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Small Community of Tiny Homes For Sale in Highlands, NJ


This is a large community of tiny homes for sale in Highlands, New Jersey. There are a total of 11 tiny homes in different sizes and conditions. The eBay bid price is currently $239,500 for the houses with a stellar water view.

Outside, you’ll notice these homes have seen better days: they were once part of a 1920’s bungalow colony. The homes surround a central courtyard and would be a perfect fix-er upper opportunity for folks hoping to live with like-minded tiny house enthusiasts. Some houses need more help than others, but by city ordinance they can be used for year-round dwelling if not seriously altered. Five of the homes are 12×20 feet and five larger homes are 14×18 feet and there is one two-story main house.

On the inside, some homes have wood planking, pastel milk paint, and old wooden flooring. You can take advantage of this great opportunity to create the tiny house community of your dreams.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Small Community of Tiny Homes For Sale in Highlands, NJ

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Images © njview via eBay

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Images © njview via eBay

Small Community of Tiny Homes For Sale in Highlands, NJ

Our big thanks to Fred for sharing!

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.

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{ 22 comments… add one }
  • Elizabeth Rubio February 9, 2016, 6:15 pm

    I agree with the above comments. The possibilities for this site tickle the imagination. Substantial funding would be necessary, but if a philanthropic organization could be interested, and a group of volunteers rounded up, much good could come of it, and an historical site preserved as well.

  • Lebron February 9, 2016, 6:17 pm

    Wow, the winner had better be ready for a huge restoration project to get these places hospitable. I see asbestos, lead paint, rotting wood, etc… Having said that, I love the idea and think these type of places should exist all over. Seems folks back in the day didn’t need 3000+ square feet to survive. I’m sure in it’s day this was a very happy community.

  • Gabrielle Charest February 9, 2016, 7:53 pm

    Quite amazing, really. Great opportunity for someone with vision and some funding. Now, if I win the lottery. . . .

  • Kristina H Nadreau February 9, 2016, 8:34 pm

    I wish I were 15 years younger and still had the money needed to do this project. This could be a winner. what an opportunity!!!

  • Nancy N February 9, 2016, 10:04 pm

    Wow, what an opportunity for someone. Unfortunately, that someone is not me.

  • Marsha Cowan February 9, 2016, 10:22 pm

    I don’t see this as an opportunity for the homeless at all. I see this as an opportunity for young tax paying hard working couples with children who need a leg up to have home and a community to support them. It is this demography that is suffering most in our country. A little over the mark for government aid, or government housing, yet unable to afford the typical rent in most places. Why not give them a leg up this time?

  • Darcy February 9, 2016, 10:52 pm

    Omg, the only cure for this is a bull dozen. 239,000 plus about a million in Reno cost. Someone with more money than brain will buy it.

  • Sharee February 9, 2016, 11:20 pm

    The $239,000 bid…is that a total price for land and all the building put together? When I started reading I thought the price was for each building and all I could think of was ehw! and yuck!

  • Jamie February 10, 2016, 12:04 am

    Just read the ebay listing; looks like they dont ship to Australia. But hey if they did!

  • Richard February 10, 2016, 5:46 am

    So…. Why has it been allowed to descend into such ruin?
    Most of us would love to create a (seemingly almost impossible) TH community and having done it, we would not let it go.
    Why did it fail? Was it the model that didn’t work? Did living tiny actually prove to be unsuitable for the residents?

    • Richard February 10, 2016, 5:57 am

      Whoops – just went to the ebay listing and answered my own questions.
      Damn my itchy trigger finger!

      • eugene February 10, 2016, 12:13 pm

        I know about the trigger finger syndrome, good thing I am in Canada.

  • Toney February 10, 2016, 3:22 pm

    Looks as if they have suffered flood damage. Are they in a flood zone? If so, considering the lack of elevation to the Base Flood Elevation equals higher flood insurance premiums and would be a requirement for any type of funding which is backed by federally insured loans.

  • Valerie February 10, 2016, 5:21 pm

    Has anyone Googled this location? It is less than two blocks to Sandy Hook Bay, and less than two blocks to the shopping area. These houses would be great to rent out to New Yorkers wanting to get out of the city for a couple of days!
    If you see water damage, I would assume that Sandy was hard on them. But what a location!

  • Jean February 23, 2016, 12:13 pm

    A family could get this together. But the idea of weekend getaways sounds good too.

  • Michelle February 1, 2017, 1:54 pm

    It’s true that bungalow colonies were the original “tiny homes”! I hope this Highlands gem found a buyer to save it because the sense of community you get living in one of these communities is unique. We still spend our summers in one of the few remaining lakeside bungalow colonies (now a coop community) in Westchester, NY. Owners have been slowly modernizing units but trying to keep the original spirit. We don’t find much asbestos since the 1930s units were very simple and not insulated, but we do find some crazy old newspapers under 1950s Formica floors. Still pretty affordable to buy and keep, thank goodness.

  • Geannine July 25, 2017, 1:34 am

    Great investment opportunity for someone wh has or can get the funds to buy this project. I am willing to donate my time to help restore. My advise would be “Restore & Rent.”
    Cha Ching 🤗

  • Bill April 2, 2018, 10:33 pm

    I am one of the owners of this compound and just discovered this article and the very thoughtful comments that followed it. Everyone of you was right on point and we had the same ideas. We wanted to preserve these in some form but originally could not find the right construction funding. We were lucky enough to find a out-of-the-box investor who partnered with us and after a reasonable expenditure I am happy to report that everyone of these buildings is renovated in a way to preserve your character of it brings them up to the next level.

    I am one of the owners of this compound and just discovered this article and the very thoughtful comments that followed it. Everyone of you was right on point and we had the same ideas. We wanted to preserve these in some form but originally could not find the right construction funding. We were lucky enough to find a out-of-the-box investor who partnered with us and after a reasonable expenditure I am happy to report that everyone of these buildings is renovated in a way to preserve its character but with redesigned elements that brings them up to the next level. Most of our renovated bathrooms with walk in showers would be considered handicapped friendly and although most of the cottages have two or three steps leading up to them with a little more work in making a deck/ramp among all of them.. this could be an ideal all handicapped compound for example. However we wanted to bring new foot traffic into the area and we are currently running it as a daily weekly or monthly rental cottage, sort of a cross between an Airbnb and a regular hotel experience. We’re always open year round and they can be visited anytime -I hope you will check them out if you are in the area. Now that they are 100% renovated We will see how much fun we have operating them for the next year or so and if someone creative comes along with a different and better idea who knows …they could become the next owner of this place if we decide to move on. One thing is for sure it is unlikely that they will be bulldozed for condos and I believe and hope these houses will be part of our community for a long time to come

    • Alex April 4, 2018, 10:10 am

      Hey Bill! Thanks for stopping by I’m glad that you found us. I just sent you an email because we’d love to do an update on this story if you’re interested!

  • Bill April 2, 2018, 10:40 pm

    I’d like to add one more comment to some of the speculation. Although it is true water got inside them about three feet high (and they are two feet off the ground) and water did damage the modern sheet rock, the original 1920s wooden structures were perfectly intact in terms of footings and framing and not structurally impaired at all. After pointing this out to the town we got engineering approval that they had not been destroyed by Sandy and were able to renovate in place, by installing new roofs windows and doors and bathrooms. The design concept was “flood ready/water friendly “so we avoided using sheet rock and insulation other than close cell spray foam on each structure (which is waterproof insulation) , Everything else was essentially paint and finishes to bring back the original wood surfaces. If we experience another Sandy we can sustain up to 4 feet of water inside and other than drying them out will have very little to do in terms of actual repairs to get them running again

    They have passed every level of inspection from the state and town, and while global warming will eventually push tide levels ever higher- and we do frequently get tidal flooding in the streets Up to and on the sidewalks during stormy high tides,- we think we’re going to be in a good position for many years before we have to worry further about this particular buildings.

    • Alex April 4, 2018, 10:12 am

      Thanks so much for the update Bill! If you’re at all interested in doing another story to update we would love that. I just sent you an email!

  • Jennifer July 7, 2018, 10:27 pm

    Keep the Highlands working class. It is one of the finest areas.

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