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Artist Turns Garbage into Micro Houses for Homeless in his Area

His name is Gregory Kloehn, an artist in Oakland, California who is building micro houses for homeless people in his area.

In the past I’ve featured one of Kloehn’s earlier creations which was a micro house he built out of a garbage container.

Instead of trying to create art so that rich people will buy it from him now he’s decided to build tiny homes directly for those who need them most.

He dumpster dives until he has enough materials to build a one room shelter for a homeless person.

Artist Builds Mobile Micro Houses for Homeless

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All Images © Gregory Kloehn / Brian J. Reynolds

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Gregory Reclaiming Materials from the Dumpsters

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Almost Ready to Deploy 2 Units

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These Micro Cabins are a Big Deal to People on the Streets

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For Many it’s the Best Home They’ve Had in Years

HOMELESS SHELTER KLOEHN

He Could Be Selling Art to Rich People

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Instead He’s Making the Lives of the Homeless Better

HOMELESS SHELTER KLOEHN

Gregory Builds These Out of Pallets And Other Discarded Wood

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Micro Houses for the Homeless

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Every Single One is Unique

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And They Each Represent Home to a Formerly Homeless Person

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The Pitched Roofs Keep Everything Inside Dry

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Even Windows Are Made out of Recycled Materials

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Isn’t it amazing how this man is using trash to improve people’s lives? Every town could use a guy like this to create micro housing for the homeless in that area.

Next Gregory is out to teach people how to build these magnificent micro homes so that they too can help other homeless people.

You can help too just by spreading the word by sharing this post using the buttons below. Who knows who it may inspire next?

Read the original story at the Huffington Post and ViralNova.

Support this artist at his website here and his Facebook here.

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!
{ 9 comments… add one }
  • Melissa May 7, 2014, 11:08 am

    That settles it. I’ve always wanted to help the homeless! I’ve been pretty close to opening my home to many. I’ve also had a fasination with tiny homes for a very, very long time. What a great way to practice carpentry skills for your own tiny future build than on a home for those that are less fortunate! I’m in! Way- to-go, Gregory!

    • jerryd May 7, 2014, 10:33 pm

      That’s an excellent way to learn Melisa. It’s low cost so mistakes are no big deal. And gives the creative juices a chance to flow.

      Another is helping habitat for humanity, other charity home building, repair orgs is another way to learn. As is helping others though make sure you actually help, not slow things down.

  • Greg Burns May 7, 2014, 1:43 pm

    Being a “homeless” person, myself, I applaud this man’s compassion and genius! I would feel both proud and safe living in one of these little homes! As far as “public perception” goes, some comments have already mentioned the “not in MY backyard” attitudes that often prevail, especially in those, um, “tawnier” towns. In fact, here in Connecticut, the few “homeless shelters” around are usually located RIGHT NEXT DOOR to the Police Departments, um, “just in case…” Our State government recently passed a “Homeless Bill Of Rights” that helps keep those of us stuck on the streets from being “bullied” or “harassed”, especially by law enforcement officers or security guards. However, most people have never even heard of or seen this new law, so we are often forced to carry copies with us to “prove” we are human beings and not terrorists. Thanks for posting this empowering article. Love this web site! 🙂

  • Sally May 8, 2014, 4:08 pm

    Recycling AND creating a home! A wonderful solution to several problems, instead of just talking about it. Love the quirky little houses, what a great imagination. A home is what you make it. I hope there is indeed some legal protection as Greg mentioned. I was reassured we were living in a decent world by an old episode of “What Would You Do?”, where kids (actors) were taunting a homeless person (also an actor). Amazing how differently people reacted when the victim was a male or female. And how it was mostly women in my age group who came to the rescue. Go girls!

    P.S. Way to go, Alec, looks like you’ve stirred up the Facebookers 🙂 The guy who made the crack about dog-houses should spend a few months on the street. He wouldn’t be so snarky without his Facebook.

  • Michael JB May 11, 2014, 8:35 pm

    I would like to see an in depth story about how the local government deals with these people living in these tiny portable houses. Do the police hassle them? Do the police constantly force them to move? Do the police try to chase them out of town? Where do these people park them? How difficult is it to move them? What is the Weight of a big one and can an individual push one without help?

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