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Farallon 20 Alta Tiny House

This is the Farallon 20 Alta Tiny House.

It’s designed and built by Tumbleweed Houses.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Farallon 20 Alta Tiny House

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© Tumbleweed Houses

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© Tumbleweed Houses

Specifications

  • 148 sq. ft. downstairs
  • 71 sq. ft. loft
  • 219 sq. ft. total usable space
  • Sleeps two
  • 8’6″ house width
  • 20′ trailer bed size
  • 13’4″ house height
  • 6’6″ ceiling height
  • 3’6″ loft height
  • 9,800 lbs dry weight
  • $30,000 in materials to DIY (your labor)
  • $61,000 to buy from Tumbleweed Houses

Please learn more using the resources below. Thanks.

Resources

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 9 comments… add one }
  • DAvid August 27, 2016, 4:00 pm

    I would never pay 61k for this place. A big rip off.

  • alice h August 27, 2016, 10:16 pm

    Nice enough but the layout doesn’t work for me. I’m not a fan of the “hallway” houses where everything is built in on either side with a narrow walkway between. It’s hard to avoid with an end doorway.

  • Maria August 28, 2016, 8:10 am

    Too much wasted space. Would have liked to have seen more pictures of bathroom instead of just the sink. In the kitchen I would remove the book shelf and desk. I like the stairs to loft.

  • Trish Dee August 28, 2016, 2:38 pm

    I really like the exterior, but the interior leaves a lot to be desired. It seems very cramped from the photos. I do like the bathroom sink. Having the faucet offset makes more sense than the centered ones. I also like the cubbies.

  • Robert Aulicky August 28, 2016, 2:55 pm

    I am trying to follow the floor layout and am having trouble with the lower bedroom and bathroom combo. I like my friends but not that much. With 20′ there seems not to be enough room for guests and everyday living. I too am not a fan of the galley kitchen. Try this on a 24′ and a side entry instead of a rear.

    I would also like to know more about the construction to justify the cost in materials. If you used fiberglass insulation instead of foam, etc.

    Thanks for the peek.

    Robert

  • Kathleen August 28, 2016, 9:44 pm

    A lot of THOW’s, and especially this one, have very little, if any, overhang from the roof. I assume that’s to get as much space as possible inside without needing a permit as an over-wide vehicle when moving them. Does anyone know if the lack of overhang, and therefore no protection from rain or snow, affects the longevity of the outside walls? Foundation-built houses usually have a lot more overhang to protect the walls from water. Just wondering if I’m worrying about nothing.

  • jm August 29, 2016, 4:44 pm

    PLenty of houses, especially modern style, have no overhang. If they are built correctly then no proble,. But I LIKE overhangs for so many reasons. I like the windows to be open when it rains–especially when it is hot. Or when I am not home. Overhangs, when properly designed, can keep the summer rays out while allowing the winter rays in. The walls are already waterproof and need no protection from overhangs.

    Cost is relative to so many factors that it almost is not worth discussing. A lot of work goes into these houses that is not always reflected by the square footage or material costs. In the end, you can just take it or leave it–or make a counter offer.

    For me there is a lot to like about this house. Almost has a nautical feel to it–like a fine sailing boat. Nice wood workmanship.

  • KC August 30, 2016, 2:30 pm

    I like this house – a lot.
    The woodwork is lovely and the galley kitchen fantastic.
    I’d likely alter the sofa but that’s a decoration preference rather than a structural issue.
    Unfortunately, there photos of the bathroom are not offered in this listing;
    I would likely be living in this house if there had been.
    $61,000 seems more than reasonable to me.

  • KC August 30, 2016, 2:31 pm

    I like this house – a lot.
    The woodwork is lovely and the galley kitchen fantastic.
    I’d likely alter the sofa but that’s a decoration preference rather than a structural issue.
    Unfortunately, photos of the bathroom are not offered in this listing;
    I would likely be living in this house if there had been.
    $61,000 seems more than reasonable to me.
    Read more at http://tinyhousetalk.com/farallon-20-alta-tiny-house/#PBCQLJFzuWr5sCzf.99

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