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Completed Robinson Dragonfly Tiny House on Wheels

This is the Robinson Dragonfly tiny house on wheels. You probably remember seeing the model, now you can see the completed build!

From the outside, you’ll notice a modern look and feel with two built-in fold out decks on both sides.

When you go inside, you’ll find a living area, kitchen, bathroom, and a sleeping loft. Some unique features are large sliding glass doors, a hiding ladder to get up to the loft, a pull-out dining table, a couch that converts to a bed for additional sleeping, and more. Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Completed Robinson Dragonfly Tiny House on Wheels

001 Completed Robinson Dragonfly THOW EXTERIOR

Images © RobinsonPlans.com

002 Completed Robinson Dragonfly THOW DINING

003 LIVINGROOM

004 BEDROOM TWO

005 BEDROOM 0NE

006 KITCHEN ONE

007 KITCHEN TWO

008 BATHROOM

009 OFFICE

0010 HEATER

0011 DECK

Images © RobinsonPlans.com

If you love these plans, good news! You can buy the plans.

Video: Robinson Dragonfly Tiny House Design

Resources

Our big thanks to John Robinson for sharing!

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 16 comments… add one }
  • Marcy March 22, 2016, 12:38 pm

    Wow! The fold out porch is cool, but what about that clever ladder/step system?! Wow.

  • Elizabeth Rubio March 22, 2016, 2:34 pm

    I have been an admirer of John Robinson’s plans for a number of years and was excited to see his tiny houses. As mentioned by Dr. Robinson above, the Dragonfly has heavy insulation, just as important in Minnesota as across our northern border. I hope more tiny house designs are forthcoming from Robinson Residential.

  • Laura March 22, 2016, 2:43 pm

    I love the design, my only concern is if you are traveling and need to stop and get in it, you wouldn’t always have enough space to drop porch in order to get inside.

    • AVD March 23, 2016, 2:14 pm

      While this design is certainly “mobile” and can be relocated from site to site, I wonder how may folks would actually use this particular design as a constantly moving / relocating unit.

      It would be interesting to know how often tiny houses built on trailer frames actually move. There are three “trailer parks” in my community with units that have not moved in over 50 years. The standard routine is that “trailers” are moved onto their “pad” and they never move again. Parked units are occupied by the original owner and then sold when the original owner becomes too old or ill to live in a trailer unit or dies. And the cycle of in-place living re-starts.

      With the popularity of tiny houses, one would think that a great topic for a Masters Degree or PHD thesis would address the topic of “Real vs Perceived Unit Relocation Habits of Tiny House Buyers”. Such a study might actually alter the entire Tiny House industry.

      Additional “data” could be collected that addresses the wide variation in how communities address issues such as:
      Property Taxes
      Taxation differences for fixed vs mobile units
      Zoning requirements for permanently-fixed vs wheeled trailer units
      Zoning requirements for permanently-fixed vs wheeled trailer units to qualify as “in-law / ADU” units
      Building code requirements for fixed vs wheeled trailer units and for units used as rentals vs owner-occupied.
      Utility connection requirements
      Impact of restrictive development covenants. Covenants can actually trump zoning laws if the development covenants are more restrictive.

  • Cosy March 22, 2016, 3:53 pm

    I really love this one!

  • Allin March 22, 2016, 5:37 pm

    Congrats! This outstanding…

  • AVD March 22, 2016, 8:58 pm

    Just curious – where does the outside combustion air for the small wood stove heater come from? I did not see an exterior air-intake port in the photos.

    • John Robinson March 23, 2016, 9:49 am

      The heater is a propane heater. The air intake comes in from the roof and it encases the exhaust vent, keeping the outside of the pipe cool. It has a small viewing window and a fan to spread the heat around.

  • Mike March 22, 2016, 10:16 pm

    A lot going on in a smaller tiny home, yet it’s still personable.

    This is one you wouldn’t want to allow any clutter as it would get muddy fast. I’d work on making the inside as clean a design as the outside. A little larger (longer) model might help.

    Still – the bar is being set higher and higher. Tiny living is becoming a viable lifestyle for more and more people.

  • Kathy March 23, 2016, 11:28 am

    Beautiful…

  • alice h March 23, 2016, 4:21 pm

    I could picture spending a lot of time on that couch, admiring the view. Love the pullout stairs. Would also love having my very own drawbridge to pull up when the barbarians invaded, er, uninvited guests arrived.

  • ct petersel June 22, 2016, 12:55 pm

    lovely design, certainly for very spare living. finally 2 exits, which should be required for safety reasons in the case of fire or other reasons. but concerned about blockage of doors if one does not want or cannot lower a deck for some reason for quick entry, perhaps weather other situation makes lowering decks cumbersome or difficult. maybe a simple door in bathroom wall for quick entry or exit as needed. stair design is wonderful, but might need tweaking for some. really beautiful for basic design. thanking you for posting this, another free-thinking design for tiny houses.

    • Sandi B June 23, 2016, 12:37 am

      Yes, it is good to see 2 exits, but one should really be forward and then the other aft. That would be a safer option.

  • Michael June 22, 2016, 6:34 pm

    I like this modern design including the fold out porch.
    A canvas roof above it would makes it more usable.
    A second door accessible when under way is always an advantage.
    For weight distribution I would put bathroom forward and gain more air in the living area. But this is a personal taste because I would not go for a loft and storage is better at a double floor.
    Well done John Robinson

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