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Tumbleweed Fencl Style Tiny House for Sale: Would You Buy or Build it?

I had to show you this Tumbleweed Fencl style tiny house for sale.

It’s built right onto a trailer so it’s mobile and on wheels just like an RV or travel trailer.

Since it’s 19′ long and 8’6″ wide it meets legal road standards so you can tow it just like you would any trailer.

It’s used but has never been lived in even though it’s ready to live in and was relocated once. It comes with full hook ups for water, grey water, and electric.

Used Tumbleweed Tiny House For Sale (SOLD)

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See and learn more (photos, price, location, how to buy it, etc.) below:

Interior of Finished DIY Tumbleweed Tiny House

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In the photo above you can see the kitchen, sleeping loft area, and more.

The kitchen has just about every feature you would need including a gas stove and oven, mini refrigerator, large sink, and more.

Ladder to Loft System (With Storage Closet)

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Inside you’ll find a closet and plenty of shelves and other storage nooks inside for all of your belongings.

Loft Space Upstairs

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Loft Storage Above Entrance

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Bathroom with Bath Tub

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The bathroom even has a bath tub which is sort of rare for tiny houses.

Toilet

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There’s also a loveable loo toilet in there but you can always change to a composting toilet, incinerating toilet, or just a more “normal” flush RV toilet.

Tiny Home in Tow

Asking price: $29,000 (sold). Location: Pompano Beach, Florida.

More info here. (SOLD)

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 10 comments… add one }
  • Michele Reed February 28, 2014, 9:48 am

    How much ? Where is it located ?
    Interested !

  • Beth DeRoos February 28, 2014, 2:04 pm

    Has to be one of the most inefficient loft accesses I have seen. Not to mention the loft light would be deemed unsafe in many areas. Hit your head, break the bulb and have a dangerous mess. Just to claustrophobic.

  • linda February 28, 2014, 5:25 pm

    do u have a site where people are building and selling a tiny house?

  • Bill from Boomhower, Texas March 1, 2014, 11:57 am

    I wouldn’t do either. Those aren’t built to pull. They’re built to sell. I used to pull stuff like that for a living. Any mobile home is built for one or to pulls, to get it to the original purchaser. During that move, they start to become structurally unsound and un-roadworthy in a hurry, and a road hazzard.
    If I wnted something that size that would last, and I could move anytime, and with furnishings still inside as well, I’d start with a 20′ container, two 9000lb tandom wheel axles, and an I-Beam frame w/king pin, and gooseneck adapter if neccessary. It would be plumb, squared, rigged and roadworthy many years after the deterioration of the unit pictured. I’m assuming of course, that mobility is a major consideration of this design. It won’t be as cute, but could be easily insulated, wired, and plumbed, and you wouldn’t need to unload all of your belongings, every time you move it, as with mobile homes. I can’t see what kind of wheels that one has, but mobile home wheels, tires, and axles are not designed for prolonged use. The reason you have to unload everything before moving your mobile home is not to protect your stuff. It’s to try to keep the mobile home intact as best as possible during any move. Screws start loosening as soon as they’re pulled away from the factory, and they’re to cheaply constructed to be pulled any farther than neccessary to get your money.

    • pat szumski March 1, 2014, 12:45 pm

      thank you for the reality check. i think these problems have been lurking at the edges of my mind as i look at the various tiny houses. also. although i really dont like to see people in the house photos, when i do it is a bit of a shock to see how small the space actually is… i guess i fool myself into seeing more space when bodies arent present. yes, i can see containers as a more reasonable option and there was a 3-20ft side by side, single story container home design that seemed a good option.

    • Laura May 3, 2014, 6:35 am

      Wow! You make some good points! Good to have someone in your profession to point those things out. One of the reasons I really wanted one of these homes was the ability to move when I wanted to. But I want something long lasting.

      If there was a way to make the container home look more like the fencl, I would be all in. Well… If I had the money that is! 🙂

    • Doc December 10, 2014, 5:45 pm

      Bill,
      i think you must be new to these homes. these are not mobile homes or manufactured homes as you may have pulled. the companies building these and most of the diy homes are glued and screwed joints with “strong tie” type hurricane strap and bracket reinforcements at those same joints. at the corners there are diagonal braces of wood or metal as well to resist torsion stress while on the road. most are built to withstand wind speeds greater than you would encounter while pulling them. though they are rarely pulled as frequently as an r.v. they would likely withstand it as long as your wallet can fill the tank of your 3/4 or 1 ton truck needed to pull them.

      the fact is, most people build or have them built so that they “can”move as life changes or job changes demand. a few are for full timers but they don’t move as much as most would believe. camp in the south for the winter, find someplace north to spend the summer and back again.

      most have full water features for potable/grey/black water storage. most have full power off grid systems or full r.v. hookups for same.

      aside from a mortgage and property taxes, they have everything your home does. oh, except they can move whenever they want or need to! even if it’s just to get out of the way of that approaching hurricane! then they can move right back again!!!

      these are mostly built on car hauler trailers that can handle the loads with tires rated for the same load for highway use. the larger the home the larger the trailer. some are now built on trailers made just for this tiny home industry to meet these same load requirements. one, two or three axle versions can be seen on these pages. most relate that pulling them has posed few problems when you know what you’re doing pulling a load this size/weight. someone with your experience would have no trouble with these on the road or after. even with some of the larger “model home ” sized units not meant to be moved as often, though those units require special permits to pull. they really can handle it. just contact one of they many manufacturers Alex has listed on these pages. they can fill you in on all the technical details.

      on your final point, yes, they will still get your money. every man deserves pay for the work he does. or, you can build your own and save about half the cost most list these for sale for. then the quality would all be up to you. 🙂 check them out. you will find these are not as bad as you might be thinking.

  • Cheryl Huskins March 2, 2014, 9:16 pm

    Last year I attended a “Tumbleweed” workshop in Asheville, NC and learned a huge amount on how these babies are constructed. All the issues you are concerned with have been dealt with beautifully. This is not instruction in how to build a cheap shack that will fall apart in a few years. This is a lesson on how HOMES should be constructed with class. I would encourage you to do more research and find out about the love and care these people put into this kind of workmanship. I got a reality check when I went and am not ready to build, but I highly encourage others to do so. It was money well spent.

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