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This is the story of a family who has been living tiny since they started out together. Today, they’re in a custom built, high-end tiny home on wheels. But thanks to Faircompanies, they share not only their THOW with us, but some of their previous adventures in living tiny. Enjoy!


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This is the PodShare coliving concept in Los Angeles. It’s a membership-based live/work community, kind of like coworkspaces but you can also spend the night here. You get your own bunk bed with charging stations plus access to a shared kitchen and bathroom. The catch? Your bunk has no privacy! But that also means no funny business. PodShare provides toiletries, toothpaste, clean towels, and food. Would you ever consider staying in one of these?

The PodShare Coliving Concept: Membership-based Cohousing

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This is the story of how these 190 sq. ft. tiny rolling hut cabins came to be in an old RV park in Methow Valley.


When Michal Friedrich bought an old farm-turned-RV-park in Washington State’s Methow Valley, he wanted to restore the flood-plane meadow while leaving it open to guests. He called on Seattle architect Tom Kundig, known for his mechanized homes often reliant on archaic pulleys, cranks and levers, to construct alternative mobile cabins (alternative RV park).1

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thanks!

Tiny Rolling Hut Cabins in Washington’s Methow Valley

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This is Truck-a-Float. It’s a floating micro shelter in NYC built using recycled truck caps.

Architects Matteo Pinto and Carolina Cisneros wanted to create a houseboat to live on in the summertime in New York City. The owners of Marina 59 in Far Rockaway, Queens had given them the space to build something (they paid the slip fee). Inspired by the hundreds of used truck caps they saw for sale along the highways of New Jersey and New York, they decided to build a floating home using a cap as a prefab roof complete with windows and screens.1

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thanks!

Floating Micro Cabins Built w/ Recycled Truck Caps

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This is the story of Dan Phillips and his company, Phoenix Commotion.

According to Faircompanies, the company turns unwanted trash into homes, hires unskilled workers, and builds one-of-a-kind homes using salvaged materials for low-income families.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Man Turns Scrap Materials into Whimsical, Affordable Homes

Images via Faircompanies/YouTube

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This is the story of a couple’s off-grid shipping container home.

Before, they used to live in a 4-bedroom home with a pool.

But it costs them so much money, that they wouldn’t have enough money left over for other things they wanted to do.

So the couple decided to build a shipping container tiny home with solar power and water collection systems to live off-grid, debt-free and without utility bills.

This is the story of how they did it. And how just maybe, you can do it too. Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Aussie Couple’s Off-Grid Shipping Container Home

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Images © Faircompanies via YouTube

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You likely have bitter-sweet memories of your days in a college dorm: tight apartment-style places with sub-par amenities.

Take a look at Sweden’s super cool alternative to dorms: tiny cabins. Sweden has a minimum-size requirement, but because so many students were “dorm-less,” they got exceptions to build tiny houses.

From the outside, you’ll see four lime green cabin structures complete with solar panels on the roofs and a white picket fence surrounding the perimeter. Each unit is 110 square feet. In other areas, there are tiny freestanding rectangular cream-colored tiny cabins which are only 93 square feet.

Take a step inside and you’ll encounter a crisp modern interior that includes kitchen, bathroom, living and sleeping spaces for a student. Having all those amenities, even in a tiny space, is a huge plus for students used to sharing those necessities. The cost? About $375/month, or half what it costs to live in other college cities in Sweden.

Sweden using Tiny Cabins as College Dorms

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Images © Faircompanies via YouTube

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