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Utopian Villa’s 28′ Dragonfly THOW — SOLD!

This is the Utopian Villa’s 28′ Dragonfly THOW in Oak Creek, WI that’s for sale sold! The price has been reduced to $55,000.


Utopian Villas purchased the plans to build their version of the Robinson’s Dragonfly. The beautiful, modern build has a nifty “hidden staircase,” a retractable extra countertop and a myriad of top-of-the-line features including keyless entry and USB power ports. It has a loft bedroom, fun roof line with a skylight and a very comfy-looking couch!

Get additional details below the pictures, and contact the seller via the contact form!

Related: Deek Tours the 20′ Dragonfly Tiny House on Wheels

Utopian Villa’s 28′ Dragonfly THOW

Images via Utopian Villas

Related: Upper Valley Tiny Homes Beach House THOW


Images via Utopian Villas

Related: Treehouse Lounge THOW in Austin, Texas

Highlights:

  • 28’x10’; 220 Sq. Ft. Sleeping up to 4, kitchen, full bathroom amenities, heating & AC
  • Builder & Unit Certifications
  • Utopian Villas (Oak Creek, WI)
  • RC (International Residential Code), RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry Association), NADA (National Auto Dealer Association), EDU (Equivalent Dwelling Unit)
  • Rough Construction
  • Custom Built Trailer w/ 4 stabilizer jacks & front jacks
  • Lindsey Floor System w/ 1/2” Green Treat Ply Underbelly
  • Floor Insulation Closed Cell Verse Foam R-28
  • Exterior 2×4 walls/ZIP sheeting
  • Exterior Insulation/BATT R-21
  • Interior Walls Frame 2×4 Premium Grade
  • Roof/2X8/Zip/R-48
  • 2 Deck Mounted Skylights
  • 2×4 Interior Wall w/ Loft Framing
  • 5” Reveal Cedar Lap Siding w/ Clear Coat
  • Exterior Aluminum Soffit & Fascia
  • Galvanized Corrugated Siding
  • Roofing 60mil EPDM Rubber Roof
  • Vinyl Windows w/Low-e Argon STD Colors
  • Upgraded Keyless Entry Pad
  • Fiberglass French Patio Doors w/ keyed locks
  • Cedar Canopy’s w/ Clear Coat
  • Window Install, Zip system
  • 2 Fold Down Exterior Porches
  • Exterior Light per entry door
  • Front mounted propane housing(cabinet)
  • Décor outlets & switches w/ white cover plates
  • TV/DVD Combo
  • LED recessed lights
  • USB/outlet combos
  • Weatherproof outlet w/ GFI protections per entry door
  • Plumbing/Drain/Water
  • Water Softener
  • Water Storage/Grey/Black Tanks
  • Instant hot water heater
  • Std Fijitsu AC/Heat/Heat Pump
  • 50-AMP 25’ Cord
  • Hardwired smoke detectors & CO 2 w/ battery backup
  • Bath Vent Light
  • Built in 2 Burner cook-top
  • Pine car siding on walls & ceiling w/ clear coat
  • Schlage door lock
  • Base/Trim/Wood/2.5” Pine
  • Flooring/Plank Vinyl – wood grain aesthetic
  • Single bowl stainless sink w/ single lever faucet in Kitchen
  • Mirror
  • Corner sink w/ single handle faucet
  • Shower/Fiberglass w/ faucet
  • Toilet/Elongated/T.P. Holder
  • Cabinets/Maple/Built-In w/ Hardware
  • Under cabinet refrigerator
  • Maple ladder w/ loft stairs
  • Maple dining sliding table
  • Counters/Laminate
  • Curtain Rod Install
  • TV & Wall mount
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Setting/Trucking/Finish
  • $55,000

Sold!

Resources: 

Related: Completed Robinson Dragonfly Tiny House on Wheels

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.




{ 36 comments… add one }
  • Kathy Cawley January 26, 2017, 4:12 pm

    I love these stairs! You can simply slide them out of sight to have room. Will they slide easily if you’re in the loft and someone puts them away and forgets to pull them back out?

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 27, 2017, 7:36 am

      Ooh good question! I would definitely ask the builder that.

      • Rick C February 22, 2017, 11:12 am

        I saw a video a while back from a show, and they had a walkthrough of a Dragonfly. It certainly looked like (although they didn’t do it in the video) you’d be able to slide it back from either side–look again at the pictures, and notice where the handholds are, and that the picture with the ladder fully open still has a bit of finger space, probably due to cabinet handles.

  • Gordon January 26, 2017, 4:32 pm

    Isn’t that the DragonFly 28 THOW?

    • Rick C February 22, 2017, 11:16 am

      “Utopian Villas purchased the plans to build their version of the Robinson’s Dragonfly. ”

      Looks like the pictures are the same ones we’ve seen before, of Robinson’s version. You can see pictures of an actual Utopian model at http://www.utopian-villas.com/dragonfly-2/. (Utopian’s website says they’re selling the Dragonfly starting at $49K, not $69K–probably the one for sale has upgrades.)

  • ZACHARY E MOHRMANN January 26, 2017, 7:38 pm

    I love the house and I will admit that it has a lot of time and craftsmanship involved in it’s design, and construction… I still however believe that no tiny house should be priced as high as this one , and that it contradicts what the tiny house movement is all about…! And if we continue to advocate these exuberant charges by making perches’s of these tiny houses at these prices, we are setting up a wonderful opportunity we have in this point in time to make housing available to many who can not otherwise be able to afford a houses of their own… Also I am sorry to have to say these things and I have nothing against this builder, but if I don’t say anything who will, it has to start with someone….!

    • oxide February 22, 2017, 10:50 am

      I see where Zach is coming from. It seems as if the houses fall into two categories:

      (1) Commercially produced houses at $65K+ (more $$$ for frillies like beds that raise and lower)
      (2) $15-20K handmade one-0ffs and unfinished shells.

      What we need is something in the middle, for example a mass-produced $35-$40K no-frills economy model. I remember *one* shipping container house that was able to come in under $40K. It was empty and forlorn, but it had running water and basic appliances. Maybe one of those commercial companies can expand on that idea.

  • Danielle DiLisio January 26, 2017, 8:11 pm

    Very creative with the ladder, it’s nice to be able to hide it. Very nice house

  • Dick January 26, 2017, 10:14 pm

    Yes it is; it’s the Dragonfly 28. The plan, from Robinson Plans, can be viewedd here: http://robinsonplans.com/home-plans/contemporary-dragonfly-28/

  • Nanny M January 26, 2017, 11:30 pm

    Zachary
    “…no tiny house should be priced as high as this one , and that it contradicts what the tiny house movement is all about…! And if we continue to advocate these exuberant charges by making perches’s of these tiny houses at these prices, we are setting up a wonderful opportunity we have in this point in time to make housing available to many who can not otherwise be able to afford a houses of their own…”
    No need for all this worry. People say this a lot. But there is room in “the tiny house movement” for people to pick and choose what fits their budget and needs. No harm in showing what else an be done.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 27, 2017, 7:18 am

      I do think it’s dangerous to put a cap on how much a tiny house can be worth. At one point I compared it to saying that no one should be allowed to buy Kellogg’s cereal because the off brand is cheaper and more accessible to the masses. Affordable tiny homes are WONDERFUL and of course, I LOVE them, but this might be affordable to someone out there, even though I’d never buy Kellogg’s personally 🙂

      • Silver Gypsy January 27, 2017, 7:19 pm

        It’s not about putting a hard “cap” on the prices of housing, it is about notifying builders what many of us feel about the pricing; that if builders target the THOW market, expect that many of us are not going to be looking for or buying high-end price points; that not only does it conflict with our notions of what the THOW Movement is all about, but in a very practical way, many of these builders have priced themselves straight out of our price range so don’t expect us as customers. And to say that we are attempting to dictate to the builders is rather ludicrous. Since when do average or limited income people dictating anything to corporations, especially these days??? No, we are just informing THOW builders of our parameters and buying power. Also, I think it is rather melodramatic to say that indicating a median price point for many of us would-be-buyers is “dangerous”. Let’s keep it real.

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee January 30, 2017, 7:43 am

          Oh I certainly think we should tell builders that they are pricing themselves out of our market. No complaint about that. Same way we’ve been saying we don’t like lofts and builders have started (slowly) delivering. However, many people say things like “they shouldn’t be allowed to…” sell homes for this much. That’s all I’m arguing against.

      • Silver Gypsy January 30, 2017, 9:21 am

        I can’t argue with you there, Natalie. There is no such thing as “shouldn’t be allowed to” sell their THOW at whatever price they want to ask for. All we are saying is, if it gets too pricey, don’t expect a stampede.

        • Rick C February 22, 2017, 11:22 am

          I think it’s useful to not simply think of people wanting to live in THOWs as a monolithic movement.

          The people who build them themselves in their backyards on their own time, sure. But commercial builders making houses that approach six figures? They’re “just” people building niche-market housing. Nothing wrong with that, but they probably don’t have the same motivation.

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee February 23, 2017, 6:41 am

          I also think it’s useful to see tiny house builders, for the most part, as small business owners. These are typically small mom-and-pop operations, usually with one head guy who started the whole thing. There are, of course, bigger companies, but the majority of stuff we post is from folks just trying to make a living like the rest of us 🙂

    • Michael L February 9, 2017, 10:22 am

      I get so tired of hearing people tell us what the “Movement” is!

      There are homes featured here that fall into all price ranges… from those from recycled materials and only a few thousand dollars to high end. What is “affordable” to one person may not be to someone else. Not everyone is looking for the $5000 version that was assembled in a backyard! Nothing wrong with that concept… but certainly NOT what everyone is looking for. If it was… there wouldn’t be the higher end versions available!

      As for builders pricing themselves out of the market… Price won’t be the only determining factor of who is left in the market down the road!

  • Bruce CG Gallagher January 27, 2017, 2:03 am

    At first seeing this design I thought I was hallucinating. There are so many “steals” from the Dragonfly design; unique staircase, fold up decks, opposite facing doors, pull out table, the exterior. This inclusion of the Hillside item on your site Alex is just creepy. It is blatant plagiarism and artistic theft. Below you can see the creator from Regina, Saskatchewan. http://robinsonplans.com/home-plans/contemporary-dragonfly-28/….I also believe the Dragonfly plans are over a year and a half old.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee January 27, 2017, 10:32 am

      Hi Bruce — I confirmed with Robinson Plans and Utopian Villas purchased the plans for the home and are building these with the Robinson’s full approval. We did change the name of the post and added clarification, though, so that this won’t appear like theft on anyone’s part. Thanks for your concern, though!

  • Michael January 27, 2017, 8:13 am

    Its an extended version of the 20ft THOW we have seen before.
    Unfortunately it doesn’t look so harmonious inside. The added downstairs bedroom appears really attached and is too close to the French doors which I like.
    Beside that the pictures are showing the base model.
    I would prefer a lift up bed above the pictured couch instead of the loft. Doing so the floor plan needs to be mirror inverted to have the higher part above the living area. Than you ca eliminate the ladder and use that for a full size fridge and wardrobe instead of the staircase.

    • Rick C February 22, 2017, 11:25 am

      “Its an extended version of the 20ft THOW we have seen before.
      Unfortunately it doesn’t look so harmonious inside.”

      The 28′ model is not a design change by Utopian–both places, them and Robinson, have 20, 24, and 28-foot models.

  • Kim W January 27, 2017, 6:35 pm

    A lot of good ideas, but coming down the steps to go to the toilet during the night must be fun, as yo have to slide the steps out of the way to get to the bathroom, then back in to place to get back up to bed! Or maybe upstairs is only for those who don’t need night time toilet trips???!!

  • Brian January 29, 2017, 6:21 pm

    Is it being nitpicky to say the TV is in the wrong spot? It is? Ok..forget I said anything. 😉

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee January 30, 2017, 7:11 am

      Haha 🙂

    • oxide February 22, 2017, 10:17 am

      The TV is definitely in the wrong spot. In fact, I would put the TV where the shelving is next to the sofa, and move the shelving to where the TV is. Then I could fit in a corner sectional in that end to watch TV, and have shelving in the kitchen where it is needed more. (You might also have to move that HVAC unit across to the other wall, above that window, to make more room for the shelving.) But those are minor changes that anyone can do. Other than that it’s a pretty nice setup.

      • Rick C February 22, 2017, 11:29 am

        In my (admittedly limited) experience, most THOWs (and regular RVs! I don’t mean to single THOWs out here) don’t put the TV in an optimal place or angle.

        In this case, the Dragonfly design probably expects that sofa to be a pull-out bed. That leads pretty directly to not being able to make the layout changes you mention.

        Of course, there’s no reason one couldn’t do it your way, especially if you gave up the idea of having a bed/sofa on the first floor, or used a sofa/sectional that could be converted/used as a bed in your preferred orientation, or whatever.

  • Denise January 30, 2017, 7:30 am

    Will the steps/shelves for that ladder hold a 200 lb. person trying to climb up to the loft?

  • ROSEE February 2, 2017, 1:16 pm

    Everything looks great. But I would have left the loft out.

  • Sandi B February 4, 2017, 3:22 am

    This is an interesting design and there some fun ideas that could be incorporated in any design — I like the “sneaky” stairs”, but think that some sort of hydraulics are needed to assist the pullout and push- in function. That TV probably would not last a month in it’s current location nothing like a TV being bathed in steam and grease on a regular bases day in and day out. I also do not see the 10′ wide part, looks more like the standard 8.6′ to me, but that could just be the picture angles. I like the idea of the pull out table, but it takes up storage drawer space in that counter — I think a folding unit would be better and could be accommodated. Also I do not think you need the dinning table, especially with the pull out table, I would want kitchen cabinets along that wall. I also want full size refrigerator and oven/stove which could be accommodated if the kitchen were done as a pullman type kitchen. I like the wood in the bathroom and how the washer/dryer was accommodated. I think the loft could be bigger — I like the “flex” room I would use that as a closet and office space. It is interesting to see how someone has taken plans and made a larger unit and how well that works. Also, I would never, ever put a rubber roof on such a unit — I would go with steel, but not a rubber roof — too much maintenance, too easily damaged, have to be specially coated every year etc.. I am sure he was thinking weight, but in my humble opinion, being very familiar with rubber roofs, that rubber roof has to go. But really like a lot of the ideas incorporated in this unit. Thanks so much for sharing.

  • alice h February 22, 2017, 4:29 pm

    Great! I couldn’t remember where I saw that staircase so now I can bookmark this. I really like that staircase! I won’t have a sleeping loft but this would be a great way to get up and down from loft storage while carrying stuff. Much better than a ladder, completely out of the way when not needed and no loss of storage spaces.

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