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The London Tiny House by Ty Rodou

This is a tiny house on wheels call the London. It was built in Landeleau, France by Ty Rodou and featured on Tiny House Town. How do you like it?


The London Tiny House by Ty Rodou

The London Tiny House by Ty Rodou

The London Tiny House by Ty Rodou

The London Tiny House by Ty Rodou


Highlights

  • All wood exterior
  • Natural wood interior
  • Kitchen with stove
  • Lofted bedroom
  • Living room
  • Working windows
  • Blue accents

Quote

The home is designed and built by Ty Rodou, a builder from the French town of Landeleau. His one-of-a-kind tiny house features an all-wood exterior with beautiful blue accents. Inside the home is a minimal interior with operable windows to allow in fresh air.1

Resources

  1. http://www.tinyhousetown.net/2017/11/london-tiny-house–ty-rodou.html
  2. http://www.tinyhouse.bzh

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!




{ 6 comments… add one }
  • Larry November 22, 2017, 9:04 pm

    Looks great, love to see more of the inside.

  • Michael November 23, 2017, 5:48 am

    Interesting design and for sure less wind resistance on the road. Like the high mounted windows which provides light, great cross ventilation but maintain privacy.
    Dislike loft and the overall height and wondering how they can achieve the weight under 3500 kg. Their website pictures more interesting shapes.

    • James D. November 24, 2017, 2:35 am

      Curved roof doesn’t necessarily mean less wind resistance. Other THOWs with similar roof designs have proven fairly unstable when towed at high speeds.

      The Micro Lumber Loft by Custom build Surrey, for example, could only be towed up to 40 MPH before it became too unstable to go faster.

      Mind, the long flat sides still leaves the design vulnerable to cross winds and when towing you’re not always going to have all the wind coming at you from one direction.

      But as to the weight, they typically don’t design them with as many layers as we do in the states and they generally don’t stuff them with as much stuff as well…

      For example, look at the counter tops… A typical wood counter top in the states would be 2 1/2 inches to 3 inches thick but you can see in the photo that the one’s they put in are much thinner.

      Similarly, look at the windows and door frame and note how thin they look, as that’s a good indication of how thick the walls are…

      So it’s a pretty thin and light framed structure…

  • Gabriella November 23, 2017, 8:10 am

    Everything is relative, as when some people pay for mortages impossible for conventional housing, and then they are happy out of them, everything is to be seen as in the two sentences of the Socrates philosopher: ” I know only one thing, I do not know anything”; and “There is only one good knowledge and one is evil, ignorance”; and stereotype and prejudice are sons of ignorance.

  • rachel November 23, 2017, 11:32 am

    I love the curved roof and although i love the wood it must add a lot to the weight of the house. Thanks for sharing, namaste’, rachel

    • James D. November 24, 2017, 2:14 am

      Tiny Houses built in European countries are typically very light. Mind, much like we have maximum road size limits before you are required to get a special moving permit, most European countries have a maximum weight restriction of needing to be under something like 3500 kg…

      So they generally don’t build them as densely or as robustly as those made in North America/Canada…

      Australia and New Zealand have similar weight restrictions as well…

      While factors like smaller roads also keeps the maximum dimensions more restricted as well…

      It helps that Europeans are more minimalist in general and there’s generally less extreme temperature and weather to deal with. So there’s usually less put into these that would add weight to it and thus easier to keep the weight low…

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