≡ Menu

The Little Owl Tiny House


This is the story of Tone’s La Couette (Little Owl) Tiny House on Wheels in Norway.

I have travelled for years and have thought for a while about getting a camping-van. I don’t like the look of ordinary trailers though, so I decided to build my own house on wheels, accommodated to my likes and needs.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thanks!

She Designed and Built Her Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer

Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer 001

Images © Tone Wasbak Melbye

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 001

Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer 002

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 002

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 003

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 004

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 005

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 006

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 007

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 008

The Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer in Norway 009

Little Owl Tiny House on a Trailer 004

Images © Tone Wasbak Melbye

Interview with the Tiny Home Owner

What’s your name?

Tone Wasbak Melbye.

Where are you from?

Norway.

How did you first become seriously interested in tiny houses?

I have traveled for years and have thought for a while about getting a camping-van. I don’t like the look of ordinary trailers though, so I decided to build my own house on wheels, accommodated to my likes and needs.

What type of tiny house do you have or are you working on?

It’s a house on wheels, built on a trailer, 14×6.5 feet. She’s called La Couette, the little owl.

Why did you go tiny? What are you hoping to get out of it for yourself?

I need to be mobile while surrounded by things and materials that I find comfortable. I have built the main frame in cedar-wood and insulated with hemp, keeping things light, fragrant and just on the border between indoors and outdoors. I prefer the borders and the in-between-places. I dislike the layout and materials of most modern houses. They are created for machines and things, not for moving and living in. They often have a lot of ‘dead space’, room that is there only to be filled with needless items. And the walls are much too heavy, creating an oppressive atmosphere. I wanted somewhere built for my body, not for machines.

How long did it take you to finish your tiny house?

I started planning and drawing a year ago, in October last year, started building as soon as spring came, in April this year and I have just moved it to its first ground and started to live in it.

Did you do it yourself? Who helped? How much did it end up costing you to build it?

Yes, I did everything myself. I spent about 150 000kr, about 15000 euro.

How did you figure out where to put it?

I suppose this question is meant for stationary houses, but I hope to find places to park near the forest, and in temperate climates here and there.

What’s been the most challenging part about going tiny so far?

Heating. I have no electricity or running water, so I have to adjust and make adjustments to find ways of keeping the heat. I have a wood-burning fireplace that works well during the daytime, but the nights can be cold. I’m working on the balance of keeping the house airy, but warm, making air circulation work for me instead of against me.

What benefits are you experiencing after going tiny?

I own my days, my own movements, everything I do has a clear purpose, and there is a calmness in the daily routines that I have not experienced in the larger houses I have lived in. Also, I can move the house, if I get too cold, too warm or feel my surroundings becoming overly uncomfortable in other ways.

What helpful piece of advice would you give to others who are interested in going tiny?

Know your needs. How do you spend your days, what do you do and what do you want to do. How do you move in the space where you live, how would you like to move? What do you like looking at, touching, smelling, a tiny house is a concentrated sensual experience. Everything has meaning, everything has purpose. Spend time finding out what works for you.

Do you have a website, blog, or social media pages where we can connect with you and follow along?

Yes, it’s https://owldwell.com/, and I drop by Instagram now and then, as twmelbye.

***

Our big thanks to Tone Wasbak Melbye for sharing!🙏

You can share this using the e-mail and social media re-share buttons below. Thanks!

If you enjoyed this you’ll LOVE our Free Daily Tiny House Newsletter with even more!

You can also join our Small House Newsletter!

Also, try our Tiny Houses For Sale Newsletter! Thank you!

More Like This: Tiny Houses | THOW | Interviews

See The Latest: Go Back Home to See Our Latest Tiny Houses

The following two tabs change content below.

Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

Latest posts by Alex (see all)

Facebook Comments

comments




{ 1 comment… add one }
  • Wiz Zard November 27, 2018, 6:46 pm

    Just beautiful!
    And where ever did you find that fabulous dragon on the walls? Is it wall paper or print or drawings??

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.



Next post:

Previous post: