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Amazing Tiny Cabins Right on the River in New Hampshire

In this post Deek is going to show you some tiny cabins right on a river in New Hampshire.

They’re called ‘The Pemi Cabins‘ and are on Old Route 3 on Pemigawasset River right by Franconia Notch State Park.

Also- Deek’s upcoming ‘hands on’ tiny house workshop- ‘Tiny House Summer Camp 2‘ is in Orleans, Vermont this August 15-18, 2014.

Tiny Cabins in New Hampshire

Image © RelaxShacks

Image © RelaxShacks

Get the full tour of this little cabin in NH with Deek in the video below:

Video: The Pemi Cabins in NH

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 9 comments… add one }
  • Cosy June 17, 2014, 10:30 pm

    I love these little cabins & the fireplace is a must for the experience. You don’t see many like this anymore. They’ve all been replaced with condos & resorts or just left to ruin. Such a shame. Wish I was closer to go there but I’m too far south. Thanks for sharing these.

  • Dominick Bundy June 18, 2014, 12:04 am

    I would like to see more posts on these old tourists cabins. I remember back in the 1950’s. as a kid. Places such as these were where our family stayed on vacations. Then more and more motels started to replace these old beauties. Now they are far and very few between..I always wanted one placed in my backyard. To get away from loved ones at times.. Oh the memories these little gems have given me. from just one room sleeper to a 2 room cabin fully equiped with a small screened porch.. So sad to see most of them all gone..Hope to hear more about this again.. thanks

  • pat June 18, 2014, 10:42 am

    for livability a murphy bed would be good and, of course cooking facilities. i think old motel conversions are intriguing possibilties for small communal living esp for upcoming tidal wave of elders…

    • Alex June 18, 2014, 10:49 am

      Murphy bed is a great idea and so is the motel conversions. Thanks Pat!

  • Anthony McCarthy June 18, 2014, 12:03 pm

    I’ve seen those from the road, never thought much of them. Same problem with people building that close to a river, watersheds are too important environmentally, to be built on. But the cabin is good, though I’d guess a chimney that size during the worst of winter would be pretty inefficient. Growing up in an old, old farm house, trying to use the fireplaces for heat, it was clear why they’d blocked some of them up and put stove thimbles in the chimneys. Romance will only get you so far when it’s -40F.

    Love Dirk’s videos and blog, s’mores are a waste of chocolate bars and graham crackers. Hate marshmallows, hate ’em.

  • Zackem June 20, 2014, 12:42 pm

    Deek nice little place…! I also think it’s great to have that little fire place, to make some smore’s.. But would you really need to use the heater at night after lighting up the fire place…? I mean, I would think that the fire place would make that nice little cabin really cozy and warm…
    Thanks as always for shearing with us this cozy little place…. Zackem

  • Comet October 10, 2014, 10:31 pm

    There are still lots of these small cabins here in the North East. We stay in one every Bike Week in Lake George New York and pass by these when we go to Bike Week in New Hampshire! A bit too far to ride home from the actual center of Bike Week NH to these on cold often rainy and moose filled roads tho. Maybe another time–we don’t live that far away.

    As to the “Eco Factor”—these cabins were built mostly poast WWII when people began to travel away from home and need small places to stay—not the one color fits all mega rooms we see–at mega PRICES!!!!–today in hotels. Most were built where the tourists were going or on the routes to get there–this place is near many ski and snow trails and near where the Old Man Of The Mountain rock crag was before it cracked. Also on the route up to Canada. I can remember staying at lots of these as a kid.

    IF theya re on riverbanks–well–there are STILL structures being built on riverbanks. I am not defending this–just stating a fact. Most of these North Eastern -New England rivers are not deep wide rivers like the lower Hudson etc–they are more like larger streams. They might rise during snow melt or the occasional hurricane but even during Hurricane Irene lots of these only flooded in certain spots–and NOTHING was like Irene for the past several hundred years!

    Lots of these small cabins and the small motels built in the 40’s-50’s are being turned into small studio apartments—and lots are being preserved AS cabins. Most are owned by the people who run them and who often live on-site. The one we stay in has a huge room with more than enough room for two queen beds. large closet; several dressers; small fridge and microwave. Altho the bathroom is TINY and awkward—But it also is spotless and we have become friends with the owner and the other “Irregulars” who stay there for Bike Week (Americade) and the place costs about HALF what other places do that are not HALF as nice and friendly.

    How much do WE like it? Well—we only live 45 mintues AWAY from here year round–we MUST really REALLY like it!

    And If you took one bed out and added a small compact kitchen and expanded the bath–it COULD function quite nicely as a studio==much bigger than a lot of studios I have been in in NYC!

    No fireplace alas—need to suggest a firepit to the owner!

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