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Vintage Grace New Park Model For Sale, Texas

This is new park model for sale at the Vintage Grace Tiny Home Community in Yantis, TX.


There are multiple “pad sites” available where you can put this beautiful new home (check them out here!) and join the community in Yantis, minutes from Lake Fork, one of Texas’s Largest Lakes known for its Large Mouth Bass Fishing Competitions. Learn more about living at Vintage Grace on their website.

Details about the park model (including price) on the last page, along with contact information for Vintage Grace and a video tour!

Related: Ruth’s 399 Sq. Ft. Park Model Tiny House For Sale, NC

Vintage Grace New Park Model For Sale, Texas

Enter via the living room — Just add your comfiest couch!


Lots of windows and great eating nook by the kitchen.

Kitchen includes full-size appliances for all your cooking needs.

Looks like plenty of cabinet space.

Living room area with nice side windows.

Yay! I love having a dishwasher.

See more of this new park model on the next page!

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.

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{ 22 comments… add one }
  • Karin W Ballard May 21, 2017, 2:05 pm

    Sorry but I didn’t find the price anywhere. Can you please let me know.
    Txs

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 22, 2017, 3:29 pm

      Hi Karin! My bad I completely left it out. $59,900.

  • Bill Burgess May 21, 2017, 6:44 pm

    I am thinking they are using Diamond Industries Park Model line? Brad ‘s team does the BEST work anywhere west of the Rockies and just a short drive to Alba from this location?
    I have several designs in process that work well at this location.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 22, 2017, 3:26 pm

      I’m not sure, Bill! It does look pretty great, though.

  • Steve of TinyQualityHomes.org May 21, 2017, 8:47 pm

    This is a pretty large THOW.

    • James D. May 21, 2017, 10:00 pm

      It’s a Park Model RV, they typically hover around 398 to 400 square feet…

  • Bj May 22, 2017, 12:07 am

    I am not sure why this is in the tiny house letter. It’s bigger than my first house. It’s more like a mobile home. Only bigger.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 22, 2017, 3:25 pm

      Hi BJ — We post small homes as well on Tiny House Talk 🙂 But this is 399 sq. ft., which is just under our 400 sq. ft. limit for “tiny,” so we would include it either way!

    • James D. May 22, 2017, 5:26 pm

      Tiny is relative… People just call tiny whatever is really smaller than what they’re used to.

      It doesn’t matter that what we now call tiny used to be normal but as the average household size has ballooned to over 2600 sq ft that anything that’s less than a fifth of that is considered Tiny, or 500 sq ft or less… with small being 600-800 sq ft, though some consider small goes all the way up to 1200 sq ft, which can be one of the biggest sizes you can tow on the road with a oversize sticker and special moving permit without having to necessarily chop the house up into seconds for the move…

      A bit of trivia, the cabin Abraham Lincoln grew up in was 16×18 or only 288 sq ft…

      While Park Model RV’s can legally go up to 500 sq ft, they just stick to around 398-400 sq ft because if they go over 400 sq ft then they have to switch from RV building code to HUD building code, which is the same as residential Modular/Manufactured houses… Though, they don’t count exterior spaces like the deck/patios, just the interior space and if the loft has 5 feet or higher head space then it’s counted too but it’s usually less and thus that’s usually bonus space too…

      Inversely, when it comes to THOWs not everyone abides by the official standards of measurement… So many Tiny Houses sq ft measurements include the loft regardless of whether they have 5 feet or more of headroom to make the smaller ones seem like they’re bigger…

      However, there have been a few that have pushed the limits of THOW design and gone up to around 450-480 sq ft…

      While others have combined two or more units to form a larger combined house when parked… So there’s some flexibility in what’s considered Tiny as well…

  • Carol Perry May 22, 2017, 8:29 am

    This tiny home is just gorgeous! I love the size of this tiny house! Which does not seem to Tiny! It has a faboulous kitchen! All the rooms in the home are a good size! Even the porch is large! This tiny home is a keeper! 🌺🌻🌺

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 22, 2017, 3:25 pm

      Yes at 399 sq. ft. it’s almost out of the “tiny” range but they fit a whole lot into it!

  • Emily c. May 22, 2017, 4:20 pm

    Love Park size homes. This one is very nice. Pictures where fine but I didn’t care for the video. I’d rather the video be more true to size of house, and not with distorted views. I’d also like to know if door on side of hallway is storage and can the dead space on small wall in loft be converted into storage cabinet. If I move into a small house I need storage so if I were to purchase a park size I would want stair storage as well. I do like the way the loft is split. I could use each side for a different purpose.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 23, 2017, 1:26 pm

      Storage stairs are a great way to use space in a tiny house, for sure!

  • Michael May 23, 2017, 12:40 am

    I like it but don’t need the loft. 4’10″is definitely not for a 6’4″tall guy.
    Putting it off allows to reduce interior height about 5′ to 6′ which still provides sufficient ceiling height. The space of stairs can be used to accommodate laundry and a working desk.
    Beside that it reduces building costs because dormers are labor intensive and less material is needed.
    I would keep the upper windows for ventilation.
    The price tag is in similar to the 8′ THOW’s but you get more for it.
    Well done.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 23, 2017, 1:14 pm

      All clever ideas that would make it a great home 🙂

    • James D. May 24, 2017, 2:04 am

      You may be getting a little more space compared to the average but you’re not really getting more for the price…

      Park Model RV’s are still RV’s… They’re not usually built to the quality of a residential house, it’s why they usually stick to 398-400 sq ft instead of going to the max of 500 sq ft as they are legally required to switch to HUD building code if they go over 400 sq ft, and are not intended to be lived in full time/year-round… Along with being factory made and thus come in standard model designs that are usually sold as is and most do not offer the complete range of customization that THOWs can offer…

      Besides, you can still get a THOW this size or even larger, as THOW builders aren’t limited by trying to avoid HUD building code like RV makers… The 8′ 6″ wide is just the road legal limitations but you can make a THOW 10′-12′ wide as well as long as you don’t intend to move it very often.

      While there are builders who will go even bigger with custom trailers or skip the regular limitations all together and make a modular/manufactured style home that can be placed on a permanent or temporary foundation and like a container home can still be moved…

      Not that it’s impossible to find a Park Model RV builder who will do custom work… Some have even migrated over to doing THOWs, but it’s generally easier to just find a THOW builder that’ll do it and give you more control over the budget…

      • Cynthia O. May 24, 2017, 6:25 am

        Good points in your post. I’m interested in finding a builder who could craft a modular/manufactured style home for placement on a permanent foundation. This would be for year round living.
        Any particular builders or designers you would recommend?

        • James D. May 24, 2017, 10:15 pm

          Cynthia O, which state and what kind of house do you want?

          This is just a primer of what options you can have but you could either go with a national recognized company like Clayton Homes… They have two tiny house models they’re selling presently…

          Companies like Wheelhaus have a couple of Tiny House models to choose from and there are many others…

          Or a local builder… In Florida, for example, Cornerstone Tiny Homes offers Tiny Homes on foundations in addition to THOWs…

          If you prefer local, many custom house builders will make just about anything you want within the legal limits of your area…

          In parts of Idaho, for example, there’s generally only a requirement that a manufactured house be larger than 150 sq ft and show that it meets HUD building code.

          While some counties in South Carolina may only require that the house be on at least 2 acres of land and at least 50 feet away from any public road… But can be any size house you want…

          So where will determine what options you have for a permanent placement… Along with just how custom you may want your house and what total budget you will be working with.

        • Cynthia O May 25, 2017, 7:16 am

          James D. Thanks for your reply; I’m currently in California, but will be looking at moving to Massachusetts, not far from Amherst. One of my daughters lives there — and grandchildren, too.
          I’ve been a California resident my whole life, but recognize it is getting quickly priced into the Stratosphere.
          I’m retired and single, so going smaller makes sense.
          I appreciate there are folk out there who need a ‘bigger – tiny’: A lot can be included efficiently into a 1,000 sq. ft. home if the design is well considered. You make an excellent point about building to meet local codes and for long-term residency. Weather considerations are a major concern. By definition, a THOW or tiny home built elsewhere and placed on a foundation might not have the durability or insulating qualities a small home built to local codes would have. Thank you for mentioning local builders, since they are going to be most familiar with codes wherever I finally ‘land’.
          This thread has made me realize there is MUCH more to planning and building than I realized.

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 25, 2017, 2:08 pm

          Hi Cynthia! It’ll be a while yet before I buy land and purchase a home, but I was in touch with Homebuilt because they are a MA company building smaller/tiny homes. Might be worth getting in touch with them 🙂 It looks like they are making some changes, but hopefully good ones: http://www.homebuiltcompany.com/

      • Michael May 24, 2017, 7:33 am

        James, I understand the coding but looking on the price tag of THOW they are often much higher for a smaller footprint already which is going to increase when more sqft added.

  • James D. May 24, 2017, 8:20 am

    Not always, besides you seem to be ignoring the value for the sq ft…

    A THOW can be completely customized in every conceivable way… A Park Model RV can’t!

    Saving money on things like eliminating the loft and going with a lower roof with a simpler roof design are options you can have with a THOW… Along with optimizing the floor plan and furniture to make the most use of the space.

    These are not things Park Model RV’s are known for…

    While a better built house will of course last longer, require less maintenance and cost less to live in the long run… There’s a significant difference between meeting HUD building code and RV building code…

    The RV build code is mainly concerned with safety but not livability or longevity of the structure since they are intended by design to be temporary dwellings…

    Sure, if you plan on only using this for a few years then it can be cheaper and worth it but if you want an actual home that will last and not end up costing you more in the end then it’s not the best choice…

    It can also cost more if you plan on living in an region with much less than ideal weather and need to pay more to heat or cool the space because it lacks sufficient insulation.

    In my opinion, it’s not really worth the up front price difference… You are free to disagree but just be aware of the trade offs involved for why there is a price difference…

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