t get it, except i think a lot of foreign money is involved. around here, new neighborhoods are frequently sold out before construction is completed.
    well, i suppose this conversation could go on forever. i’ve got other stuff to do now. TTYL… more 😉

    • Avatar James D.
      February 19, 2020, 12:52 am

      Actually, as long as you have a permanent place to put them then houses on wheels never need to be moved. It’s just an option and you can usually either rent a tow vehicle or hire a moving company if you ever do vs owning a dedicated vehicle… Most tiny home owners aren’t going to move their home more than 1-3 times, it’s rare for anyone to be actually nomadic with a tiny house.

      While something to understand about regs is they’re not flexible or open to common sense. If you want to do something that hasn’t been specifically spelled out in the regs, it doesn’t matter if its perfectly save or even better than what is normally done.

      So, unless you can afford to hire an engineer or architect that can sign off on it then they’re simply not going to approve it. Thus it’s very difficult to do anything different even if it’s a minor difference. Some regs can also go back decades and may be outdated to modern needs.

      While people tend to cling to old stereotypes and generally fear change or anything different as automatically being wrong and considered dangerous until proven otherwise by irrefutable evidence.

      Reasons for regs can also include politics, concern about things like property values for things like just how the structure appears, etc. as well as cost considerations. Like modern codes increasingly require higher energy efficiency standards…

      While there’s a difference between something not being covered under the law from it being illegal… Problem with tiny houses is primarily that they’re not covered and that’s one of the reasons they get confused with RV’s because that is what the law covers. Again, regs aren’t flexible, they’re limited to how they are specifically worded and interpreted and it’s above the pay grade of those usually in charge of enforcing those regs to figure out what can work if there isn’t a specific example of it in the regs…

      So there’s more than one way to look at it…

      Overall problem is most people will be limited to working within the limits of the existing system and it’s a struggle to make any changes.

      Like, container homes are also fairly new and you would be hard pressed to get financing to build a home from them but after you have done so and it has passed inspections then a buyer can then get financing to purchase it with no problems… Anything new is always going to have problems/resistance but that eventually passes.

      Tiny Houses are increasingly becoming legal, they’re officially included in the 2018 IRC ICC with Appendix Q, states like Oregon have the Reach Code, Washing state has passed bills that largely legalize them and give more and more options, even California is allowing them as ADU’s and relaxing restrictions…

      But they’re not going to work everywhere… Apartments can be much higher population density than houses, which makes them much more efficient in use in cities, for example. So they’re more a additional option that is going to make housing more efficient and flexible but isn’t going to take over the whole housing market by itself…

      • Avatar Eric
        February 26, 2020, 4:07 am

        Even if you do need to move them, I’m pretty sure that you could tow it out onto a street, and then tow it back on. Compliance with the order completed. And park it slightly different on section so council could see that it has been moved.

        But personally I’d rather park away from town, out in the wop wops, with nearest neighbours about the same distance that Davy Crockett complained about as being too close… as I recall that neighbour was about 5 miles away, but Davy could see the chimney smoke. LOL

  • Avatar Sean
    February 24, 2020, 1:36 pm

    Sleek and modern inside, but looks like it’s covered in old pallets on the outside. Strange design choice.

    • Avatar Eric
      February 26, 2020, 4:09 am

      Yeah, not a fan of the external look either. IMHO it looks kinda trashy. Sort of like that thing they call Shabby Chic. Bleuch!

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