You love the idea of living in a tiny house so you can have a maintenance free lifestyle with super low expenses.

I do too, but where are you going to park it?

If you’re like most people you prefer living in an environment where you can easily get to places like a park, grocery store, work, and neighbors.

It’s nice to be able to hop over to a coffee shop or something when you don’t feel like being home. After all, your house is tiny so you might as well be pretty close to the places you like to go to.

Those are my beliefs anyway and I am sure you have your own.

Finding your space to build and park

If you are buying your house ready made you really only have to worry about one spot which is where you are going to park it and live in it.

If you’re building it yourself you need to have another place where you’re allowed to construct it. Lots of times this might be the same place.

Here are some general ideas where you can start looking…

  • Backyards where RV’s or sheds are allowed
  • Renting your own piece of land (more on this later)
  • RV parks
  • Run a free Craigslist WANTED ad
  • Newspaper classified WANTED ad
When posting on Craigslist I highly recommend using a photo of a tiny house so that potential land owners see what you’re working with and understand that they will not be having to look at an eye sore beat up travel trailer, etc.

Renting land or bartering with business owners is a great way to find a solution. And don’t forget to ask whoever you talk to if they know anybody else who might be up for the idea. I’ve found the best and most honest people to do business with just by asking person to person.

You can also search your local craigslist and look in your newspaper but I recommend for you to explore areas of interest to get a feel for everything and talk to people about what you’re doing.

A profitable tiny house situation

I think that the smartest solution is buying a house where you can park your tiny house in the yard. Then you rent the big house while you live in your little one. If you can do this you might find yourself in a position where you make a monthly profit from your living situation.

Overcoming obstacles

Your own doubts

You’re trying to do something that’s completely different than the average person so of course you’re going to encounter doubts and fears.

When you are trying build and live in your own tiny house you are going to face criticism. You are also going to inspire many as you build. And that’s when opportunities for parking your house usually manifest.

The most important thing you can do is keep a good attitude, ask the right questions to the right people and listen to your instincts. Avoid arguing about laws and instead focus on what you can get away with in your current situation. Generate that feeling within yourself where you know it’s all going to come together.

Whether that’s by focusing on the fact that it’s no different than an RV, small mother-in-law suite, or just a trailer with a valuable load on it that’s tucked away. Find your own spin for your situation and work through it.

Codes and zoning regulations

Arguing about stubborn code laws and regulations is not the right thing to do if you are trying to get your house built and lived in. These laws are the reason that the idea to build on a trailer has become so popular.

If you run into a situation where you literally must move, you can. And your next stop will be waiting for you.

Friends and family

Let’s face it some of your family and friends love your ideas for living simply while others think you have gone mad. This is expected.

If they are constantly bringing it up maybe they are a little bothered by the fact that you are doing something so drastically different and it has got them questioning themselves.

Bottom line is, don’t worry about it. It’s your life. They’ll live theirs and you’ll live yours.

Video Version

This is one of my first ever videos so take it easy on me! ;)

What are your thoughts? And if you are building one where do you think you’ll keep it? Speak your mind in the comments.

Share ==>facebook   How to Find Parking for Your Tiny Housetwitter   How to Find Parking for Your Tiny Houseemail   How to Find Parking for Your Tiny House
The following two tabs change content below.
   How to Find Parking for Your Tiny House

Alex

Alex has been living in small spaces for more than 7 years, he's the founding editor of TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter, and has passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. Send in your story and tiny home photos so we can share and inspire others towards simplicity too. Thank you!

Facebook Comments

comments


{ 73 comments }

  • Dawn Burton

    We have our small cabin on our 6 acres outside Palestine TX and have 4 spots with utilities that would be perfect for the tiny houses if anyone is looking for a beautiful peaceful place to rent.

    Reply
    • suzette smith

      Hello! I have 2 questions; how much would the rent be, and what is the weather like in Palestine?

      Thank you, Suzette

      Reply
      • Dawn Burton

        Suzette. The weather is up and down just like everywhere in TX. It has been a very mild winter. You may write me at msdawn @ msdawn dot com Rent is $350 including utilities and use of the bath house/laundry room if you need it. Make it your own home.

        Reply
      • Daniel Elliott

        I am looking for someone who might want to park their Tiny House on my property and perhaps help run the Hostel. I have gone back to school.
        The location is 400 yards from a River in the Ozark Mountains.
        Contact me for details.

        Daniel

        Reply
        • Shelly

          Daniel, my husband and I wanting to downsize in the very near future and weighing all our options. Could you tell me more about your property, location and your Hostel? I see that you are looking for someone to help run the Hostel and allowing someone to park a tiny home there. Would there be internet access, running water and electricity? It sounds very interesting to me. Where exactly are you located? Thanks so much for the info!

          Reply
  • Davidrc

    Well, if I were to take the time and my limited funding away from converting my 12′x24′ shed into my actually habitable cabin, I could probably find a place somewhere on my 4 acres to park it. I COULD even build a tiny house onto a barge type hull and ‘park’ it on my pond. I live in a heavily rural area (some would call it the woods) and we don’t have a lot of restrictions here. Drawback being not living in a heavily urbanized area where all those nifty conveniences you allude to are located. Oh well, I’m fairly happy where I’m at.

    Reply
  • Alex

    I’m not in the process of building yet because I’m staying in a 600 SF apartment with my office in it too (for now).

    I’m happy here because of the location.

    But if I were doing it now I’d move, build and park the house on my in-law’s property that’s on 2 or so acres. Only issue is I’d be 20-25 miles away from where I’d rather be. Haven’t explored other closer, possible neighborhoods in my area yet. Could be possible to do it closer….

    Reply
  • Davidrc

    Oh, guess I should have added that my family already thinks I’m nuts. But that goes WAY back and for far better reasons than my housing choices. My friends have mostly been accomplices and some are ‘crazier’ (or at least more extreme in their views) than I’ve ever been.

    Reply
  • Billy Wade Dalton

    I am about to retire in a couple of months and my project will begin in ernest. I was fortunate to find approximately four acres of property in the Ozark hills in northern Arkansas bordering Missouri. The land had electricity, water and telephone aready in place. Thats where my tiny house is going to set right on the bank of White Horse Mountain Lake. Cheap land is out there if you scrounge around in all the hidden corners of the market.
    Billy Wade Dalton

    Reply
  • gregor

    Great to see this important issues being ignored less, so kudos on having the guts to try to face the harder issues. I hope you’ll keep doing it, and I’m sure you will find it rewarding. I don’t think this post is perfect, but everyone is learning here. I offer some constructive criticism.

    I have a post I put up recently “examples of people living in tinyhouses and how it is working out for them”(or something like that) which is something that anyone who is interested in this might want to look at.

    The problem is that the optimism you express in you post very much appears to be unfounded according to the evidence. For the 90% of us who cannot simply move to one of the few areas that permit tinyhouses, the legal and political barriers are unfortunately not overcome by the suggestions in this post.

    Look I’m sorry if this is harsh, but I don’t think it is fair to other people to give then advice that is unrealistic polyanna, especially asserting things like they are facts. What, for example, evidence do you have that the most important thing is to keep a good attitude? Where has that worked? Because it is in my opinion irresponsible to give out advice like that without any foundation. And who can afford to invest the sort of money we are talking about based on this sort of advice?

    Secondly, arguing about stubborn laws can help you understand them. You should know your enemy, or you are in for a nasty surprise. We should also be thinking about changing the laws, unless you just accept the second-class citizen status the predatory class are so keen to impose on you.

    I suspect that your outlook while writing this post was heavily influenced by the fact you had not seriously actually gone to try and do this. If you had you would understand that when push comes to shove it is not this simple, as explained above and on my blog in several posts.

    I may try to find some examples of people living in RVs in the city and what happens to them up on my blog to try to provide a dose of reality here when I get the chance.

    Reply
    • LLB

      *APPLAUSE*

      Reply
    • Tonita

      Gregor, I have to agree with you on many points that you make, as a tiny home owner myself. So here is a dose of reality. It is not just RV’s in the city but RV’s in very rural country areas as well as my tiny home parked on my acreage where I own another home and mind you, I pay almost FIVE THOUSAND dollars a year in property taxes. Next door is 35 acres with cattle living on the land and I own horse property out in the country in an unincorporated area down a gravel road. Even at that all it takes is ONE complaint. Just ONE phone call to the county for them to follow up and come to your property time and time again just to in force codes and ck up on violations, such as inhabiting your tiny home or 5th wheel _even for ONE night. Yep,, against the law here in King County WA, same county as Seattle. Finding a place to park a tiny house can become a HUGE issue. Some people might consider securing a spot to hide their tiny home before they build it. Hopefully city and county ordinances will change rapidly but in the meantime being a tiny home owner has it’s own set of challenges. One thing you can do to stall such issues is to surround your land if you own it, with Constitutional no trespasser signs. They will have to make assumptions from afar or get a warrant to be on your land.

      Reply
      • Elizabeth

        Thanks for sharing. Great information.

        Reply
  • Jeremy

    When I was first introduced to the tiny house movement I thought it was a god save. I’m disabled and on a fixed income who could never in my wildest dreams afford to live on my own piece of land where I would have to improve it, set up utilities (septic and electricity), build large upon it, be taxed because of it and finance all of it. My family is dying off (I’m the youngest and 58) and will not be here to save me. Therefore, it became obvious that it was a tiny house or die on the streets.

    Some have told me that I could rent an efficiency, but by the time I did that on my income, I would be doing little more than surviving. I really don’t want to survive. I want to live. I want to really live while I still have a little time. Besides, even an efficiency that is affordable would be in an area that I could never feel save in.

    Anyway, Before I took the time to research the laws, codes and options, I took a giant leap and began building my own little house. I sold what little I had which was of any value and maxed out my only credit card. It’s getting near to being finished and looks great. So far I’m very proud of how it is turning out. You can view it at http://www.jeremystinyhouse.com .

    I love it so much but a few people told me that I should sell it to pay off my debt and have the money to build the next one for me. I don’t even have a truck sufficient to haul it yet. But I knew that if I didn’t jump right in and build it, someone or something would talk me out of it. I felt building was the only option that I have to offer any feeling of security in my last years.

    When it’s all said and done… I have no idea where I will go with it. I know I can’t afford the gas to do a national tour of America’s Walmarts. I am trying to just do one thing at a time. I hope there will be somewhere for me to go when the time comes. There’s a lot of unsettled land out there in the wilderness but I think I could never survive total seclusion. I guess I’m waiting for that miracle post or invitation to paradise where people like me can go and live in peace where flowers grow and the sun shines in a world of our own :) (sigh)

    Reply
    • Jody

      Good for you for just doing it! I’ve been really looking into this too. I do have the problem with the land part too though like so many others. I do beleive that this is the way to go. I think it’s great that you are doing what you are doing. You will be debt free and rent free when everyone else is still paying rent and not really ‘living’. I haven’t checked out your link yet, but I will. Thanks for sharing your comment and your home with everyone :)
      Jody

      Reply
    • Jody

      Hey Jeremy, I went to the link but I couldn’t find anything that show’s what you have done. It’s just random links to stuff. :/

      Reply
      • Jeremy

        Sorry about the link. I couldn’t afford to pull out the extra $100 at the time to maintain the domain name. The link is now mytinyhouse.webs.com . Also you can watch my You Tube video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI8iO53xBFM . It has over 2 million views so far..

        Reply
    • deanna

      If you ever get that spectacular invitation – please let me know ’cause I sure as heck would love to watch those flowers grow in the sunshine!

      Reply
  • Mark E Tisdale

    I’m not so sure whether my future lies in a tiny house or just a small apartment down the road, but the future will reveal itself in due time. I nearly bought a small house in a city I’d like to live in a year ago. At around 1,000 square feet, not tiny, but if you took in a room-mate, then it becomes an okay use of space. At any rate, I decided to pass for now (and seeing what housing prices continue to do, I’m not regretting it!).

    I’m hoping Jay’s comment in a recent TV interview about Tiny House communities is a clue to some neat project coming, and hopefully the first of many Tiny House communities. In some places you could slip in through “mobile home park” zoning. That usually raises a grim image in a lot of people’s minds but under the right leadership, it could be much different. Imagine a Co-op situation where everyone had equal ownership in the park? If I’m really dreaming big, imagine a network of them kind of like Thousand Trails and other similar RV passes where you can go from park to park in the network in your RV. But apply it to Tiny Houses. You decide to move to another state, just move into the next Tiny House community in the network. Who knows, could happen!

    For every person who desires to set up their tiny house in the woods, there’s another who doesn’t set their sights there. There’s a part of me that likes the idea of being off on my own, but I also think that our future energy situation, I’d favor being nearer public transit and not driving 50 miles round trip all the time.

    Reply
    • smiley

      hello , i just bought an rv park and 11 rv’s. im trying to spread the word for people that might need a place to park a tiny home. im very new to computers so dont know how to go about it only a little luck thru replying to peoples post. i need advise from anyone as to how i go about spreading the word. jjrachael08@gmail.com

      Reply
    • LLB

      I don’t know, have you seen what mobile home lot rents are like? For that you really aren’t saving any money at all compared to an apartment, considering you have to buy the RV. Something like this would work IF Big For-Profit Business didn’t enter into it, and rents remained LOW and REASONABLE.

      If all housing in the country continues to skyrocket, and homeless people aren’t allowed to build anything to live in and aren’t allowed to be anywhere, what exactly are most of us supposed to do once we get priced out??

      Reply
  • Gene Wallen

    There are a few places you can park your home legally,most of them are in the Ozarks,that`s why Scott Stewart is probably the only tiny home builder that is successful,you could build it to NFPA standard 1192 and park it in a campground, but very few of them will allow you to live there more than six months of the year and they are not cheap. That leaves illegal, you must hide it and that probably means off the grid. The only way to make it happen is to get the building codes and zoning laws changed.

    Reply
  • Gina

    Sense becoming disabled and widowed I have been in a travel trailer and spent time in several great RV parks. Most of them have had tiny houses come through and love them they “make the RV park nicer ” and bring in people who are more “up scale” I have found if you talk to the owner/manager they will work with you on any projects you want to work on (and I have had some strange projects).You can also get some really reasonable monthly rates. Depending on where and who owns it you might get them to let you build a tiny house there if you agree to let them show it to others.
    Its all about talking to the people around where you want to be. Be creative!! and up beat don’t go in expecting them to say no.

    Reply
  • klynn

    I LOVE THE TINY HOUSE MOVEMENT BUT!!!
    Gregor, previously is very on. Have to look @ his blog yet, but living in a College town, traveling fairly in my life, and being in Real Estate brings real life to the picture in America. Even if you find a piece of paradise somewhere in the “plains” area, just for example, even if the Zoning & Codes haven’t been invented yet, you will always want to get to know the people in the area before you are moving to. Most (Sub)urban areas may allow you to build & park your tiny house, but unless you want to always believe your neigbors won’t turn you in, ususally you can’t LIVE in it. Most have to be unoccupied. These codes are there for a reason, they were put there by people who moved there first, mostly to keep housing prices (which affect also tax base and needed amenities paid) up.
    In very rural farm communities, definetly talk to the locals, depending on where you are. They can be suspicious of strangers, and MAY not want what they envision as whole movement of people where they are “to enjoy life” more, when they work from morning to night to eek out a living. Their families have been there for generations, and you will be the “new people” for 20yrs or more! If they choose not to like you, be ready to feel what prejudice is like, they won’t help you, and you may need it in some rural localities, won’t have pleasantries with you at the local little store, etc. They may not mind you, but anything that threatens scares people. Plus while it’s mostly “nice white middle class” (just to put a bigoted description to it) america that is embracing this, THEY are envisioning what may & probably will come, the even more bigoted “white not-so middle class” tiny house people & what they will bring, if they change the codes. EVERYONE I FEEL, deserves to do & live how they want, but unfortunetly most of America is Zoned, etc., & if it isn’t you may start it. Be ready for a fight in most places. It’s unfair I feel this is a great option for homeless problem & others, but American’s like an Idea as long as it’s not in THEIR back yard to bring community or housing prices down (new prison or waste treatment plant for example). If you can find a more progressive attitude in the community, & explain even tiny houses can have their own zoning, codes, and regulations, you may get somewhere. Buyer Beware, or I should say Builder Beware, Real Estate 101. Also you may get further building them & moving it to a permenant foundation (building Size codes beware). Also building on muliti-family (unit) land will usually be much easier, and others could join, finding a piece, that larger complexes, etc. don’t want because it IS a small site.
    Plus I’m gonna put my own plug in for the “Pyramodule” as a permanant dwelling, the roof would be great for off-grid also, with doors reversed out instead of in-set personally.

    Reply
  • Meg

    I took an early retirement. The tiny houses are very intriguing. But I too wonder where I would put one. So, I have decided to live and wander full-time in a small motorhome. While traveling the country I will be scouting for a community I would like to live in…in my tiny house. I won’t be starting this for about a year, but that’s the plan.
    I also could enjoy living in a community of tiny houses, maybe a coop. I’m just staying open to possibilities.

    Reply
  • Alex

    I keep hearing more about the Ozarks.

    Thank you guys for the comments here so far.

    @Gregor I agree with some of your statements. You have your thoughts and I have mine. I like to go about life in an optimistic way because it works for me. You can do as you wish for yours. I’m not advising anyone to do anything here, just giving you ideas.

    Reply
  • Alex

    @Gregor One more thing… not to be harsh either, Gregor… If “I were actually doing this” I would go and buy the trailer, lumber, etc, and start. Knowing that everything else will come together after others see that I am serious about doing it.

    If you are just talking about it, focusing on all of the obstacles you have to go through… How are you ever going to get started? Do you even have the funds/resources to start yet? If not, maybe you need to focus on that first??

    I don’t have the $25,000 to go get a trailer, all the materials, tools, etc to do it all. DO YOU? Otherwise I might. Right now I’m better off paying rent while having enough room to work out of my house. BUT IF I HAD THE $$$, I’d just do it

    Reply
  • Alex

    Jeremy you are a perfect example of what I am talking about… Someone who just started and believes that it will all work out in the end. Kudos to you man. And I KNOW it will work out for you.

    Check out Jeremy’s build on his site…

    http://www.jeremystinyhouse.com/

    Reply
  • Alex

    Mark I think most of the people who come here share that dream of another version of a mobile home park but with beautiful well kept tiny houses instead.

    I think it’s certainly possible it’s just a matter of time before it’s done. I guess it has to make business sense for whoever puts the $$ in. Or make it easy to accomplish as a larger co-op of some kind.

    I believe it’s certainly something that’s coming in the near future.

    Reply
  • Steven

    The simplest way to find a place to park your tiny house is by using the Tiny House Parking section on the Tiny House Listings website.

    http://tinyhouselistings.com/tiny-house-parking/index.php?s=viewmore

    Reply
  • Alex

    So glad you opened that up as option for people, Steven, thanks for coming by and commenting!

    Reply
  • Steven

    My pleasure! People have already began finding places to park their tiny houses and others who have parking available are making some extra cash. Thanks for the plugs!

    Reply
  • Alex

    That’s great! You’re welcome. Talk to you later!

    Reply
  • mike

    How would one move a tiny house trailer into or out of a backyard without big points of access? It seems sad to build something on a trailer bed that can’t go anywhere. :(

    Reply
  • Daniel Elliott

    I’m curious about where people park their TH’s and if there is a movement to establish TH’s villages or communities around the country?
    Twenty five percent of the population move every year, so that’s about 75 million people moving somewhere, (even if it’s across town) in the U.S.
    I think a TH village/community would be feasible where there is a community garden, common room or community center with tools, maybe a pool or school or some sort of educational facility.
    I have a unique parcel of property where and I might be interested in setting up a TH space

    Reply
    • Holly Cunningham

      I am interested in initiating a tiny house co-housing community as you described. I have motivation but no land. Getting one of these up and running will require different skills and contributions from lots of different people- email me at amohca@gmail.com if you’d like to chat!

      Reply
      • deanna carra

        I am looking for a place. Keep me posted. Where are you?

        Reply
  • Wendy

    I haven’t built my tiny house yet, but when I do, I am planning on parking it at my all-time *favorite* place — Alamo River RV resort. It’s a little bit south of San Antonio (Texas). I’ve stayed there in my RV many times, and the people who own it are always very friendly. I am going to park my house down below by the river. Each of their camping spaces has water and an electrical supply (if you stay long-term, you pay your electric bill each month; water was included in the fee for staying there.) And Alamo River RV resort has a place where you can dump your septic tank. When I stayed there last time, I was there for three months. I loved that they let me have my dogs there…

    Here’s a website, if you want to check it out:
    http://www.alamoriver.com/

    I cannot WAIT to get there full time.

    Reply
    • Alice

      Hi, Alex. I’m a disbled senior (?58) with a disabilility; your advice to keep a positive attitude really helped me. Such a process is a scary and multi-faceted adventure, so much harder than merely consulting the real estate ads. Pep talk like yours keep me from trashing this dream as impractical, given my constraints. So, thanks for all you do.
      Alice

      Reply
    • Jeb

      Hi Wendy,
      My name is Jeb and I’m new to this site. I read you post and was wondering if you knew for sure if Alamo River resort accepts tiny homes on their property (and if so, how long will they allow you to stay there). I emailed them yesterday and am waiting on a response. I live in Austin and am looking to have a tiny home built within the next 6 months. Have you had your home built yet?
      Thanks,
      Jeb

      Reply
    • Jeb

      Hi Wendy,
      My name is Jeb and I am new to this site. I read your post and was wondering if you knew for sure if the Alamo River resort accepted tiny homes on their property (and if so, how long will they allow you to stay). I live in Austin and am looking to build a tiny home within the next 6 months. I would definitely move to San Antonio if long term parking were available there. Did you ever get your tiny home built?
      Thanks!
      Jeb

      Reply
  • Barb

    Hi everyone. I am new to the tiny newsletter and blog life, but I’ve been in love with tiny houses since I was a child (53 years ago!). There’s something uniquely quaint about cozy wooden cabins, calming and refreshing escape from the rat race, almost as comforting as being coddled in mama’s arms after you fall off your bicycle with a skinned knee.

    I am a mother of 4 teen/young adults and I have 13 Papillons and a husband of 27 years in a 2100 square foot home in Florida. (Wanna get away???)

    For my midlife crisis resolution, I decided to take my life savings and buy a piece of land on a mountain in North Carolina. I also designed and purchased the materials for a 12x12x12 log cabin to stay under permitting regulations there. I’ve been trying to get back up there since December, but weather and finances have been obstacles.

    I come from a family of do-it-yourself-ers and I’m almost done working on enclosing a 6×10 trailer I bought in January to help bring supplies to the mountain in the clouds. Rather than have it look like a plywood landscape trailer (which it is, basically) I designed it to LOOK like a tiny house, but it will remain a utility trailer. Being my car can only tow 3000 lbs, it is only a single axle and I need to reserve capacity for hauling furnishings & tools so cheap (or free!) and ultra-lightweight are essential. You may view my progress photos here: https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=cfe8a81d15311ac5&page=browse&resid=CFE8A81D15311AC5!191&parid=CFE8A81D15311AC5!103&authkey=!ApCzhmFWL43zy7g&Bpub=SDX.SkyDrive&Bsrc=Share&sc=Photos&type=5

    As for the land I found, it started with the concept of returning to a more simplified life, a homestead, as it were. Someplace where one can unwind, roll up your sleeves & get back to nature. I come from a large family (not only the one I created with my husband, but also my roots) and we’ve all dreamed about ‘some day’ having a large piece of land and all living in our own cabins. Well, with my parents in their 80′s, my siblings scattered across the USA with lives/families of their own, I don’t see the family dream coming to fruition as such…enter my mid-life crisis mountain cabin solution…..After I get the first 12×12 built, I plan on building an outhouse, a workshop, a garden/greenhouse, a spring house (we found a natural spring!). Ultimately, I’d like to grow it into a homestead where tiny housers could come & rent & work with me. Just a dream at this point, but hey, last summer, I had no land, no trailer, no building materials, so ALOT can happen in a couple of seasons if you put your mind to it!

    As for building codes, the land I have is unincorporated (outside city limits) and therefore if a building is under 12′ in any direction, it is outside of permit requirements. Also, the only restriction I know of is no mobile homes. But with our own spring water, and a few solar panels & batteries, and a gazebo by the creek, or an outdoor kitchen pavilion, who needs restrictions???

    Anyway, I’ve been much encouraged by your discussions and I hope that if I can get my slope of mountain tamed enough, I can invite tiny house dwellers to come visit/stay off-grid a while! (At least until the Rapture!)

    Just puttin’ it out there…any ideas?

    Reply
    • Jeb

      Barb,
      I love your dream! It inspires me to dream as well!
      I currently live in Austin TX and am looking to have my tiny home built within the next 6 months (the good Lord willing : )
      I lived in NC for 5 years in the mid 90′s near the coast and it sure was beautiful. I’m a chicken when it comes to the cold weather so in my mind, you are very brave to rough it in those NC mountains!
      Many wishes that your dreams come true : )
      Jeb

      Reply
      • Barb D

        Aww, shucks, thanks, Jeb. Once I get it up & running, everyone’s invited.
        I arrived in NC in mid-June 2013 and despite the rainiest July on record, I’ve made some great progress. I built all the walls & flooring foundation at my brother’s house on the same road as my cabin site. We had a friend carry the walls down the road on his tractor & trailer. Then he used his tractor to push the walls up into vertical & we secured them into place. That was back on Aug 16th.
        It is really coming along. Yesterday, Sept 11, we finished the roof! All tin panels installed & now we’re concentrating on finishing installing the windows/doors I’d collected from Habitat for Humanity’s Re-Store and then we’re on to mounting the log siding. After it’s all enclosed, I’m heading back to Florida to catch up on reality. Then I’ll come back up in a month or so to do some interior work like wiring, insulation & wall paneling.

        For some REALLY great photos and tutorial videos of the entire progress, you can go here: http://sdrv.ms/14ItE2h
        I will also pretty-up the photo collection and post it all in order with comments at my blog site: http://www.in-the-clouds.net

        Thanks for dreaming with me!
        ~~Barb

        Reply
        • Alex

          Hey Barb, cool project. Thanks a bunch of sharing. Congrats on getting roof done yesterday too! Looking really good. Keep us updated. I’m in FL too. Wouldn’t mind getting some land in NC for a tiny house either. Dreamy set up! :D

          Reply
          • Bab

            Hey Alex,
            THANKS for the congrats! Coming from you, that means something to me! I’ve been meaning to enter my progress photo link on tinyhousetalk.com for others to follow, want to re-post my 2 descriptions above to another thread rather than the “where to park” category? I don’t know how to do it, but I’d sure like some comments from your readers as to how I’m doing or what improvements they may suggest.

            My ‘real’ residence is in Boynton Beach, with 4 grown children, 13 papillon dogs, 3 puppy papillons & my husband of 27 years. Where are you in Fla?

            Feel free to contact me via email if it gets ‘too personal’ to post here.

            Looking forward to ‘talking’ with you more.

            ~~Barb

          • Alex

            Sure I’d love to repost some of your progress/descriptions. Maybe in a new post.

            Boynton Beach, that’s great. I’m not far on the other coast in Naples FL.

    • Holly

      Fantastic idea, and I believe that the groundwork is already in place for you to do it! There is a network of homesteads/organic farms that create a chain of locations across the country for people to come and work in exchange for room and board. It’s called WWOOFing (World Wide Organization of Organic Farmers, visit http://www.wwoofusa.org/), and it’s already well established. I’m about to embark on my first wwoofing experience in the summer, because I too am very interested in homesteading. In fact, my ideal situation is exactly what you’re proposing- the wwoofing system of trading labor for room and board, but instead being put up in their home/barn/campsite, I’d love to find a place to park my tiny house for the 2-6 months I apprentice there! Then, together, we create a beautiful homestead!

      Please connect with me at amohca@gmail.com if you’d like to chat. I’d love to help you see your dream to fruition!
      Holly

      Reply
      • Alex

        Thanks Holly

        Reply
    • Dawn

      Barb,

      How is the build going? I am interested in simplifying my life so that I can focus on things that matter like my son, family and friends. I am not in a position to buy or build anything. I am interested in starting my simplification process by paring down my material possessions. Do you have any other ideas? God Bless!

      Dawn

      Reply
  • Jerilyn Atkinson

    Good evening I have purchased several of the books on building my Tiny house whether its on wheels or land doesn’t really matter to me. But everybody I talk to here in Indiana think I’m crazy the bank won’t loan me less than $40000 for a house , the realtor keeps finding mee some good some choices but it’s to low for a loan. I really want to be debt free so if I can find a house 600ft for little less than $20000 why would I want to go more. I’m alone and can’t do stairs but wouldn’t mind a loft for visitors (grandsons). I live in apartments but it’s getting worse for elderly and health issues when it gets raided @7:30pm. Any advice on how to get free stuff or land just a couple acres I’d be happy I have a job and want to get everything pd before I retire. Thanks for any help

    Reply
  • Blondell Lehocki

    I am purchasing land in New Mexico and I am very willing to share it. You will need an incinerating toilet as composting is not an option. Here is the link http://incinolet.com/. You will need to create a grey water system. They are very easy. You will need solar. http://www.altestore.com/store/Packaged-Systems/c447/?campaign=SolarPanels&gclid=COTpscKAuroCFc-Y4AodnBsA7A. There will be a community Garden involved. It is better to live in a small group rather than alone. You never know when you may need help. The idea is to look out for each other and still have your own space. Will be very happy to chat with you about the possibilities here. Have been told lots are about 17 to 18 miles from town. Will be going to Taos New Mexico area to look at the lots.

    Reply
    • Alex Pino

      Thanks!

      Reply
    • Rudy

      Blondell, I’ll keep you in mind. I did some researching some years ago on weather patterns. Where you’re going, is ideal temperature for summer. I was looking at Questa. When it’s hot as the dickens all around in the Southwest, it’s always cooler in Questa, New Mexico. It’s the valley it’s in. This valley which extends up into Colorado is somehow protected from the heat. I mean summer after summer. I watched it on The Weather Channel for 8 years straight. ” It’s Always Cool in Questa.” I’m thinking about a tiny house, but I’d need permanent land to rent on; unless I bought my own land. And I don’t want the landowner deciding to up and sell one day or croaking on me. I ain’t stupid. I’ll think about it. A tiny house is a great idea when you’re single and alone. Bye for now. Rudy

      Reply
    • Kathy

      Have you found property?

      Reply
  • Barbara

    I am currently gathering information/ideas for owning a tiny home. I will want my tiny home located in central Florida somewhere near/around the west coast. Do you know of a place in/near this area where I can place my tiny home. I’ve thought of purchasing a small lot, say <.25 acres or finding a place that is not too expensive to rent. Any help/ideas would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
  • Maria

    Buying a piece of land is expensive. You have to pay property taxes on it every year.. You have to have money to put in water,electric and a septic tank. You need to have insurance on your tiny home. living in a rv park is expensive too. you really have to weigh things out before you build or buy a tiny house.

    Reply
    • Tonita

      Maria,
      Your point is well taken. There are always costs involved. If you own your own land like I do you still may not be able to live in your tiny house on your land. Bringing in utilities to undeveloped land is also costly but can vary hugely in different parts of the country. Then there is the option of just buying and already built very small stick built home in a state with low property taxes. No headaches trying to find legal parking, no rent to pay for parking and just a small mortgage if that. By the time someone builds a decent tiny house they seem to be spending in the ballpark of $20-30K for it. For about 50K ish give or take, you can find lots of little homes across America, near or in town and in rural areas for sale where you can own your own home and the land. Land /property taxes would potentially cost you less than renting a spot for a mobile tiny house. Lots of advantages to this like not having to move if your landlord sells the property you are parked on, no need to worry about a neighbor complaining. Work towards paying your mortgage off quickly and sleep in peace at night.

      Reply
  • Ryan

    I know posting here is a long shot, but I’m trying everything to find a place at least for building my tiny house around Rochester NY (though I’ll eventually need a place to park it for living, too). Living in an apartment currently so I don’t have the land to set the trailer on.

    If anyone out there has some land that could work, give me a shout via my craigslist posting about this: http://rochester.craigslist.org/wan/4434886363.html

    Reply
    • Judie

      Ryan,

      I sure hope that you find something! Let me know if you do – I need some home that this can be done in NY! I’d love to find a spot myself.

      Reply
  • JC

    I dont own a home but I rent ( everyone I know with a house are up to their eyeballs with debt and are basically mortgage poor) I’m totally in love with the tiny homes and the ultra low maintenance on one. I’m planning on buying/building one in the near future – I hope!
    The biggest obstacle is – no doubt – where to put one and I think that’s the reason I see so many tiny homes for sale. I’m 51 and doing everything possible to retire early. So far RV parks are the only places I can fine that will accept one of these homes (on wheels classified RV’s)…these RV parks have monthly leases and some are outrageous (here in South Florida a whopping $700 a month average but you have access to all the RV parks perks such as a pool, community house, full laundry facilities, etc)
    I read here people wanting to live in remote areas, its a wonderful dream, but as you get older you need to be near doctors, hospitals and the like – this is something you have to seriously consider and A LOT of people dont add that to their equation.

    Reply
  • Charlie

    Would and 1 acre or 1 1/2 acre plot of land big enought for a 12×24 tiny house
    Thanks charlie

    Reply
  • bstein

    First you have to build a tiny home on a trailer to get around home size laws. Then for the most part it sounds like you can’t even live in it on your own land in most places.

    And one commenter was offering space for $350 a month.

    No seeing the appeal anymore. It sounds near impossible to find a place to park it.

    If you ask me maybe the movement can change to a tree house movement.

    Reply
  • Stacy B

    Thanks everyone for your thoughts!
    Does anyone have land between Gaviota and Ventura California? This is where I’d like to put my tiny house, but I’m not getting a tiny house until I hae secured a space for it. This is a new concept for most people and it’s frustrating as hell because it’s such a simple easy way to live and I’m surprised more people haven’t jumped on board but I have faith it will happen! If you have land available, Please keep posting it thanks!!

    Reply
  • Kathy

    I. have recently been introduced to the Tiny Home movement due to an article I read in the newspaper here in Toronto. Since then I have been steadily looking at photos and articles to gather more information for howI can manage going this route.

    From what I have read its almost like you are an outlaw and may have to pick up an leave in the middle of the night as municipalities, townships, city’s and states do not allow ‘off the grid’ housing.

    I am fully aware that this would. not be an option for Toronto and never permitted and actually my goal would be to have a retirement property i. a hot climate, i.e. Florida, CA, etc and also safety would be of issue. I understand Florida does not allow off grid housing. I am looking to purchase the land and looking not to be in a trailer park situation, sandwiched between others. A beautiful setting is a must. I am open to anything safe, beautiful and though a tiny home would work, also interested in small with hydro hook up and hooked to well/sewage. I realize this is a more expensive route to go.

    It would be gratefully appreciated any advice that can be given by those who have gone this route? I will need to find someone to build a home that would be affordable and usable. Camping cabin is not what I can realistically live in for 5 or 6 months of the year.

    I loved this home and would be thrilled to have a tiny home like this one(though cant figure out how you save these homes from hurricanes)!!
    http://tinyhouseswoon.com/st-george-island-tiny-house/#more-7927

    this type is wonderful as well

    http://www.idesignarch.com/rustic-modern-tiny-house-for-tall-people/

    any advice or referrals for how to buy land, build a tiny home, maybe on grid to make life a whole lot easier with the ‘law’ would be so helpful.

    Reply

Leave a Comment