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Tiny House Built by Students at Western Sierra YouthBuild

This is a tiny house built by students at Western Sierra YouthBuild.


It’s the only high school in Nevada County that offers vocational training and academic courses.

The tiny house is located in Grass Valley, California. It’s for sale for $22,500 or best offer.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thanks!

Tiny House Built by Students at Western Sierra YouthBuild


Highlights:

  • Traditionally framed
  • 2×4 insulated walls
  • Painted drywall interior
  • Metal roof
  • Custom made trailer
  • 160 sq. ft. plus loft
  • Maple butcher block countertop
  • Larg sink
  • LED lights
  • Ceiling fan
  • Shower with sliding glass doors
  • Composting toilet
  • Grass Valley, CA 95949

From the builder: 

This house was built by Western Sierra YouthBuild, the only high school in Nevada County that offers vocational skills training along with academic courses as a means to gaining a high school diploma. Our students are voluntarily making positive life choices as a means of overcoming very real obstacles like homelessness, domestic and substance abuse among other things. We have an amazing program and would very much like to keep it funded through building these tiny houses.

Resources: 

Our big thanks to Eli for sharing!

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.




{ 21 comments… add one }
  • Richard Hansen December 10, 2016, 9:28 am

    Gr8 program and focus. It provides these youth with opportunities for confidence and success.

  • AVD December 10, 2016, 1:37 pm

    I am a big fan of school districts having or even rediscovering the value and need for vocational / industrial training classes.

    Not everyone is college bound, but sooo many educators and school administrators keep insisting that all high school students should be pushed down the college prep track.

    Because school districts seem so bent on a college-only path, the construction and manufacturing sectors are quickly running out of interested and skilled students to enter into training and apprentice programs.

    A sizable number of students are not college bound because of affordability economics or lack of interest. Lack of an interesting path through high school and into a skilled trade upon graduation directly results in abnormal and unacceptable dropout rates among students.

    There is a serious shortage of students with entry level trade skills graduating from high schools and prepared to step into entry level construction and manufacturing jobs.

    Unfortunately students who can find high schools that have serious vocational education programs are only being taught basic skills and not being exposed to the critical design evaluation and thinking that is needed to transform a so-so “plan book” solution into a superior product that will serve the end user at a much higher level.

    The highlighted project in this article is a good example of a nicely finished product that suffers from not being critically evaluated before the first nail was pounded.

    Kids today are very smart and may even be more visually aware and crit-capable than past generations. After learning how to read a set of construction plans, the next step should have been to direct the students to analyze the plans and have them describe how they would “live in and use the spaces” If the students unmasked flaws, then how would they change the design to make it better, safer, more economical to build and easier to sell.

    All of those learned pre-construction analytical skills will be needed someday when the student enters their chosen trade or profession.

    Smart companies have “suggestion boxes” and employees are encouraged to make suggestions that result in better solutions and are rewarded when a suggestion improves a process or product.

    We need to re-discover the high value to students and society that comes from teaching kids how to complete the “eye-hand-brain” connections. If we, as a society, cannot educate students to be thinkers, creators and builders, then the future will see robots taking over the good paying jobs that so many adults and entry level workers are seeking.

    AVD

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie December 12, 2016, 1:23 pm

      I do agree students should be able to think creatively, but I also think this is an awesome tiny house! — Tiny House Talk Team

  • Kathy December 10, 2016, 2:46 pm

    Kudos to Youth Build! This is a lovely tiny home!

  • Gigi December 10, 2016, 5:24 pm

    Great project and great value for a lucky buyer.

  • ROSEE December 10, 2016, 6:21 pm

    Lovely! A job well done!

  • Susanne December 11, 2016, 6:16 pm

    Impressed every time to see a program such as this!
    Yes if more of our youth learn skills such as these maybe we won’t need to hire people from outside to do the job.?

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie December 12, 2016, 1:06 pm

      Very good for these kids to learn these skills! — Tiny House Talk Team

  • Anthonie December 11, 2016, 9:44 pm

    AVD Ditto:) Well said and TRUE

  • glenda hill March 16, 2017, 12:11 pm

    I am in need of help to build from a 24ft trailer frame on my property. I have been trying to find any one in my area that knows anything enough to help me. If you know of some students able and willing to make a project come alive this spring I’m ready, Hargerville ON, Canada

  • Lisa E. March 16, 2017, 1:10 pm

    While I agree with AVD in his well-written, thoughtful, and thought provoking post, I also think the kids did a great job with this and can be proud of their efforts. Okay, so maybe the interior articulation could use some future tweaking, but on whole, a really good job. The kids can learn from this creation and go on to new and improved versions. This project also makes the kids in this generation aware of the existence of Tiny Houses and how they could serve Seniors, the handicapped, Singles, low-income and no-income (homeless) people. I hope the shop teachers are discussing zoning and code laws that prevent Tiny Houses. Maybe it will be the younger generation that will break the stranglehold the Real Estate people (Chamber of Commerce) has on land use.

  • Patty March 16, 2017, 10:25 pm

    Well done! I especially like the bright interior.

  • Sgmaps March 17, 2017, 2:50 am

    Great tiny home, very nice finishes inside but I would add a railing on the wall for the storage stairs and I was unsure of where the living room type of space is located. It is more than worth the price being asked, it is actually a steal at that price considering all the work is done and nicely at that with enough room/wall space to make tweaks that you might want.

    • Sgmaps March 17, 2017, 2:53 am

      Just looked over the pics again and I am guessing that the area where there is the table and chair is the living room area. OOPS.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee March 20, 2017, 10:47 am

      Yes it’s a good deal!

  • Deborah trescott March 17, 2017, 8:01 am

    I LOVE this tiny home! I especially love how open and bright this place is. So many tiny homes seem to be so dark and depressing but this is just flooded with light! It is just so cheerful! Great job students!

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