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dancing rabbit ziggy tire roof

A few years ago, Alex did a piece on some land for sale near Dancing Rabbit Eco Village. Let’s return to Missouri to check out some the most recent projects of this thriving intentional community.

Brian Liloia goes by Ziggy and has been living at Dancing Rabbit Eco Village for nearly four years.

He started his busy blog, The Year of Mud, soon after.

Ziggy has given the tiny house and natural building community a huge resource by continuing to document his construction projects through his blog.

Today, hundreds of blog posts take readers step by step through his building process.

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afloat-with-thiel-2

Phil Thiel of Seattle, Washington, has inspired a whole fleet of tiny human powered houseboats in the United States, England and Germany.

He calls his quaint canal cruisers Escargots for their slow speed and sells the building plans for just $150.

Each 18.5′ by 6′ houseboat fits up to three bunks and is propelled by a combination of pedal and solar power.

The solar drive isn’t strong enough to allow for direct solar power propulsion and the best way to move about is to pedal.

At a pedaling rate of 50 rotations per minute, Thiel’s design can puff along at four miles an hour.

Keep in mind that the average cyclist pedals at around 60 rotations per minutes and professionals can do nearly twice that!

A cute and cozy Escargot canal cruiser

Thiel, now 91 years old, is a naval architect who started enthusing about and building human-powered boats when he was a teenager. Born in Brooklyn and now relocated to Seattle, Thiel has only driven an automobile twice in his life. Houseboats, though, he’s steered plenty of times.

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Jay Shafer of Tumbleweed Tiny Houses

Jay Shafer felt overwhelmed by the 4,000 square foot home he grew up in back in Iowa.

Time, energy and resources were spent maintaining space that added very little to their lives on the whole.

This distaste for wasted space emerged as a creative influence when Shafer was in his 20s.

After college, he started making blueprints of tiny homes just for fun.

Exploring how space is used, brainstorming how to use it more efficiently and learning about the materialism of our culture, he decided to pursue the passion further.

One of the legal difficulties he found right away was zoning laws that restrict how big anyone living establishment must be.

In most states, to be considered a house a building has to measure at least 220 square feet.

Jay Shafer of Tumbleweed Tiny Houses

Photo Courtesy of Tumbleweed Houses

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