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Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron


This is the Banjo Tiny House. It’s a hand made tiny home built by a company called Little Byron. They’re located in Byron Bay, South Wales, Australia.

This little home has a beautiful look and feel. Lots of windows and very airy. Take a look and see for yourself. What do you think? This tiny home is already sold, but they are working on their next one called the Nulla. You could also inquire about having them build another one just like this one. More info at the bottom of this page.

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The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 001

Images via Little Byron

As you can see, loads of functioning windows so you can really get the air moving through your tiny house. I love this!

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 002

Images via Little Byron

I really like this type of window too, it looks really nice, don’t you think? It’s also interesting how laid out the sleeping area and living room, isn’t it?

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 003

Images via Little Byron

It’s also pretty cool how the bar area opens up to the outside, isn’t it?

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 004

Images via Little Byron

The kitchen is really simple, has plenty of storage, and it’s all open! How do you feel about that?

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 005

Images via Little Byron

Here’s a better look at that bar. The window just opens up. Incredible, right?

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 006

Images via Little Byron

The bathroom with a large window that opens up to air the space out.

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 007

Images via Little Byron

The showerhead is literally overhead 🙂

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 008

Images via Little Byron

This is the main floor bed bunk.

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 009

Images via Little Byron

Being towed by a Jeep? Seriously? I don’t think that’s supposed to happen but might be alright for short distances.

The Banjo Tiny House by Little Byron 0010

Images via Little Byron

 

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At Little Byron we are so aware of creating the opportunity for our clients to live their #bestlife in one of our unique handmade Tiny Homes. Let’s face it, the benefits of going small are huge… * Lower Expenses. * No Mortgage. … * Lower Energy Use. … * Freedom of Movement. … * Easier Maintenance. … * Harmony With Nature. … * A Simpler Life. Here’s one of our favorite photos of ‘Banjo’ who left Little Byron just before Christmas last year. Banjo’s new owner now has him set up on her small property for guests and visitors alike to stay in with future plans to move in to Banjo herself when the last family members leave the nest allowing her to rent the main house and live a simpler existence. So many lifestyle opportunities when you decide to embrace the big picture and live small. 👉🏼 www.littlebyron.com.au 👈🏼

A post shared by Little Byron Co (@littlebyronco) on

Learn more about Little Byron Tiny House Builders Based in Australia

Little Byron | The Banjo Tiny House | The Nulla Tiny House (Coming Soon) | Instagram | Contact

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 22 comments… add one }
  • Avatar Elizabeth Rubio
    August 4, 2019, 8:11 pm

    LOVE IT!! Wonderful for New Zealand; not so much for northern climes.

    • Avatar James D.
      August 14, 2019, 6:33 pm

      It’s in Australia but otherwise agree with that statement…

  • Avatar Gina Malone
    August 4, 2019, 8:11 pm

    Love Love Love the indoor outdoor bar!

  • Avatar Michael
    August 4, 2019, 9:22 pm

    I like the style, design and craftsmen ship but dislike sleeping arrangement and overall height which may tip it in strong winds.
    Although there is no information about weight, purpose for creating an open space is weight saving and optical widening but is it practical when it comes to cleaning and moving?

    • Avatar James D.
      August 14, 2019, 8:12 pm

      It’s in Australia, which means they have to build within a max height of 4.3 metres (~14′ 1.3″), max width of 2.5 metres (~8′ 2.5″), max length of 12.5 metes (~41′), and it all needs to be under 4.5 tonnes, or just under 9,921 lbs max…
      .
      So they will typically be lighter than in the states, but they have a much more temperate climate to deal with there, and there will generally never be very high winds.

      Besides, the open layout helps ensure a low center of gravity and as long as it is parked in one spot it can simply be anchored to the ground.

      While practical depends, as everything has it’s trade offs and there are both cons and pros to any design layout and can depend more on the people using it…

      • Avatar Agatha
        August 16, 2019, 9:17 pm

        Boy, you have never visited here, have you?
        It’s a great tiny house and the bar window is lovely. Except I can’t see any seals so it’s not great for keeping out the heat, cold, wind, sand… but then again – Australian houses are notoriously badly constructed, not fit for the climate with their insufficient insulation and single glazed windows. Those louvre windows everyone here is raving about… friends got seduced and had them installed in their house. They say they’ll forever regret it. There is no seals so the draft in cold weather is awful and in summer the house is even hotter than usual.

        • Avatar James D.
          August 16, 2019, 11:01 pm

          It may not seem like it where you are but compared to the climate of North America,the Australian climate is more temperate.and deals with fewer extreme weather conditions. It’s just still a large continent and there will be places that will differ from the average..

          Like Darwin, Northern Territory has on average highs of 32 °C (90 °F) to lows of 23 °C (74 °F), for example… Versus Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, which has on average highs of 20 °C (68 °F) to lows of 7 °C(45 °F).

          But mind, one of the key differences with Tiny Houses is that smaller structures are much easier to heat and cool than larger houses. Plus, movable houses also means it can be placed in different directions and locations as the seasons change… So a lot can work that wouldn’t for a much larger home…

        • Avatar Jake
          August 17, 2019, 6:35 am

          Disagree with your first statement. You have obviously never visited there. Far more extremes in the US than here.

          But on the louvres I agree totally. Those things are shit. They break easily, they get broken into easily, they let in the drafts, they let in bugs (never thought about sand) and as they age they jam and bend. Must be young people who never grew up with them who are making these praising comments. Sliding double glazing beats them for looks and effectiveness hands down.

        • Avatar Wiz Zard
          September 24, 2019, 5:59 pm

          Like the owners, I, too, love the extra air provided by louvered windows. Were this my little THOW, I would design shutters to close and seal the louvered window area when the temperatures demand it. Best of both worlds! Having had louvered windows before, I will say that they work best when 1) there is appropriate ongoing maintenance 2) no small children or angry spouses (or harsh driving conditions/road bumps) that slam the delicate machinery. With those caveats (and the addition of sealing shutters) in mind, I love louvres!

  • Avatar Gail
    August 5, 2019, 1:39 pm

    What a fantastic layout and the decor…..just beautiful!

  • Avatar D. Pedersen
    August 6, 2019, 1:11 am

    I really like this. Nice use of space and very open.

  • Avatar Diana stair
    August 6, 2019, 8:43 am

    Would love this to downsize to. So clean, efficient,customized who wouldn’t love to own this?

  • Avatar Greg Hughes
    August 6, 2019, 9:54 pm

    That’s a really nice design for a warmer climate. Those jalousie windows are something you don’t see much anymore but I really like them. Well done all around.

  • Avatar Shawna
    August 13, 2019, 12:33 pm

    really like what they did with the living / bedroom spaces!! bar window really nice!

  • Avatar Heather HJ
    August 16, 2019, 7:47 pm

    Your not pulling that with Jeep. Not even a block. I have a Jeep max tow capacity is 2000lbs for standard wranglers up to 3500lbs w/ models newer than 2014 that are 4 door or the Sahara models. My Jeeps a trooper but she cant pull a full size THOW! So the pic w/ the Jeep is very misleading. I don’t understand why they included this pic at all. If your in Jeep family then you know how ludacris this pic is. I’m hoping to be able to tow a teardrop trailer.

  • Avatar Agatha
    August 17, 2019, 6:54 am

    In response to Jake (don’t know why I can’t respond directly) – yes, I’m aware that the climate range in the US is much greater than in Australia – from very hot to very cold. However, averages (as in average temperatures) don’t really say anything about how uncomfortable it can get. I might be living in an area where the average max. temperatures are moderate but if my house is not built to keep me comfortable during those 40+ degrees C or on those 0 degrees C mornings it won’t and I’ll be miserable. And I don’t want to be miserable for 1/3 of the year if I can avoid it.
    I agree with you on double glazing. Single glazing is fit only for places with the most moderate, temperate climate without any spikes in any direction and I wonder where those places are. Anywhere else it’s like putting on a sweater in summer and expecting to not be hot or cutting holes in your winter jacket and expecting it to keep you warm in winter.
    But not sliding. We’ve had some double glazed sliding windows and doors before – never again. Going double glazed and sliding is a waste of money. Hugely inferior performance compared to hinged when it comes to prevention of drafts, keeping out noise, rain, dust. And since nowadays you can get in Australia the German tilt & turn windows – why wouldn’t you install those? No drafts, great for keeping noise out, you can leave them open safely over night. No drawbacks.

  • Avatar Lynda
    August 19, 2019, 5:05 am

    Must agree about the louvre windows. It would be hell in summer with all those mozzies! The Australian bush is teeming with insects on a summer night.

  • Avatar Nana
    September 8, 2019, 8:07 am

    Perhaps the best thow I’ve ever seen! Wonderful use of space and ingenious use of windows. Bravo!

    • Avatar Alex
      September 9, 2019, 7:57 am

      Thanks, Nana, glad you liked it so much too!

  • Avatar J. Turner
    September 24, 2019, 7:14 pm

    Lots of really terrific features–I’m not on-side with everything (louvered windows give me an unpleasant childhood flashback involving a really large insect, and I’m too much of a slob to make the open storage under the sink work without looking like absolute crap), but it’s attractive and well-thought out.

  • Avatar Margaret Davis Ward
    September 25, 2019, 6:05 am

    love this

  • Avatar Michael L
    October 13, 2019, 4:12 pm

    I love the overall design… bright, good flow and, yes, I love the windows. I’ve had those in two homes in FL.

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