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Man Invents Expandable Tiny Houses with Pop Outs

Expandable Tiny Houses with Pop Outs is a guest post by Jay Oistead

This is Jay with Ragsdale Homes and I wanted to share with you some of our current tiny house projects we’re working on.

Directly below is a sneak preview of our new Sunday House which is a transforming tiny home because it has pop outs.

We designed it small so that we can transport it cross country to attend workshops, conventions, and other events.

Once the home is on site and expanded it offers 216 sq. ft. of living space while the perimeter dimensions are only 8’x10′ while traveling.

We are developing patent pending ‘Room Roll Outs’ so parts of the home can expand and increase livable square footage once on site.

Ragsdale Homes Tiny Houses with Pop Outs: Sunday House

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I encourage you to see and learn more below:

One of the RROs (Room Roll Outs) is a kitchen with a portable island counter.

The other RRO is an office with a unique expanding desk.

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Our design also features a wet shower and toilet combination with a new dry flush toilet as one of the options.

We’ll be offering one queen size loft and one twin size sleeping ca coon.

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The roof consists of shingles and the 8’x10′ structure expands into 216 sq. ft. of space.

Best of all, it can be towed by an SUV or lightweight truck. Later on, though, we’ll do the same thing with a 24′ trailer to expand the space to 390 sq. ft. This will be a great option for those who do not like sleeping lofts because of the climbing.

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Another great thing about what we’re doing that might benefit you in the future is our tiny house trailers.

We’re introducing the first ever convertible trailer built to convert from SIP construction or convention stick construction.

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We will be offering our trailers with a 6″ thick SIP floor already on the trailer. And our trailers are also the lowest to the ground which gives you more space to work with on your tiny house.

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You can also see the extra support we’ve designed to further strengthen the trailer and prepare it to last with a tiny house to load and tow.

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Above and below is a an example of what it would look like with our SIP flooring installed.

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Ragsdale Homes Next Generation of Transforming Tiny Houses

Video: Interior of their Prototype Tiny Home

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 33 comments… add one }
  • LaMar Alexander LaMar May 7, 2014, 10:13 am

    Patent pending? Come on guys- slide out trailers have been around for a long time.

    Looks like it will add a lot of expense and weight to a house that is already too heavy for most vehicles to tow safely.

    What is the estimated trailer weight and vehicle axle capacity needed?

    How about designing two houses on wheels with shed roofs that can be set side by side like a double wide?

    Oh wait- I already designed that:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONryh0E9eWE&list=PLkMD_AP2K4vRNdL-FUZtUmSQhIvdF6ACy

    Sorry I don’t mean to stifle creative designs but most houses on wheels are already way too heavy and adding additional walls, beefing up the trailer and adding slideouts is only going to create more towing problems and most people are looking for ideas to build their own.

    What would be the price for one of these patented models?

    Once the price goes over $20,000 you are no longer reaching the market for most people that are interested in these types of homes.

    If you want to go that direction and need more room look at park models. People want low cost DIY designs and not high priced untowable designs that require patented materials.

    Just my opinion!

    LaMar

    • Ralph Sly May 7, 2014, 4:04 pm

      And most of your opinion stifled me from commenting as once again you are so right. Cute concept. I often wonder what Mae West could contribute to the tiny house community? Probably unfold one from a handbag!

    • Jay Olstead May 8, 2014, 1:24 am

      Dear LaMar,

      I wanted to take some time to respond to your negative comments left on this blog. You are certainly entitled to your opinion. After all, we do live in America, free speech and all that.

      1.) Come on Guys-slide out trailers have been around a long time. Last time I checked, slide outs or tip outs as they’re called, are what saved the ailing RV industry years ago. The RV industry was on the downslide when someone started offering an alternative to skinny hallways and having to turn sideways to get somewhere. After the slide out made it’s debut, the RV industry finally started to prosper. Now, most people, shopping for an RV, wouldn’t consider buying one without at least two, but four is better. Now there was a sense of spaciousness that never existed before. RV slide outs use complicated, troublesome, expensive hydra ulic or electric worm gear units. To use your words, they slide out. Our “ Room Roll Outs” don’t slide, they roll out. Also, the entire room from floor to ceiling rolls out as opposed to an RV which, in most cases, only a portion of a room slides out. Usually 32” to 36” and on very expensive models, they move out 42”. Our “ RRO” rolls out 48”. Big difference!

      2.) Most houses on wheels are already too heavy and additional walls, beefing up the trailer and adding slide outs is only going to create more towing problems, and most people are looking for ideas to build their own. I don’t know about the weight of the homes on your website, however, if they are made of wood then you are 70% heavier and 35% weaker in construction strength. Our homes are built with aluminum or steel clad SIP panels. Stronger, lighter, quicker to build, requires less skilled personnel, 2 to 3 times the insulation (“R”) factor. Less mildew, moisture, and bug problems. Our floors which includes belly pan, insulation, etc. goes down in about 3 hours. How many hours do you think the average tiny home builder spends laying his or her floor?
      Ask them! Since our homes are already 70% lighter than what you build with, our light weight “RROs” add only about 15% to 20% more weight but, more important, up to 50% more livable space on the same trailer. Our new trailer, with all of our new features, will be priced about the same as the ones being sold by Tumbleweed and others with twice the strength and loaded with features never seen before. Our trailer addresses issues currently being swept under the rug.

      3.)Oh wait-I already designed that: If I wanted a double wide mobile home, I would buy one. You state on YouTube that two of your structures when connected together would feature a footprint of 16’ by 16’. If my math is correct, that relates to 256 square feet, with two trailers needed to create the Siamese Twins. Why would I want that when our smallest model has over 360 square feet under one roof, one trailer.

      4.) What would be the price for one of those patented models? Once the price goes over $ 20,000 you are no longer reaching the market for most people that are interested in these types of homes. Last time I checked, the cost of materials and appliances to build a top notch tiny home on a trailer was between 18,000 and 20,000. This does not include labor. If one of the big three builds this home the complete price will range between 38,000 and 60,000. Therefore, to save a large amount of money, one must build their own. We will be offering trailers, house shells, kits, plans, etc and be very competitive on the price. Even though we offer at least 40% more space our price will not be 40% more. Perhaps 20% to 25 % more. You can always buy our new Sunday House, built on a trailer 8 feet by 10 feet, offering 216 square feet at a price below other homes that are 216 square feet. And, you can pull it with most larger SUV, light duty trucks, or vans.

      If you want to go that direction and need more room look at park models. People want low cost DIY designs and not high priced designs that require patented materials. I don’t see any mention on your website stating that your homes or structures have an Engineers stamp of certification. I believe that people want a product that has been proven to be sturdy. One that can withstand strong winds, movement while being transporting, heavy rain, and snow just to name a few. The people I talk to on a daily basis want quality and intrinsic value.

      In conclusion, I believe that , subconsciously, many tiny house people are in denial about their experience living in cramped quarters. Men and Women have a hard enough time cohabiting in 3,000 square feet without fighting like cats and dogs. Yes, some are happy and content to live the tiny house lifestyle. I realize that, however, up to 40% of America is obese. This does not include those of us who are overweight. They want to live in tiny houses too. How about people with disabilities or those who are nearing retirement, wanting to downsize. Where are they going to live? How about the veteran who was injured in the war and he or she has difficulty navigating a bunk bed ladder. How about a small family wanting to aquire the tiny house dream. At Ragsdale Homes we deliver Tiny Wheeled Estates, not tiny houses on wheels
      Dear LaMar,

      I wanted to take some time to respond to your negative comments left on this blog. You are certainly entitled to your opinion. After all, we do live in America, free speech and all that.

      1.) Come on Guys-slide out trailers have been around a long time. Last time I checked, slide outs or tip outs as they’re called, are what saved the ailing RV industry years ago. The RV industry was on the downslide when someone started offering an alternative to skinny hallways and having to turn sideways to get somewhere. After the slide out made it’s debut, the RV industry finally started to prosper. Now, most people, shopping for an RV, wouldn’t consider buying one without at least two, but four is better. Now there was a sense of spaciousness that never existed before. RV slide outs use complicated, troublesome, expensive hydra ulic or electric worm gear units. To use your words, they slide out. Our “ Room Roll Outs” don’t slide, they roll out. Also, the entire room from floor to ceiling rolls out as opposed to an RV which, in most cases, only a portion of a room slides out. Usually 32” to 36” and on very expensive models, they move out 42”. Our “ RRO” rolls out 48”. Big difference!

      2.) Most houses on wheels are already too heavy and additional walls, beefing up the trailer and adding slide outs is only going to create more towing problems, and most people are looking for ideas to build their own. I don’t know about the weight of the homes on your website, however, if they are made of wood then you are 70% heavier and 35% weaker in construction strength. Our homes are built with aluminum or steel clad SIP panels. Stronger, lighter, quicker to build, requires less skilled personnel, 2 to 3 times the insulation (“R”) factor. Less mildew, moisture, and bug problems. Our floors which includes belly pan, insulation, etc. goes down in about 3 hours. How many hours do you think the average tiny home builder spends laying his or her floor?
      Ask them! Since our homes are already 70% lighter than what you build with, our light weight “RROs” add only about 15% to 20% more weight but, more important, up to 50% more livable space on the same trailer. Our new trailer, with all of our new features, will be priced about the same as the ones being sold by Tumbleweed and others with twice the strength and loaded with features never seen before. Our trailer addresses issues currently being swept under the rug.

      3.)Oh wait-I already designed that: If I wanted a double wide mobile home, I would buy one. You state on YouTube that two of your structures when connected together would feature a footprint of 16’ by 16’. If my math is correct, that relates to 256 square feet, with two trailers needed to create the Siamese Twins. Why would I want that when our smallest model has over 360 square feet under one roof, one trailer.

      4.) What would be the price for one of those patented models? Once the price goes over $ 20,000 you are no longer reaching the market for most people that are interested in these types of homes. Last time I checked, the cost of materials and appliances to build a top notch tiny home on a trailer was between 18,000 and 20,000. This does not include labor. If one of the big three builds this home the complete price will range between 38,000 and 60,000. Therefore, to save a large amount of money, one must build their own. We will be offering trailers, house shells, kits, plans, etc and be very competitive on the price. Even though we offer at least 40% more space our price will not be 40% more. Perhaps 20% to 25 % more. You can always buy our new Sunday House, built on a trailer 8 feet by 10 feet, offering 216 square feet at a price below other homes that are 216 square feet. And, you can pull it with most larger SUV, light duty trucks, or vans.

      If you want to go that direction and need more room look at park models. People want low cost DIY designs and not high priced designs that require patented materials. I don’t see any mention on your website stating that your homes or structures have an Engineers stamp of certification. I believe that people want a product that has been proven to be sturdy. One that can withstand strong winds, movement while being transporting, heavy rain, and snow just to name a few. The people I talk to on a daily basis want quality and intrinsic value.

      In conclusion, I believe that , subconsciously, many tiny house people are in denial about their experience living in cramped quarters. Men and Women have a hard enough time cohabiting in 3,000 square feet without fighting like cats and dogs. Yes, some are happy and content to live the tiny house lifestyle. I realize that, however, up to 40% of America is obese. This does not include those of us who are overweight. They want to live in tiny houses too. How about people with disabilities or those who are nearing retirement, wanting to downsize. Where are they going to live? How about the veteran who was injured in the war and he or she has difficulty navigating a bunk bed ladder. How about a small family wanting to aquire the tiny house dream. At Ragsdale Homes we deliver Tiny Wheeled Estates, not tiny houses on wheels

      • LaMar Alexander LaMar May 8, 2014, 8:18 am

        Dear Jerry,

        Thanks for responding but I think you need to clarify some of your responses because they do not match the description on the article.

        You state that people don’t want lofts with difficult ladders to access yet your description clearly states you have two loft beds and that is shown in your pics.

        You state people want more walking room but your “roll outs are being used as window seats which would not add any additional waking room and would make putting any furnishings against walls more difficult reducing space.

        You are trying to compare a 24 foot trailer and with a 16 foot trailer claiming it would have more space but two 8×24 trailers would give you 384 sqft foot print not including any lofts. Mores than enough room for a bedroom on a main floor.

        What you have is a concept plan and until it is actually built I am skeptical of the weight of the structure and slideouts being road worthy.

        If your plan is to build high priced “estates” on wheels I wish you luck but I do not see that as the direction people are going that are building their own units and the price would be prohibitive for average people.

        Again, just my opinion!

        LaMar

        • J July 26, 2014, 3:30 am

          You both offer solutions and there is room in this industry for all entrepreneurs Mr. Lamar. I view your public sharing of opinions on this thread less as sharing concerns/ideas between visionaries and see it more as a short sighted attack on a competing business owner. Professionalism dictates your initial concerns should have been addressed privately. You both offer solutions that will speak to the public’s demands.

    • Draegrisious May 4, 2015, 1:10 am

      Wow, i know this is a year old but i just have to say… LaMar….. Mate… With this unprofessional attitude you couldn’t pay me to take one of your houses.

      1. This house is made of SIPs. Light, sturdy, more money. Pros and cons as with everything, but weight wise it’s superior to wood. It’d be more expensive but at least there is a very obvious reason why. At the very least, if someone does not want to buy this themselves they can atleast do it themselves.

      2. How is having slide outs not a way of saving walking room? Rub your two brain cells together and picture this. I have a 4 foot hallway in one tiny house and a 4 foot hallway with a 4 foot slide out (making it basically an 8 foot wide hallway). Now i want to put a 4 foot wide couch in said hallways. In the non-slide out hallway i’d have to now crawl over the couch to get through. In the hallway with the slide out i’d put the couch in the slide out and still have 4 feet of hallway.

      What were you THINKING mate? Or were you just trying to talk whatever smack you could think of?

      3. A tiny house that has to be hauled with two trailers is just plain stupid. If i wanted a 16 x 24 tiny house THAT badly, i’d have it put on a foundation. Who the hell is going to haul a second trailer for me when i want to go somewhere? The fucking half a house fairy?

      Not to entirely shit all over your idea, but if you want to shit on an idea just because it is, quite frankly, better than yours, you deserve it.

      I’ve seen you make a fair share of shitastic feedback on here. Some was justified, but with this you’ve done nothing but paint yourself as immature, rude and unprofessional. And for that, you lose. GOOD DAY SIR.

  • Dale May 7, 2014, 11:42 am

    This is wonderful and please continue the supreme design motifs! This is just what I need! The time for SIP is NOW, finally.

    • Jay Olstead May 7, 2014, 1:48 pm

      Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today!
      Thank you for your kind words.
      Ciao,
      Jay

      • jacob & nancy tritt August 8, 2014, 6:39 pm

        LOVE your tiny home ideas! Very inspiring. My husband and i, 3 years married, are looking into SIPs not knowing much about them and discovered there are a few different kinds. Would love to get a hold you for some advice on that as well as some other ideas you have. We drew our “dream tiny home” on google sketch up and share a lot of similarities with your models!! Of course, we have NO idea of how to actually go about it. Just dreaming~ Will try and get in touch with you, or if you see this and have our email, we would love to hear from you! Team JanCy

  • Jerry May 7, 2014, 11:58 am

    Back to the drawing board, thanks for making my “open” designs seem cramped.

    Seriously, very nice designs, look forward to seeing more!

  • Connie May 7, 2014, 12:14 pm

    I love your new tiny house model!! Love, love it! How charming. Incredible designs. Please put me on your email list! I am saving to buy two of them!

  • Connie May 7, 2014, 12:17 pm

    Incredible that they are only 8 x 10 feet when towing, but expand to over 200 sq ft!!! For this reason, it is my favorite tiny house ever!!! 🙂

  • Mauiminnow May 8, 2014, 12:56 am

    So exciting! The Tiny House movement is finally seeing something completely different! I want!

  • Michael May 8, 2014, 9:38 am

    Jay, very good reply to La Mar. The traditional design of tiny homes are a shrinking copy of a home which are put on wheels to tow them occasionally. The high weight limits size to avoid a bigger truck.
    SIPs are the way to go to get a bigger and lighter home on wheels. They offer the option to get less height when you don’t need a cramped sleeping loft and your fuel consumption is going down too.
    Unfortunately I don’t have FB. Is there another way to get in touch with you guys?
    Thanks

  • Matt King July 9, 2014, 10:12 pm

    I think this is a great idea. I have being thinking of finding a way of expanding space in a tiny home. This takes the best of “traditional stick built” construction and adding the ideas of the latest RV s and motorhomes. FYI I have a degree in Architecture, I am a licensed builder, and a commercial property inspector. I am looking forward to the seeing the plans. Great job!

  • Rabo July 30, 2014, 6:49 pm

    What are SIP walls or floors?

  • Maja Kricker July 30, 2014, 7:08 pm

    I absolutely love the design and the pop-outs and the house is a perfect size, but I have a question. My experience with living in a SIP house was that it doesn’t seem to breathe very well and gets stuffy. I sort of felt like I was living in a big mac container. Admittedly, the house was built 18 years ago and perhaps the technology has improved. I don’t mean this to be negative because I love your concept, but would appreciate your comments on this. Am I the only one who is bothered by this?

  • Marsha Cowan July 30, 2014, 8:24 pm

    Ok, so I think it’s great! The slide outs add a lot of exterior and interior character to the shape of the house, and of course more room. Loft sleeping areas are for those who want to climb into a loft to sleep, and there are many people who do, not just young ones, so live and let live. I am 62 this year, and my first tiny house had a ladder to the loft which I loved. It was like sleeping in a hug (have I already mentioned that before?), and I still miss it. Grant you, I really like the more permanent and multifunctional stairs better than a ladder, but I digress. The trailer is the most important aspect of building a tiny house, and the trailer in this home is exquisitely designed, strong, and functional. The house is beautiful, and I think you will have a large market for your tiny expanding homes. Word of advice, life is short…don’t waste your time trying to reason with the unreasonable, focus on the positive remarks (or creatively and helpfully critical) and let the other ones slide. Just saying…

  • LouAnn July 31, 2014, 3:48 pm

    I love your new Sunday House! Is there a way to incorporate a storage stair case into your design? Perhaps collapsible, locking cubes? How soon will the expanded plans, kits, etc., that you mentioned, be available? When will the prototype of the Sunday House be built so we can see video of a real home? As an interior designer I love what you are doing. Please put me on your mailing list! I live in Cedarburg, Wisconsin, a small historic community just north of Milwaukee. I am exploring the possibility of holding an information meeting to see if I can organize a tiny house group (like Macy did in Idaho) in my area with the hope of this group hosting a tiny house workshop here in the future. Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated. Cedarburg is only 2 hours north of Chicago, where there is an occasional workshop held, but this area is typically less expensive and only another 2 hours north.

    • Dawn Zimmerman August 19, 2014, 2:04 pm

      Hey LouAnn,

      I live in Madison, WI, and would be very interested in joining your tiny house group. I also would need stairs to the loft and look forward to built prototypes that we can check out online. Feel free to facebook me if you want to talk more! 🙂

      • Alex August 19, 2014, 2:13 pm

        Cool! I love it when people get to connect here 🙂 Thanks Dawn and LouAnn!

  • LouAnn August 1, 2014, 12:06 pm

    What kind and rating of insulation do you use in the floor and the roll outs? This is a major concern for those who live in cold climates.

    • Jay Olstead October 1, 2014, 6:57 pm

      Insulation rating depends on which SIP/MIP that you use. The MIP that we are e currently using is R9.5 per inch. Therefore. if your talking about 4 inches then R38. If 6″ panel then R 57. What do you have in your wallet?
      Ciao,
      Jay

  • Beth August 2, 2014, 6:35 pm

    What about the plumbing? Would the low floor design allow for R/V type plumbing so you could have fresh/black/grey water tanks under the trailer? I love the idea and would love to see the longer 24′ model when you get it going. I have had a 24′ travel trailer without a slide out and stayed in my Mom’s 30′ travel trailer with a slide out. I have also lived in 12′ and 14′ mobile homes. It gets very cramped very quickly. I do live alone at the moment, but, I want to travel and might have a companion that I won’t necessarily be sharing a bed with, so have a bit more room would really help for long term use. Some of us don’t want to just plant ourselves in one spot, I like the idea it would be lighter weight for traveling. I would want a downstairs bedroom and stairs to the loft instead of a ladder. Keep working on it, you are going in the right direction. IMHO

  • dawn March 5, 2015, 12:34 am

    when is someone going to design and market a tiny house with a loft that has roof and walls which can slide up and make the loft full size when the building is parked? then you could have a full second floor over the first and still collapse the upper floor to a loft size for travel.

  • Mary Ann April 10, 2015, 11:33 am

    A sliding-up roof has been done on a Prevost bus. Owned by a celebrity but I can’t remember who. But these buses are in the $$$$$ price range. Also one tiny home owner built a foldable “A line” roof, but it was for transporting… Not to be erected on a regular basis when travelling. Also the new Tear Drop has a rising section to allow more space on the inside. All give more head room, but totally different approaches.

  • Rob Mair May 24, 2015, 6:37 am

    I’m currently building a tiny house on wheels using SIPs. Here in Australia we call them cool-room panels. Available sizes are 2”,
    3” and 4” thick by 46” wide and up to 25′ long.

    I did my cost research and if using timber frames, lined inside and
    out and insulated, then a paint or sealed finish, the cost was nearly 1/3 more than SIBs and that does not include the longer time to build
    with stick frames. I vote for SIBs.

    The tiny house is 8’wide x 26′ long with an added end 6′ rollout bedroom. No loft.
    My opinion based on the experience of using SIBs is that Jay is a leader in the tiny house building world.

  • CUtsey70 June 2, 2015, 12:21 pm

    Thank you so much for creating this!
    I have been in RV’s and the slide makes a huge difference. The idea that I could have a slide out on my tiny home is beyond my imagination and makes me excited at the same time.

    I would like more info and ideas of floor plans. I am looking to build on a truck(industrial panel) frame.

  • Fran Chiles November 4, 2015, 4:12 pm

    I love your design and wish more builders would incorporate your work into their builds…I have only seen a few tiny homes with pop-outs, slide-outs….I have asked most of the builders on the east coast and none want to make slide outs…That is the only way I could live in a tiny home…I believe you are on the West Coast? If not I would like more info on building a home like this as a 8×24 base or if you could sell plans to a builder here in Virginia that would agree to build it for me. Thank you !

  • Shirley Fisher September 29, 2016, 7:10 pm

    Ragsdale Model, How can I get a blue print copy of this model.
    Thank you,
    ShirleyFisher

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