Michael Smith shows us how he’s used straw bale and cob to insulate homes. He’s created a passive solar design using methods that date back all the way to ancient Greeks and Chinese.

During the summer they open up all their windows at night to allow the cool air to come into the house. In the morning they close up the windows and that coolness stays locked inside (thanks to the cob).

During the winter the heat from the sun is absorbed in the clay, straw bale walls and flooring. So this heat is trapped inside the building.

So in the summer the earth material (cob and straw bale) absorbs the cold and traps it inside. During the winter the strategically placed windows allow the sun’s heat to come in, absorb, and get trapped inside throughout the day.

Make any sense? Watch Michael explain it better than me right here…

Video thanks to Faircompanies

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Alex

Alex has been living in small spaces for more than 7 years, he's the founding editor of TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter, and has passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. Send in your story and tiny home photos so we can share and inspire others towards simplicity too. Thank you!

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