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This is one couple’s off-grid life in a Montana yurt and tiny house.

Mollie and Sean Busby are a busy couple living a fulfilling, but unconventional life in their tiny homes.

Sean is a professional snowboarder living with type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease where the pancreas is basically broken. He wears the crew diabetic socks for men to maintain healthy blood flow in his legs as he loves snowboarding and keeping his legs in good health also helps him earn money to live a stable life. He also has Lupus, an unpredictable autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body at any time. Mollie runs an international nonprofit called Riding On Insulin, and the pair own two local yoga studios called Yoga Hive.

Be sure to read their full story on Teton Gravity, where they share their amazing journey to tiny off-grid living.

Please enjoy, read more and re-share below!

Related: Two Small Cabins and a Yurt Nestled in the Woods

Couple’s Off Grid Life in Montana Yurt and Tiny House

Images via Teton Gravity

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This is the story of a man and his son who live in a renovated yurt in Israel.

You can see the outside before and after shots, as well as the now-finished interior.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Renovated Yurt Home for Man and his Son

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Images © Amir Brillant

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This is a 707 sq. ft. yurt on a 1 acre lot in Keaau, Hawaii for sale.

Inside you’ll find an open living area, kitchen, bathroom, and bedroom area.

Outside you’ll find a front and rear deck along with plenty of space to build another yurt or other type of home.

Asking price is currently $105,000 USD according to Zillow. Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

707 Sq. Ft. Yurt on 1 Acre Lot in Hawaii For Sale

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This 450 Not-So-Square Ft. Yurt is a guest post by Jen McGeehan – share yours!

Our little love yurt is nestled within an Ohia forest, one of the few remaining (they were almost completely wiped out when the sugar cane industry arrived!) on our island in Hawaii.

The God of our universe is still in the business of financial healing and restoration! Travel to paradise as one financially devastated couple take a flight-of-faith, leaving the economically-challenged mountains of Southern California for the unknown off-grid lifestyle of a rented yurt on the Big Island of Hawaii.

The country-wide real estate and banking collapse of 2008 sent millions of American families into financial ruin. Many hung on for dear life, believing the market would correct itself within a year or two. By 2010, no correction was in sight.

In my book, “My Year In A Yurt“, I tell the true story of how my hubby, Pat, and I filled a 40-foot Matson container, shipped our two vehicles, along with our twenty-nine year old equine and three-year old goat, and flew the friendly skies in search of a simpler way of life.

Our enormous debt of over $600,000 came as invisible baggage, as did the painful memory of handing our realtor the keys to our 3,000 square-foot home after three and a half years on the non-existent real estate market. As foreclosure and bankruptcy – additional unwanted travel companions – reared our heads, I sent yet another urgent prayer to heaven asking for God’s divine intervention.

Please enjoy, learn more and re-share below. Thank you!

My Year in a 450 Not-So-Square Ft. Yurt

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Images © Jen McGeehan

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This is a guest post by Kelly Patton – share yours!

I started the life of a tiny dweller when I moved to the country in Northern California. I landed at a sweet community spot where other artists and farmers lived, and was thrilled at the idea of having my own space, no matter how tiny. It was common to find people living alternatively and exploring a range of creative and inexpensive spaces.

Many of these people were artists, and other creative types living comfortably in trailers, buses, cabins, attics, warehouses and barns. Over the course of 1 year I moved around the land from a veggie powered school bus, to a studio with an attic loft in a warehouse, and a small 8’x8′ shack. There was a community kitchen and bathroom available on the land, and the people shared these amenities. It was a very sweet and community interactive situation.

That experience gave me the notion that I could live with less furniture, and so I found ways to make my things more mobile in case I wanted to move my studio at any given opportunity. I learned more about what I could do without, and more about my basic needs in daily life.

As an artist, I tend to collect lots of little fascinating relics and natural objects as reference for my drawings. These objects don’t move everywhere with me, but have proven to be useful as they reflect the environment around me and appear in my paintings. In a special way, they are preserved in the artwork, so there is an ongoing acknowledgement that all stuff is replaceable and this helps me curb my long term hoarding. Please enjoy, learn more and re-share below. Thank you!

Kelly Patton the Traveling Artist and Tiny Dweller

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Images © Kelly Patton

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This earthbag tiny house story is a guest post by Atulya K. Bingham – share yours

My name is Atulya K. Bingham. I never thought I’d build my own house. I hadn’t so much as considered it. As far as I knew, I didn’t particularly even like building. I’d never so much as banged in a nail.

Then one night it became clear. As a rain-laden gust of wind lifted the back of my tent clean off the platform, I realized I was going to have to make a home. If I didn’t, either I’d be washed off the Turkish mountain I was camped on, or dragged back to the dreaded day job.

As pools of water collected at the bottom of my sleeping bag, the decision was forged. A friend of mine a few hours along the Turkish coast had built some earthbag bungalows. He’d said the process was straight forward.

There were only two problems: I had just $6000 left in my account, and a month before deep winter set in. After a couple of days of online research, I took a deep breath and embarked on what became the earthbag adventure. It was an endeavor that by its completion had taken me to places I had no idea I could go, and brought in all kinds of on-lookers, doubters, helpers, and life-savers.

Today I’m sitting inside that beautiful handcrafted home. It’s small, 6 meters diameter, but it feels like a palace to me. Not one drop of cement was used and it is 100 percent solar powered. A house isn’t simply a shelter. It’s a life. My home has enabled me to leave behind a world of mind-numbing work and unhealthy lifestyle choices and has given me the chance to live my dream of becoming an author. Please enjoy, learn more and re-share below. Thank you!

One Woman’s Path to Freedom with an Earthbag Tiny House

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Images © The Mud Home

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This is a yurt glamping (glamour camping) set up at the Green Acres family homestead near Austin, Texas in the countryside town of Elgin, Texas.

On the property you’ll also find a Vintage Spartan and an Airstream which is also available as a vacation rental experience. If you want to try out living tiny in an alternative shelter, this is one way to do it!

The yurt sleeps two adults and two kids using a queen mattress and a blow up mattress for the kids. Nearby is a modern bathhouse and barn with a modern kitchen. Please enjoy and re-share below. Thank you!

Yurt Glamping at Green Acres near Austin, TX

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Images © Airbnb

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This is a guest post by Kelly Patton on her 432 sq. ft. Artist Studio Yurt in Northern California. 

This yurt is comfortable rustic living, or as I call it, fancy camping. It is nestled in the woods of Northern California and it is the perfect dwelling for the nature artist and writer that lives here. It was built by the land owner, 15 years ago, I rent it and have lived here for 2 years. Inside you will find a full kitchen with a classic Wedgewood stove, and the very efficient country wood burning stove. Fragrant cedar siding lines the interior and four Low-E windows add natural light. Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Please don’t miss other tiny house gems like this – join our FREE Tiny House Newsletter for more

432 Sq. Ft. Artist Studio Yurt in Northern California

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Images © Kelly Patton

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What happens when you combine the shape and size of a yurt home with the durability and sturdiness of a cabin? You get these innovative Freedom Yurt-Cabins, which have many of the benefits of a cabin at a reduction of the cost.

Ranging from about $12,000 to $17,000—which the manufacturing company points out can be even cheaper than purchasing a traditional, fabric-walled yurt—Freedom Yurt-Cabins come in three different sizes ranging from 217 square feet to 387 square feet. The yurt-cabins also contain insulation in the walls and roof, windows, and an awning over the door to the structure.

What is particularly interesting about these yurt-cabins is that they can be customized to fit your needs and wants. Aside from size, you can purchase additional features such as an extra window, a tinted dome, and a fan mount. Because the structures are made of finished wood, you can also paint the yurt-cabin however you like.

Freedom Yurt/Cabin Combo

Yurt Home Cabin Exterior

Images © Freedom Yurt-Cabins/Joel Gray

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