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Modern Prefab Tiny House Assembles Easily but is still Pricey

I normally like to show you examples of tiny houses that are a little more affordable, but other times I still like to show you great examples of small space designs because they’re inspiring.

You can always take these ideas and put them into your very own design and then build it yourself for much less.

But if you do happen to have the extra money, or can even sell off your current assets to downsize, this might be a great option for you since much of the design and labor is already done for you.

So I do imagine that for some folks, this route can still be way worth it, it all just depends right?

I believe this prefab tiny home kit ends up costing upwards of around $65,000 according to Bridget Borgobello over at Gizmag. So let’s take a little virtual tour of it right now.

Prefab Tiny Home called the Housearc

Photo Credits Bellimo Architects & House Arc 

Modular Tiny House the House Arc

It was created by a company called Bike Arc, and they call this one the House Arc because of it’s shape and purpose.

Flat-Pack Tiny House

It’s a modular off-grid housing product intended for tiny house living. At the base are steel tubes for framing that are pre-shaped for you when it arrives to the building site.

Modern Flat-pack Tiny Backyard Home or Fancy Emergency Shelter

The entire package is flat-packed and shipped to you in a 4′ x 10′ x 3′ box and then assembled right there on site.

Modular Tiny House by House Arc

At just 150 square feet it can certainly be considered tiny and there’s a multitude of purposes the shelter can help with, as always. It weighs a total of just 3,000 pounds so it’s relatively light even though it’s made out of steel tubes.

Backyard Accessory Structure called House Arc

Thanks to its shape it should be able to withstand high winds and it can even support several solar panels on the roof to make it self sustainable. The architect? Joseph Bellomo.

Prefab Tiny House

The intention was for the product to be something that can be used for emergency shelters or any other communities in need of affordable housing but also as a backyard accessory structure for current home owners.

 

Interior of Prefab Tiny Home

Below is the Assembly Process for this Flat-Pack Tiny Home

Construction of Tiny Prefab Home

Framing for Prefab Tiny House

Building the House Arc

Putting Together the House Arc

Putting Together the Flat Pack House Arc Tiny Home

Modular House Arc

Prefab Tiny House

FlatPack Modular Tiny Home the House Arc Completed & Fully Assembled

Solar, Wind and Ventilation on the House Arc

Community of House Arcs Prefab Tiny Homes

Photo Credits Bellomo Architects and Bike Arc

As seen recently on Gizmag. Please visit Bellomo Architects and Bike Arc’s House Arc web page for more details.

If you enjoyed this post featuring Bike Arc’s prefab tiny houses, please “Like” and share using the buttons below then share what you liked best in the comments. Thanks!

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 10 comments… add one }
  • LaMar Alexander LaMar June 25, 2012, 8:27 am

    Hmmm… no insulation, partitions or interior design work for $65,000. I like the idea of a prefab small house and this is unique but rounded walls make it difficult to place cabinets and furniture and unless you live in the tropics and a mild climate you are going to want insulation in my opinion. Double sliding glass doors are less secure and less energy efficient.

  • SteveR June 25, 2012, 10:46 am

    Good only for rich people in warm climates. I think a curved roof like that will always be a source of trouble with rain.
    …and it’s just a shell, so perhaps it really is just meant as a shelter.
    Prefab was always touted to reduce costs but it would seem using a custom built wood shelter would still be more affordable. Interesting ideas but not practical.

  • TomLeeM June 25, 2012, 11:29 am

    I can see it as an inspiration for some on to design and build something less expensive and more house like (kitchen, bathroom, bed area, etc).

    I think the shelter from Teal Modular makes more sense for emergency shelter or as a really small house.
    http://www.tealinternational.com/TealCamper/shelters.html

  • Kelly Seminoff June 28, 2012, 12:57 pm

    I think it’s great to see designs that show the range of what’s possible in a tiny format. Expressive and elegant, beautiful lines and materials, great quality of light. Flat packed for efficient shipping. A great solution for the right setting. I think it could meet the ground in a more elegant way, rather than chunky concrete blocks, but that’s minor.

  • sesameB July 2, 2012, 1:22 pm

    Too pricey for me. But still nice. I like it.

  • Otessa Regina Compton August 4, 2014, 10:09 am

    KEEP UP THE EXCELLENT WORK. WE NEED TO GET RID OF SOME APARTMENTS THAT DO NOT GIVE INSPIRATION AND REPLACE THEM WITH HOMES LIKE THESE. REALLY, IF ANYONE WANT TO OWN COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR APARTMENT PROPERTIES, THEY SHOULD RECONSIDER AND REPLACE THEIR CONCEPTS. FOR MOBILITY UPWARD, DOES THAT WANT TO MAKE A PERSON GET OUT THERE A WORK; IF THEY JUST HAD A PLACE TO FEEL MORE OF THEIR OWN.

  • Rebecca August 4, 2014, 10:17 am

    It is pretty. All my life prefab has been touted as the answer to expensive construction but has always pushed costs up up up. Something about distance, shipping, manufacturing costs just doesn’t work.
    I like seeing different things for design ideas and have adapted ideas from both high end and the lowest cost hand made homes. Probably because the far ends seem the most creative. I could adapt the shade screen by cutting plywood arches and using small lumber. It reminds me of airstreams, which are beautiful. A stationary airsteam could have a shade screen like this one.

  • Hank August 4, 2014, 2:55 pm

    The intention was what? “The intention was for the product to be something that can be used for emergency shelters or any other communities in need of affordable housing . . . ” They kind of missed the mark did they not? A bare shell with wasted curved floor space that costs a bundle? As housing? As affordable? What country, what zip code would that be for?

  • Paul August 5, 2014, 8:12 pm

    What country? Why Eedjit of course.

    Zip code: 666911 or where I come from 666111

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