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Melinda’s Tiny House Mansion by Tiny Idahomes

This is Melinda’s Tiny House Mansion built by Tiny Idahomes in Idaho.


Melinda chose the builder’s 26′ Clear Creek model and customized the colors and features to her needs. It has two lofts (one for sleeping, one for storage), a large living space, galley kitchen and a bathroom. I loved her storage stairs because they open into a large hanging closet space rather than smaller drawers — clever!

Take a look at the pictures and get additional details and builder contact information below. Enjoy!

Related: French Storyteller Tiny House by Tiny Idahomes

Melinda’s Tiny House Mansion by Tiny Idahomes

Images via Tiny Idahomes

Looking from the living room: Galley kitchen/stairs to loft.

Plenty of room for furniture in the living space.

I like the dark flooring. These are actually vinyl.

Perfect tiny oven and stove for cooking up meals at home.

The loft appears to have decent headroom and light.

Fold-down table/desk area. Great for space-saving.

This is a great-sized fridge. Not too big or too small. Just right.

Look at that hanging storage under the stairs!

More doors allow you to hide things all the way down.


Close up of Melinda’s bedroom. Wish we could see her things 🙂

Perfectly tiny bathroom with good counter space.

She fit a tub and shower combination into her tiny.

I love that the washer/dryer is right next to the clothing storage.

Simple and classy exterior.

Images via Tiny Idahomes

Related: Carpathian Tiny House with Slide Outs by Tiny Idahomes

Details:

  • 2×4 Construction
  • Blown in Fiberglass Batt Insulation – R-15 in walls, R-15 Ceiling and R-13 Floor
  • Board and Batt Siding – painted Behr Porpoise #HGSW3482
  • 3’ Tuff Rib Metal Roofing – Dark Grey Color
  • Jeld Wen windows 1500 series – double pane – single hung – tempered glass
  • 36” Craftsman lite steel front door, painted Behr Wildberry (exterior only)
  • Interior walls and ceiling pine tongue and groove with clear coat finish
  • Floor – one sheet vinyl – IVC Illusions Cortez wood look
  • Rear 10’ loft with dormers, pine tongue and groove floors with clear coat finish, 2 Hampton bay brushed nickel sconces
  • 4” storage loft above front living room
  • Storage stairs – custom built, pine
  • Hampton Bay Luxenberg 36” ceiling fan in brushed nickel
  • Mid Kitchen with double basin Stainless Steel Sink
  • Stainless Steel built in Spray Head Faucet
  • Atwood 17” 3 burner propane RV stove in Stainless Steel with Range hood and fan above
  • Cabinets – Arcadia white shaker style
  • Countertop – Wilsonart, Antique Finish with Aeon “Breccia” Laminate
  • Fold down additional counter space
  • Hampton Bay track lighting in brushed nickel
  • Frigidaire Refrigerator 11.5 cu ft., top freezer, in stainless FFET1222QS
  • Frigidaire Microwave, 1.1 cu ft. in stainless #FFCM1134LS
  • Rear bathroom with porcelain toilet, Bathroom Exhaust Fan
  • 46” x 24”RV Bath Tub Glacier Bay Bath Hardware in brushed nickel
  • Bathroom Vanity with 3 drawer storage, brushed nickel light fixture above
  • 10 Gallon propane dual electric water heater
  • Climate right 10,000 BTU 120 Volt heat pump/air conditioner
  • Holding tanks – 38 gallon grey / 38 gallon back and 50 gallon fresh
  • 30 AMP RV Power Cord and Connection
  • RV Propane Connection with propane cover. Hose Bib water connection
  • Pex Plumbing pipe
  • 3” Sewer Connection

Want a Tiny Idahome? Design your own here!

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.




{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Dana Turner June 3, 2017, 8:24 pm

    I love the storage area under the stairs.

  • keepyourpower June 4, 2017, 1:19 am

    I would put my bed on the first floor and welcome visitors upstairs, to my office/living room. Really like this one.

    Anyone know the price points?

  • Athena June 4, 2017, 11:51 am

    Two things I don’t understand when I see these Tiny Homes:
    1) The huge refrigerators,
    and
    2) Putting the microwaves up high (if you could only see how many burn injuries result from taking hot things out of microwaves placed at face level)…..(!!)

    • James D. June 4, 2017, 7:37 pm

      1) They’re not in every Tiny houses, some do go with really tiny options, but compared to the 4-5 door residential fridges, these are still on the small side… Besides, going tiny doesn’t mean people eat or drink less and not everyone wants to go to the store every few days and would rather space it out to a week or longer, especially if they’re living in a urban area that’s far from anything else…

      Some people also like to cook, so the kitchen can be bigger or smaller depending on the owner and their intended lifestyle… So some people choose not to downsize the fridge…

      Going tiny often deals a lot with what are the real priorities and what does or doesn’t get downsized reflect these choices…

      2) Multiple reasons, the microwave isn’t a high use appliance compared to other cookware and thus is a lower priority for placement.

      Typically, kitchen designs avoid placing anything at counter height to keep that space free for working the kitchen area and cooking. So that leaves above and below, which has to compete with storage and other things like ovens and dishwashers, as well as under counter refrigerators, wine storage, etc. that is traditionally placed in those areas.

      So the industry standard has gravitated to placing the microwave opposite the oven above the cooking range and usually integrated with the over head range vent.

      But if willing to pay for premium kitchen appliances you can get a microwave drawer that can easily fit under the counter…

      • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee June 5, 2017, 3:47 pm

        Yes I lived in an apartment with an apartment-sized under-counter fridge and it drove me nuts, haha. Even though it’s just my husband and I, I cook all our meals and I despise grocery shopping, so going just once a week and packing the fridge full is how I manage 🙂 In that same apartment we had the microwave over the stove. I’m a shortie so I do prefer it on the counter, but when we moved I put it up high again simply so I’d have counter space to cook! (Tiny never allows for much counter space).

        • James D. June 5, 2017, 4:06 pm

          I wouldn’t say never… It does require extra creativity and a willingness to work with multi-usage spaces that you have to convert as needed but it is possible…

          Some people use the stairs, which are sometimes right next to or running right into the kitchen to store the microwave at counter height, for example…

          Some people have fold out or slide out counter tops that allow a doubling to tripling of available counter top space when needed that then folds or slides away when not.

          Making sure to use cookware and other kitchen stuff that can be stacked into each other can considerably allow a better use of space…

          There are what they call appliance garages that let you store appliances out of the way but they can be quickly pulled out when needed… and some of these options include powered systems that use an actuator to have pop up or pop down access to the appliances, as well as to pull out or pull down shelves that may be otherwise out of reach without a step ladder…

          Ovens can have pull out cooling trays built into the counter for added space to place things while swapping what is put into the oven, etc.

          I’ve previously mentioned one multi-purpose appliance that can be built into the counter top as another space saving feature…

          Some have done flip tops where something they use in the kitchen is mounted on one side and you can just flip between them to make more use of space, especially if over what is usually dead space in the corners, etc.

          Cutting boards can be shaped to fit over the sink and cooking range for added counter top space when needed… Etc…

          So I would just say it isn’t easy but not impossible… Just more of a challenge than anything else and not always within a budget or a solution that people may like versus a traditional big kitchen layout…

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