Tiny Yurt Cabin: Little House in the Round

I love all sorts of small house designs and this one really caught my attention because it’s a mixture of a cabin and a yurt.

It’s especially unique in that it’s a round structure and to me it just defines simplicity.

There’s something about it too that makes me feel peaceful. And I don’t think it’s just me.

I think there’s really something special about structures like these.

The company that makes it is called Rotunda and I really love the idea behind their creation which I’ll share with you below.

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I encourage you to enjoy the rest of the tour of this tiny yurt cabin below (I think you’ll be really impressed with the bathroom):

Bathroom

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Looks pretty incredible, doesn’t it?

“Circular buildings naturally promote the flow of positive energy and are beautiful, restful and productive spaces in which to spend your time. There are plenty of Modular Buildings available in the UK but there really isn’t anything quite like having your own personal Rotunda. (Of this, we can promise you!)

This is an iconic little building which is designed primarily to promote human well being, eliminate harmful toxins in construction and promote the conservation and protection of our natural environment. Whether you’d use yours as a creative environment, classroom, outdoor retreat or garden studio, we like to think of this as a building with a soul; designed to nourish you and your creativity.” (Source)

Tiny Yurt Cabin Interior

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Little Round Cabin: Dream Catcher

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More photos of small structures built by Rotunda are available here.

If you also found this tiny yurt cabin inspiring, “Like” and share using the buttons below then tell us how you’d use a tiny house like this one in the comments because we’d all love to read your ideas, too.

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   Tiny Yurt Cabin: Little House in the Round

Alex

Alex has been living in small spaces for more than 7 years, he's the founding editor of TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter, and has passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. Send in your story and tiny home photos so we can share and inspire others towards simplicity too. Thank you!

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{ 15 comments }

  • Cahow July 28, 2013, 10:23 am

    I see the appeal, Alex. Very holistic.

    I spent an extensive amount of time on their website (U.K.), saw all their photos and sizes. Beautifully crafted and 10 year warrantee. However, unless it’s buried somewhere, I could NOT find a single floor plan ANYWHERE on the site; I was looking for one to see how they incorporated that crackin’ nice loo that you featured.

    I did conversions for the U.S. crowd:

    Smallest Unit: 9.84′ round, $24,262.00.
    Largest Unit: 19.68′ round, $65,856.00.

    You’d really need a pretty penny in your savings account to buy one of these, and that’s if you lived in the U.K., where they are created and sold.

    NO WHERE on the site is it suggested that they become “tiny homes”. They are pitched as “dance studio; classroom; therapy studio; and meditation space.” I could easily see a slew of these in Sedona, used as massage lounges, chill out spaces, and meditation spots.

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    • R. K. MacPherson July 29, 2013, 8:03 am

      No, they don’t market them as houses, but I agree it wouldn’t be hard to adapt them. If nothing else, it might inspire someone working on their own tiny home design–and that’s never a bad thing. Fascinating idea. Thanks!

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    • carrie adams July 30, 2013, 11:10 pm

      Beautifully made!!! that said, I agree on the cost being a bit high. Again we do get what we pay for…and the pics of the workmanship look insane! Love them.

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      • SteveR August 1, 2013, 9:02 am

        I see the board and batten siding on it is made of larch but it contains sapwood. The sapwood of any species is vulnerable to decay after relatively short periods of time. For the money, you should be asking for all heartwood siding.

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  • jerryd August 1, 2013, 3:58 pm

    I’m sorry but this has far more in common with feed silos than Yurts. It’s a rather US design used for over a century.. The roof design too is old design.

    A yurt is lightweight, made with wood slats and skins/fabric. Any of that here?

    And round homes are not as space eff and I find little good in the bath which is too big for such a small place. Also doing the roof is a pain and wasteful of materials as is the floor.

    While doable, certainly not on the top of my list. It only has looks though that will sell it to many.

    Reply Link
  • Gemma August 3, 2013, 5:23 pm

    Hi Steve, thanks for your comment re: Sapwood. As an ethical company we choose only to use local timber and we don’t like to waste any part of the tree – especially the removal of the bark. I have double-checked with the sawmill and the British Larch we use (even the sapwood) is just about as durable as the Heartwood, the high resin content is great for exterior applications. We are always looking for ways to improve so will always keep researching the most durable methods of cladding. Jerry, we are really keen to prove how effective a round footprint can be, the circular structure requires 30% fewer building materials per m2 of floor area vs a rectilinear structure and is much more efficient to build – just takes a little more engineering. Thanks for comments, it’s great to get feedback from over the pond. Thanks ALEX for this – we’re honoured to appear on your site! :)

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    • Alex August 3, 2013, 10:56 pm

      Thanks Gemma! :)

      Reply Link
  • LaMar Alexander LaMar January 16, 2014, 2:28 pm

    This again should probably be considered a Hogan design because of the flattened walls instead of a Yurt or Dome. Great wood work and detail though it does not seem to include a sleeping area ?

    Tatami mats or roll up mattresses would be nice.

    LaMar

    Reply Link
    • Alex Pino January 16, 2014, 2:45 pm

      Thanks LaMar!

      Reply Link
  • Glema January 16, 2014, 5:35 pm

    Hello Everyone,
    Just a quick ty Alex for showing this and a question to Gemma if I may. Where did you find that shower? Personally, I am more interested in the wheeled type of TH, yet I love to see the other tiny abodes and for the ideas that run through my mind for incorporation of the planned future TH I am dreaming of are always appreciated. Happy Trails, Glema

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  • Lisa E. May 23, 2014, 2:31 pm

    This is beautifully done. If I were to do it, though, I’d make it taller and add a spiral staircase leading to a top floor loft/bedroom; more privacy and more footage for half the price.

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  • Jacki M July 14, 2014, 5:31 pm

    Very cute! Love the washroom idea. We are currently looking at a yurt for our family of 6 once we are done in the military. I will keep this washroom design in mind.

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  • Rhonda L. August 14, 2014, 11:33 pm

    Very pretty and love the bathroom. It is clearly a studio. I would like to see how you would incorporate a kitchen and bedroom.

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  • Martha August 15, 2014, 6:29 pm

    Plenty of people live in yurts.
    I have a small one in my backyard that I use as my studio. It is indeed a wonderful peaceful feeling spending time there. And definitely I hope to end up in a tiny house – whether yurt or more conventional TH is not yet clear. California yurts is the company I used for my studio.
    Enjoyed the views of this one. Thanks.

    Reply Link
  • Bil October 8, 2014, 3:08 am

    i love these cabins, i’d like to put one in our garden for guests to stay in. does anyone know if the local council would allow this?

    Reply Link

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