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Rae Rickman’s 8×12 Tiny House Floor Plan

Rae Rickman has shared this 8×12 tiny house floor plan as part of our 2015 8×12 tiny house design contest.


It’s a tiny house with a full size basement, skylights, and stained glass windows in the kitchen and bathroom which I absolutely love.

There’s also a wall you can use for your own projector if you want to watch films. In addition, there’s a fold away bed for your guests.

And when you go upstairs to the master loft you can enjoy panoramic views. What do you think?


Rae Rickman’s 8×12 Tiny House Floor Plan

rae-rickmans-8x12-tiny-house-floor-plan-01

Image © Rae Rickman

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!




{ 10 comments… add one }
  • Deborah Gutierrez April 3, 2015, 1:22 am

    I absolutely love this design! Its not only functional, it utilizes every inch of space both above and below, and is so innovative! Very ingenious!

  • Sammie April 3, 2015, 1:48 am

    I absolutely love this design that showcases my daughter’s talent. She has included the small luxuries and essential features that make a house a home.

  • Mary Ann April 4, 2015, 5:16 pm

    I like this design, especially how it uses corner spaces. But I can’t seem to locate the stairs to the loft. Also I get the ying/yang but do the dots signify a raised or lowered flooring? The W/D is approx. 13″ x 18″. Is this correct? And I can’t seem to find where the guest bed is located. But overall, circles and curves are very attractive and this design brings a “softer” feeling than current TH with squares and pointed edges. Good work incorporating a different concept.

    • Rae Rickman April 5, 2015, 2:43 am

      Thank you, Mary Ann! I’m definitely not a professional. I took an architectural graphics class in high school and that’s about the extent of my experience. I mainly just doodle, and this is the first draft I’ve attempted being this small in dimension. Most of mine are within the 400 – 1200 square foot range.

      The dotted area would be the second floor with panoramic views, and I know that with a few readjustments you could incorporate stairs. My initial thought was a ladder though – unless you might want to have another designated area for entry into the basement. I guess it could even be an external entrance in theory. The ladder is actually located by the washer which was supposed to be 2′ x 2′ (sorry!). That was the smallest washer/dryer combo that I’ve been able to find. I intentionally left the bed out as it could potentially be placed anywhere along the southern curved wall. To save even more space, I’ve seen beds that also serve as a couch when not pulled down. When you pull the bed down, the back part of the couch collapses underneath the bed. I think I might have even seen that on this site? While some you see on websites are a bit pricey, you could hire local talent at a much more cost effective price.

      Thank you again for your compliments and your interest in my design! Feel free to use it and make it your own if you’d like (along with any necessary recalculations, of course). If you do, though, share pictures!

  • Joyce April 5, 2015, 10:46 am

    I agree it is difficult to determine which space is upper or lower level. Having two images to separate the layouts would be helpful. In this case 3 since a loft is mentioned with a master bedroom. It appears each square represents 6 inches. I was not able to see a refrigerator under counter but thought I read letters to show dishwasher under counter. I see “manual garage door”–does that mean an opening for lower level (basement)? If so, then how do you access each level? Anytime you can build with a full or even partial basement, you get added space and a cooler place to lounge in summer or a warmer place in winter. Basements are safer in most seasons other than flooding.

  • Marsha Cowan April 5, 2015, 7:52 pm

    Pretty doggone cool!

  • jannezack April 6, 2015, 10:06 am

    Basement? Loft? I see no explination of how to get to either.
    Round counters/cabinets…. super expensive. This is not a very practical use of spaces…. to build circles inside a rectangle leaves space left over… even though you can clutter up the back corners of closets, there are thousands of wasted square inches and in a structure this size, every inch counts.

    Now, if there were really an easily accessible basement, WOW, I could do millions with that! If height were not limited (such as on a trailer) again the sky is the limit (literally). I’d probably put my closet and bathroom in the basement, living on the main floor and bedroom upstairs on the 2nd floor, but the only problem with this is, the entire structure would be stairs/ladders.

    Too much stuff for such a small space. 8 x 12 is a challenge and not intended for so much stuff.

  • Rae Rickman April 6, 2015, 5:49 pm

    Well, as I’ve mentioned previously I’m not a professional at all guys. I just entered this contest for fun and to challenge myself being that I don’t have financial means to actually build anything. Thanks for all the critiques, though. I really appreciate it and I’ll take them all into consideration in future drafts. 😉

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