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Gudrun’s Modern THOW Office

This is Gudrun’s Modern THOW Office.

She is a Natural Hoof Care Specialist in Nova Scotia who uses this amazing tiny to observe horses and do her daily tasks.

Gudrun used Vina Lustado’s plans as her inspiration for this modern beach cottage THOW, which she adapted to her own style and needs. Enjoy!

Related: Student’s Rooftop Tiny Architecture Office

Gudrun’s Modern THOW Office

Images via Gudrun

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Images via Gudrun

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From Gudrun: 

I was in need of a peaceful, quiet, inspiring and flexible work space for my work on a professional book, to do field studies on horses and to do all my other office work. I have always been dreaming about an old beach cottage with an all white interior. So I have been mimicking old wide-plank boards for the floor, the walls and the ceiling with 1/4 plywood cut into 8″ wide boards. It was a lot of fun to invite the imperfection – the crookedness – that came along with it as a wonderful balance to the rest of the interior. My carpenter turned old hemlock floor boards from 1830 into my office desks and countertops. House plan from Vina Lustado, Solhausdesign. The building lives in Nova Scotia, Canada.

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Our big thanks to Gudrun for sharing!

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Scotland.
Natalie C. McKee

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{ 30 comments… add one }
  • AVD January 9, 2017, 6:13 pm

    Generally speaking, this is a decent blend of exterior and interior spaces and features. And there are some clever solutions that may work just fine.

    Tweaking some of the details and re-thinking the real-life day-to-day functionality of some design decisions and equipment selections can make this unit even more successful.
    AVD

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 10, 2017, 8:57 am

      Always room for improvement. But remember: it’s her office, not necessarily for full-time living. I’m sure she would change some things if it was a full-time dwelling. — Tiny House Talk Team

      • AVD January 10, 2017, 3:41 pm

        If it is truly her her office, then she might want to check with her accountant to see if her “vehicle” and some components qualify for a tax deduction rather than a capitalized business expense. Refer to IRS Section 179 Deduction to see if her unit qualifies. If it does, then that would be a huge $ boost.
        Mercedes Benz and other manufacturers (Ford, Dodge, Nissan) of certain classes of business vehicles are advertising that their vehicles qualify for an IRS Section 179 Deduction on 2016 taxes if the unit was purchased in 2016.

        Builders and trades people often use this noted class of vehicle in their business. The prospect is certainly worth considering.

        AVD

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 11, 2017, 8:17 am

          That’s interesting! I didn’t know. — Tiny House Talk Team

  • Large Marge January 9, 2017, 6:37 pm

    A suggestion:
    Some building codes for commercial areas require a cover over bulbs. An aggressive swing with a hair brush, a nice yawning stretch, a mop handle… this and more can burst a bulb, sending hundreds of shards into bedding, food, down your shirt.

    And you probably don’t want to sit on them.

    • FLTinyHome January 9, 2017, 6:55 pm

      Lights seem to be LED.

      • N.D. January 20, 2017, 8:50 am

        When we first went to LED we had bulbs blowing up all over the place. It had something to do with us being at the beginning of the line and therefore carried a bit more than the standard 240volts. LEDs ‘pop’ as easily as any other.

    • AVD January 9, 2017, 7:41 pm

      Good point about the bare bulbs. There are impact resistant LED bulbs that look very similar to the ones in the photos and have the same type of screw-in base. First check to see if the light output is comparable to the ones in the photos. If not, then step up a notch to a higher “equivalent wattage”.
      AVD

      • Large Marge January 10, 2017, 6:38 pm

        AVD,

        We avoid, and we advise our clients to avoid, LEDs.

        The LED blue light damage to the eye is irreversible.

        For this reason, our office only uses antique cathode tube computer monitors. And we limit exposure to smartphones and laptop computers.

        Repeat after me. Blue light from LEDs is blinding.

        • AVD January 10, 2017, 10:22 pm

          Reply to LM on LEDs
          We are fortunate enough to have LEDs that come in many “K” ratings. By staying in the lower K numbers, you can avoid your personal concern for the bright blue segment of the spectrum that many people do not like.
          The better lighting stores have test boxes or strips so you can compare LED K-rating choices.

          Most people would be amazed to see how skin tone, paint colors, finish material colors change when viewed under common artificial lighting sources of 2000k, 2700k, 3500k, 5000k and onward.

          People suffer badly from “ambient-flicker” associated with fluorescent lighting, cathode ray tube monitors and old televisions that use CRT technology.

          Some people who suffer from SAD actually become better people when they are exposed to the benefits of certain types and levels of “blue light”.

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 11, 2017, 8:02 am

          It is true you can get LEDs that aren’t blue — thank God! — we have some LED twinkle lights in our home right now that are the same beautiful yellow of a standard Christmas light. So nice, and not so painful to look at 🙂 — Tiny House Talk Team

        • jm January 11, 2017, 9:23 am

          I don’t know where all this “blue light from LEDs” is coming from. Light has Kelvin temperature ratings. I think 5000 is around natural sunlight. These have been proven to lessen SAD syndrome. They are also used as grow light for plants. Any modern monitor today can be adjusted for whatever kelvin one desires. Photographers and graphic artists do it all the time by calibration.
          Cathode tubes actually put out some terrible amounts of electromagnetic radiation at the close range of PCs. Remember how they told children not to sit close to the TV? But then, some people think that windows xp will never be beat!

  • beachgal January 9, 2017, 6:42 pm

    Is the Tub home built? If not where was it purchased?
    How about the faucet combo never saw that set up before…
    Could the builder please tell me where this faucet was purchased..
    Nice Tub option!

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 10, 2017, 8:56 am

      You can try and get in touch with Gudrun through her website which we provided under “Resources” 🙂 — Tiny House Talk Team

  • Michael January 9, 2017, 7:03 pm

    It provides plenty of light and appears bigger than it is. Synthesis with the reclaimed wood provides a warm interior. The loft offers low headroom only and ladders aren’t my thing. The exterior is less exiting but clear. Not bad.

  • ZACHARY E. MOHRMANN January 9, 2017, 9:04 pm

    Very bright, with all that white…! I like the layout though….

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 10, 2017, 8:49 am

      Me too! I am a fan of darker colors, but she made it work! — Tiny House Talk Team

  • Susanne January 9, 2017, 10:41 pm

    I personally just could not have wood in the bathroom …

  • M January 10, 2017, 12:50 am

    I’d like to know more about the ‘bathtub’…looking for similar natural solution. What is size and type of wood? Thanks

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 10, 2017, 8:45 am

      You can probably contact Gudrun through her website (the horse one). I don’t have any details on it personally. — Tiny House Talk Team

  • jm January 10, 2017, 4:53 am

    I like it a lot. But sometimes I question the big wood stove in such a small confined space. For cold climates I would probably build a super-insulated house that can be heated by appliances and bulbs.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 10, 2017, 8:42 am

      There’s nothing quite like the feel/smell of a wood stove, though. It’s magical! Electric bulbs and appliance just don’t say “cozy.” — Tiny House Talk Team

    • AVD January 10, 2017, 1:35 pm

      Wood stove and bathroom with wood reply:
      I really like the wood tub. If properly designed and built, it can last for many years. There are or were hot-spring bath houses in Oregon that used big hollowed out Western Red Cedar logs for the soaking tubs and “V” shaped “gutters” that supplied very hot water to each tub. If any of these outback venues still exist, the tubs would be nearly 100 years old.

      Painted wood paneled walls in the bathroom seems like a really bad choice from a health, sanitation, and maintenance perspective.

      The concerns raised about the wood stove are spot on. The stove is very nice and probably vary expensive. But it looks way too large for the space and will likely put out so much heat that the owner will have to open windows to keep the space comfortable.

      The wood stove, located in a bump-out seating alcove would be very nice in a non-THOW unit. The flue appears to only be braced in one direction. That seems like a problem for a unit that may be hauled down the highway at 50mph. The flue may decide to mate with the windshield of a vehicle following behind Gudrun’s THOW.
      AVD

  • Kevin January 10, 2017, 6:23 am

    That multifunction bathroom is a clever way how to integrate a sink and shower into one unit.

    Wood stoves are not too common in homes on wheels. The main reason (aside from space issues): the act of moving the structure can cause joint issues in the flue, which might be very dangerous when later heating with the stove. As a suggestion, always properly inspect the flue after moving the home, or better, detach the flue from the stove before moving, then re-install after arriving at the new location. Stay safe. 🙂

  • jm January 11, 2017, 9:32 am

    Wood stoves and fireplaces are very bad for your respiratory health. Sorry to say as I like fire too–but not enough to inhale the smoke that is as bad as cigarette smoke–or worse. A woodburning fireplace also cools the extremities of the house by drawing in cold air for combustion. ONLY if the stove is air tight AND gets piped outside air for combustion can you maybe get away with it. But then you still have to open it to feed it. Yeah, the more we learn the less romantic it is. Gee, ever wonder why we use modern furnices and bathrooms instead of outhouses…

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 12, 2017, 8:33 am

      Even if it’s true (although I’ve never had an respiratory issues and I’ve lived in a home with a wood burning stove for nearly 15 years), I just love a woodburning stove 🙂

  • ROSEE January 11, 2017, 1:32 pm

    I like the clean and modern style of this TH, especially the area of the wood stove. My opinion of the bright white, it could be toned down a bit with some light cream color. The only thing I’m not fond of is the wooden tub/shower part. Everything else looks great.

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