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The K2 Tiny House by Tiny Idahomes


This is the K2 Tiny House by Tiny Idahomes.

It’s a 26-foot THOW that starts at $48,950. Get the full tour and learn more below. Enjoy!

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The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes

The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes

Images © Tiny Idahomes

The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes The K2 Tiny House on Wheels by Tiny Idahomes

Images © Tiny Idahomes

  • 26′ long exterior dimensions by 8’6″ total width that includes roof overhang and total height of 13’5″ tall which includes the trailer of 2′ from the ground.
  • The roof will be A frame roof style in the center, with peak dormers in the lofts
  • Standing seam metal roof, color choice of customer https://www.treasurevalleysteel.com/products/find-your-color.html
  • Insulation is blown in fiberglass batt and as follows R-13 floor, R-15 walls, and R-15 ceiling.
  • Board and Bat smart soffit siding or V-Groove (Painted to color of customer choice). Color sample or color match number required from customer
  • Front door is 36″x80” inswing, 6 panel door.
  • Windows are white vinyl, sliding type, and will have a 3-1/2” exterior trim around windows, Color sample or color match number required from customer 1-14″x39″ obscured window (bathroom) 1-24”x39” (Kitchen) 1-24”x39” (Next to front door) 2-30″x36″ (loft area) 4-62x26x14 peak window (2 each loft) 1-46″x39″ (Dining area) 1-46”x39” (Den) 2-24”x58” (Den)
  • Floor is to be one-piece vinyl from congoleum http://congolasalleflooring.com/?page_id=207 –. We do not recommend or warranty real wood flooring because it expands and contracts with the different climates an RV may see.
  • All interior walls and ceiling to be pine tongue and groove with clear coat, bead board or painted plywood with seams every 4’ (color chosen by the customer)
  • Stairs to the loft are Pine, custom built, and as close to code as possible.
    8’ rear loft, with Peak dormer ceiling, located above bathroom/kitchen. Standard ceiling height under the loft is 6’6” and loft height is roughly 4’. Standard loft lighting are 2 wall lights with 3-way switch for control at bottom and top of stairs. Will have a total 2, 15amp outlets in loft one on each side wall. Loft floor is pine tongue and groove, clear coated
  • 4’ Rear bathroom with a 3” toilet drain, ½” toilet water connection, outlet for future composting toilet (composting toilet not provided), regular porcelain toilet and a 48” one-piece fiberglass shower and no shower door. Two-Handle Tub and Shower Faucet in brushed nickel. Mirrored medicine cabinet. Small sink with cabinet below, 2 handle sink faucet in brushed nickel.
  • Mid kitchen with a 24”, deep single basin stainless steel sink, a 21” drop in range, in black, with a 3 burner cooktop and a 24’ black range hood with fan mounted above. Kitchen will have 4 outlets. 9 cu. ft., stainless steel refrigerator. Kitchen will have 1 track light.
  • All kitchen cabinets to be Home Depot Hampton Bay or Lowe’s in stock, pre-assembled base and upper cabinets. (includes 1-12” lower cabinets, 2-18” upper cabinet, 1-18” lower, 1-30” upper cabinets and 1-36” sink cabinet.)
  • Counter top is in stock laminate premade from Home Depot or Lowe’s.
    8’ Front loft, with Peak dormer ceiling, located above Den. Standard ceiling height under the loft is 6’6” and loft height is roughly 4’. Standard loft lighting are 2 wall lights with 3-way switch for control at main level. Will have a total 2, 15amp outlets in loft one on each side wall. Loft floor is pine tongue and groove, clear coated
  • 8’ Front Den area with 24” pocket door
  • Lighting in den area will be 2 wall sconces placed on the front wall
  • Prep for ceiling fan, centered in living space.
  • 30-amp RV connection and 30-amp RV 12-volt power converted panel.
  • 3″ RV twist drain connection, hose water connection plumbing pipe will be Pex with chrome handles and fittings.
  • Propane 6-gallon tanked water heater mounted under kitchen sink with access door on outside wall
  • 1 – 120-volt 1200w electric wall heater mounted in living area.

Learn more: https://tinyidahomes.com/Model_K2.html

Our big thanks to Jesse Collinsworth of Tiny Idahomes for sharing!🙏

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 10 comments… add one }
  • Lisa D. Lucas
    June 12, 2019, 2:36 pm

    Very nicely done. I have questions about a couple of things, though.
    I have noticed the tendency of builders to start their loft ceiling bump ups stepped back from the edge of the loft floor. It seems to me that it would be much more comfortable to transition from the top step onto the floor if you had a bit more headroom. Is there a structural reason why this happens?
    Wouldn’t alternating treads be easier to negotiate that the steep rise and shallow tread as built?
    Again, though – very nicely done.

    • James D.
      June 13, 2019, 1:49 am

      Everything has trade offs… In this case the architecture is tied to the outward appearance of the home and that conflicts with optimizing the interior layout when exterior symmetry has to be maintained… Plus every design choice will invariably involve a compromise/trade-off when multiple considerations are involved…

      Namely, the dormers only provide a limited bump out that doesn’t span the whole loft and is tied to the window placement, which may be required for emergency egress. So can’t both make it easy to get in and out of the loft and benefit the actual use of the loft… Other roof options can avoid this but would give the house a very different look…

      While alternating steps is one of those things not everyone can easily adapt to and some will even find hazardous until they can develop the muscle memory for the pattern of the steps, but as these are custom built not everyone will choose them…

      • Alex
        June 13, 2019, 10:03 am

        “every design choice will invariably involve a compromise/trade-off when multiple considerations are involved…”

        Well said! This is especially the case in tiny homes! Thanks for explaining this for us, James!

        • Eric
          October 20, 2021, 3:35 pm

          Seems like he has been saying this forever. But there’s always new people to the site so it bears repeating. As a (wannabe) sailor I can attest to that statement of not everybody can develop the muscle memory, and I have seen some really nasty injuries from people making mistakes. Wasn’t one of my failings, mine was motion sickness.

  • Doris clatfelter
    October 20, 2021, 2:06 pm

    Cute home. A couple things I would wish were different. The living area more open concept rather than being a closed room, railing going up the stairs for older people, The 2 white areas on the front of the house. They stick out like a sore thumb. The back side of the house is very nice. Could something be done to flip so the house entry was not cluttered with vents or whatever those items are. Or maybe painted the house color to hide them some. Kitchen area very nice and other than no glass in for the shower nice bathroom.

    • James D.
      October 21, 2021, 1:59 am

      The living room is actually a multi-purpose room, like you could use it as a bedroom or office space… It’s just staged as a living room for the photos they took.

      While they’re a custom builder, so if you commissioned them to build one then they’ll make it however you prefer it… They just usually cater to those who are looking for, lack of a better description, a hybrid Tiny House/RV and are even RVIA certified…

      So many of their builds would include RV furnaces, electrical panels, water heaters, etc. and they can also offer slide outs and other RV type modifications… They’ve even done a cabin style toy hauler for a wheelchair bound client…

  • Eric
    October 20, 2021, 3:38 pm

    That box thingy at the bottom of the stairs is a MAJOR hazard. Who thought that was a good idea?

    • James D.
      October 21, 2021, 1:38 am

      That’s the wheel well, which they can’t move… So it’s a compromise to get the layout they wanted…

      However, it’s not much of a hazard because you’d generally be moving to and from the center walkway when accessing the stairs, which should provide a wide enough berth to avoid the wheel well, as well as the fire extinguisher…

      I’d be more concerned about the top of the stairs… No standing platform and the gabled roof means you’re going to be leaning out over the edge of the loft as you transition to and from the loft and trying to keep your balance at the same time as you move along the stairs at the same time as you’re transitioning between a standing position on the stairs to a crawling position in the loft…

  • Eric
    October 21, 2021, 2:46 am

    OK, its the wheel well. Explain the two relatively large grooves, one front and one side. Are they strengthening of the structure?

    On other points I like the safety deposit box(?), the 6 bottle wine fridge, and the chopping block food prep whatever thing. Also the space around the cooktop, for me, would have to be larger. Yeah I know, its not my build, but what I’d have, and totally agree with you the space entering the bedroom would be, at the very least, challenging.

    • James D.
      October 21, 2021, 12:31 pm

      Yes, wheel wells get covered for reasons like re-enforcing them and giving them some structural strength, as well as providing a thermal break to lessen their impact on the insulation, and also to integrate them into the trim style used on the interior of the home to better make them appear part of everything as they invariably stick out unless covered by something else like a couch or the whole kitchen, etc.

      While, if you’re referring to what’s next to the wine fridge, that’s the electrical service panel… This builder often caters to clients who may want to occasionally use their Tiny House like an RV/Caravan. So they often use RV/Caravan components in their build instead of all residential, as well as optionally offer feature like slide outs, toy hauler functionality, etc. and all their builds are RVIA certified…

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