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Breakthrough legislation allows CA homeowners to build up to two ADU’s (Tiny Homes) on their property


Just got news that Governor Newsom signed historic housing legislation for California that allows homeowners to build up to two ADU’s (accessory dwelling units) on their property.

This legislation will definitely boost interest and demand for micro, tiny, and small homes in California – where extra housing just like this is desperately needed. What do you think? This is a good thing, right? I suppose, some homeowners will be upset about it.

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California allowing homeowners to build up to two tiny homes on their property…

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Photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

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Photo by Andrea Davis from Pexels

Please read the full article here and discuss in the comments below. Would love to read your thoughts and opinions on this.

Learn more

California YIMBY | Reason.com Article on the Matter

Our big thanks to Peter Stephensen for the tip!🙏

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
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{ 4 comments… add one }
  • October 10, 2019, 3:52 pm

    FINALLY, a tool to utilize inner-city wasted spaces. A possible aid to homelessness and low-income housing. So many chances for some enterprising towns to grab the concept of in-town housing shops staffed by the young and experienced workers seeking to learn new and lasting trades. With the soon to be the availability of Hemp Oak wood replacement and the variety of building materials that can be grown ANYWHERE we could see a creative boon in styles as well as function. You live in interesting times and I envy your youth because of what you might see in housing.

  • Avatar Elizabeth Rubio
    October 10, 2019, 5:08 pm

    It’s a wonderful thing! I agree 100% with Mr. Burgess. I spent my childhood (1940’s/50’s) in tiny spaces and spent a good deal of spare time designing them for fun, Small houses were more normal then, but today’s tiny house movement came too late for me, too. Minneapolis has been allowing backyard ADUs for a while. Out of necessity, the trend, we can hope, will continue in other states and cities.

  • Avatar Melissa Robinson
    October 10, 2019, 5:09 pm

    My only comment is – it’s about time!! California has a significant homeless population who are forced to live in tents on city sidewalks. Obviously something had to be done to rectify this situation. This homeless population isn’t just single adults but families with children. It should have never gotten this bad in the first place- something should have been done years ago but at least the Governor stepped up and is doing something about it now!

  • Avatar Eric
    October 18, 2019, 5:09 pm

    We need more of this in New Zealand too. Currently we have city/town councils around the country fighting rearguard actions to stop tiny houses etc. Because… money! Well lack of it to be precise. Resource consents etc. generate enormous amounts of revenue for them. Classic case is one council trying to determine that a house on wheels is a permanent building despite it being registered and warranted as a mobile trailer.

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