I’m thrilled to announce Jay Shafer’s new venture in the tiny house movement.

As you might know he left Tumbleweed Houses to pursue interests in the same industry.

Jay’s new company is called Four Lights Houses. They are currently a team of four: Shafer and his friends Mark Sowers, Alicia Feltman, and Takeshi Okada.

Much remains the same except hands-on tiny house camp and a tiny house community.

Yes! An official Jay Shafer tiny house village.

But wait, because there’s more. Jay is dedicated to bringing us new tiny house plans on a consistent basis and compact furniture we can use to design our homes the way we want.

Marmara Tiny House Long Shot 1024x1024   Jay Shafer’s Village of Tiny Houses & New Company: Four Lights Houses

Photo Credit Four Lights Houses

Above is an interior photo of the Marmara tiny house that packs more space than any of Jay’s prior tiny homes. Enjoy the rest of this article below:

And of course The Small House Book and The DIY Book are available on his new website.

My favorite part about Jay’s new venture is his pursuit of his first tiny house community named Napoleon Complex: Cohousing for the Antisocial.

The village will be in Northern California and zoned as an RV Park with a density of 16 to 22 homes per acre for a total of 40 to 70 houses.

It will have an 800 to 1600 square foot common house, private gardens, storage units, walkways, parking spaces, and shared outdoor space.

Napoleon Complex is proposed to open in 2015 and as it states on their new website, “Any or all of these ideas might change if we think of something even better.”

napoleon complex cohousing for the antisocial tiny house village community   Jay Shafer’s Village of Tiny Houses & New Company: Four Lights Houses

Photo Credit Four Lights Tiny Houses

To sign up for email updates from Jay and his team visit FourLightsHouses.com.

If you haven’t already joined our free tiny house newsletter do so here.

If you enjoyed this post and are as excited as I am about it, “Like” and share it using the buttons below then share your thoughts in the comments at the bottom. How excited would you be if communities like this were being planned in your area? 

Share ==>facebook   Jay Shafer’s Village of Tiny Houses & New Company: Four Lights Housestwitter   Jay Shafer’s Village of Tiny Houses & New Company: Four Lights Housesemail   Jay Shafer’s Village of Tiny Houses & New Company: Four Lights Houses
The following two tabs change content below.
   Jay Shafer’s Village of Tiny Houses & New Company: Four Lights Houses

Alex

Alex has been living in small spaces for more than 7 years, he's the founding editor of TinyHouseTalk.com, and has passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. Send in your story and tiny home photos so we can share and inspire others towards simplicity.

Facebook Comments

comments


{ 111 comments }

  • brian

    Did not know Jay was or had roots in Sonoma County. My home town. Pretty cool.

    Reply
  • NGD

    Great news

    Reply
  • Ruth R.

    Exciting! This would answer the question of where do you park one, after you build a tiny house…that has often been a quandry for people, as I understand it.
    Thanks for sharing Alex!

    Reply
  • Kelley Chambers

    OMG, he DID IT!!!! I’m so incredibly jazzed!!! Plus, it’s in my favorite area of the US… gosh, my dream factor just got bumped up about 15 notches!!! :)

    Reply
    • Alex

      So glad to hear you’re jazzed about it Kelley!! :)

      Reply
  • Dixie Hacker Hurley

    what a great idea, every community should have then as far As I’m concearned, sounds like a neat little community, not too crowded, not to empty. Enough privacy, but near enough to revive help in an emergency, an a chance for everyone who lives there to be a good neighbor to each other without anyone’s private space being over run ! What a better deal could one get ?

    thanks , Dixie Hacker Hurley.

    Reply
  • Joyce Henderson

    Love you’re idea, though not the anti-social part. Have you given any thought about building a community for retirees who want to down size big time from all the work keeping up a big home requires. I would sell my home immediately to live in one.

    Reply
    • Alex

      What a wonderful idea Joyce, thanks for sharing. In Florida there are numerous communities like this using Park Models. I’d love to see something similar, too, but with Jay’s style.

      On a side note I think when he says antisocial it’s relative to cohousing where you have to share a home with others.

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Hi Joyce. I’m thinking about making the community in pods with a “family” pod here and a “retiree” over there. Post like yours only encourage me.

      Reply
      • Sue McGuire

        Jay,I LOVE the idea. Just leave plenty of room for future expansions. I hope to be living in a tiny house within 12-18 months but can’t retire from my present job and move to your community for another 7.5 years!

        Reply
        • Jay Shafer

          I plan to leave room for an additional room on both sides of each. Are you a mind-reader or what?

          Reply
    • Lindsay Sommers

      Love this concept. We need more ideas like this. Retiring. Don’t want large, want sustainable, community based less expensive. Keep going

      Reply
  • Tonita

    Hmmm, I wonder if there will be a tiny home owners association to make “rules” about pets, keeping the exterior and common areas clean and so forth? Good idea for those who like a sense of community but with that concept, I see rules and regulations that will govern that kind of set up.

    Reply
    • Alex

      Good call Tonita. I think they’ll have rules just not sure how they plan on structuring. Maybe as a co-op or HOA. Either way I agree with having rules to ensure everyone is happy and standards are met and maintained. What do you all think?

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Yes. There will have to be some sort agreement between folks wanting to live there about what living there will be like.

      Reply
      • Shelly Little Feather

        I have been living in a mobile home community for a year now. There is no reason there should be a problem setting up guidelines for this community,especially since there will be like minded folks wanting to live there. I think it’s awesome. Hopefully they will be able to have monthly meetings and get input and ideas from the community. Our senior snowbirds do that and it works really well.

        Reply
  • Cheri

    I just can’t see that living on top of one another (16 – 22 home per acre) can possibly be labeled for the antisocial! This is tiny house suburbia!! It’s everything I hate that made me start looking into tiny houses to start with. I looks like suburban hell to me. So disappointed that this is the direction Jay is going.
    Very sad :(

    Reply
    • Alex

      I never thought of it that way. I’d be happy with it because it’s less land to maintain and it’s a big improvement from sharing walls in an apartment like I do now.

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      You’re right, Cheri. This wouldn’t be for everyone any more than a tiny house is. But don’t be too disappointed. I’m multi-directional on the tiny house front, and I’ll continue making little houses that stand on their own in more rural settings (probably even more so).

      Reply
      • Cheri

        Thanks for clearing that up Jay. I am so passionate about living small. Everything that I am doing in my life right now is in preparation for small living. I am so excited about living within my means as I am completely debt free now and never want to be in debt again. Not even house debt. I also want to be involved in the process of building it! Your books have united a flame in me that will not go out! I so dislike suburban life so when I saw the picture it freaked me out! Thanks for your contribution in this whole tiny house movement. It has given me hope of a home I can call my own without being in debt! :)

        Reply
        • Mary

          Cheri, it surprised me when I saw how close the houses would be to each other too. I won’t be living in CA, so it was just momentary shock for me. I cringe whenever I see houses that all look the same and are stacked on top of one another. But everyone is different and there will be people who enjoy this option, just as there will be others who prefer a bit more land.

          One thing I have trouble keeping in perspective is that a .1 acre lot (just as a for instance, not the size of Jay’s) is tiny for a big house, but for a tiny house, it might seem pretty big. When you decrease the square footage of the house, you automatically increase the square footage of the yard. Also, for retirees especially, a smaller yard would be better-not as much to mow. Another simplification of life in at least some people’s views.

          Reply
    • MaryJ

      This doesn’t look so bad to me – I’m sure there are plenty of people who want the opportunity to live small and maybe one good reason would be affordability while retaining accessibility to what their local world has to offer.

      If I’m ever so fortunate to own a little house I will still want community with neighbours, seeing house lights at night and hearing and contributing to the noises of everyday human interaction.

      Reply
  • Kathy R

    Perhaps this will start a trend with a variety of neighborhood types: some like this, plus some more rural, isolated alternatives for those who would like more privacy. Maybe even a gated tiny house development! Who knows?

    Reply
    • Alex

      I think it will do just that Kathy, another reason I find it so exciting. Thanks!

      Reply
  • Roland

    This is a good idea for individuals (or couples) looking to simplify and own their living space – but stay close to town ( I assume) in order to be less car dependent. It would be great to exploit as much green technology as possible. I wonder if a community like this could be sustainable off the grid?
    Exciting concept IMO.

    Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Those two concepts are exactly what I’ve been thinking about for the past decade, Roland. What are you, a mind reader. The first village will probably be some sort of infill that’ll require less driving than other forms. I’d love to do a tiny town in the country, too… once I figure out how to work in some sort of decent grocery store and off-grid utilities. But that’s another hurdle.

      Reply
      • Myrrhlynn

        Jay, you might consider a co-op for groceries. Our local food co-op started out in the 70s as a buying club that ordered through an established food cooperative in the next state, the closest one at the time. It is now associated with several others here in the Midwest. Check this out for some ideas: http://strongertogether.coop/

        Reply
    • Alex

      I’m sure that can be achieved with solar panels, rainwater collection and the use of composting toilets. But just with it being smaller homes makes it less energy dependent which is awesome. Thanks for your enthusiasm Roland!

      Reply
  • alice h

    My ideal of a tiny community like this would be kind of like circles of density radiating back from the communal buildings and main access. Closest would be densest, then buildings thin out as you get further back. You can still be part of a community but have more privacy if that’s what you like best. It’s most economical to have more density though when accessing the utilities and less road/path maintenance etc.

    Reply
    • Alex

      Interesting idea, Alice, never thought of it like that.. thanks for sharing!

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      My thought, exactly, Alice. If I’m ever going to convince my wife to live there, I’ll have to establish some relatively isolated housing in the outer ring. I don’t know if that’ll be possible in the first village, but I agree that it is ideal.

      Reply
    • rich

      I would caution everyone to look at what has gone before and to NOT get too hung up on “style” or shape or organizational patterns. First consideration (to my mind) would be to plan with the land (and to allow for maximum access to the sun. Case in point: An intentional community I considered a couple years back was begun with an efficient civil engineer’s plan; a 300′ diameter circle of lots surrounding a future community house and gardens. 3 2-story “energy efficient” boxes had been built by a local contractor altho self design/build was encouraged. Lots are leased. I began to design a house on two of the available pie-shaped lots, quickly discovering that the build-able area required going vertical; that each successive house would shade the next on the south half of the circle and that the narrowest face of the lots on the north half of the circle faced the sun.
      Many intentional communities have been planned, built or failed. Some of the most successful seem to be in Scandinavia and Wales (http://www.lammas.org.uk/) I’m sure that Jay is doing his homework and I am pleased to see that he is moving forward from the tiny house model.

      Reply
  • Mark Burton (Tiny House UK)

    Fantastic! From the UK point of view, an awsome idea waiting to happen also in the UK. The younger generation have little or no hope of getting on the property ladder so a Tiny House village would be a great start. The new modern form of “Starter Home”, live cheap and SAVE money. The UK farmers have found it tough for many many years. The “Big Four” supermarket chains have taken over and most farms are struggling to make ends meet. Most farmers have acres and acres of green belt that could be put to use with a fresh look at land use. Can you see where I am going with this?

    Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Sounds all too familiar, Mark, and resolvable once our zoning officials and yours see the light.

      Reply
      • Alex

        Jay, thank you so much for your feedback.

        Reply
  • Liz

    The beauty of tiny houses is that you can make it however you like. Twenty-two units on on acre is NOT suburban, it’s high-density and a great land use. Don’t like it? Don’t buy one.

    “Criticize by creating!”

    Reply
    • Cheri

      I suppose everything that enticed me about tiny house living is not the same as what entices others. I have every intention of “creating” the living environment that fits my lifestyle. The definition of “great land use” remains to be seen. I actually won’t buy one I’ll be building my own.

      Reply
  • Carolyn B

    I’m not dissing this plan as I love the idea of a tiny home village but in less urban areas it will be more attractive to have one’s car next to the house in case of inclement weather, large packages, or advanced age/disability. Yes, I know inclement weather never happens in CA. :)
    I’m excited to see this prototype so that someday I may get to live in a tiny house community while catering to my own special needs at home.

    Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Every time I draw up a dream plan for this place, I grapple with the balance between convenient parking and efficient land use. With your encouragement, Carolyn, I’m going to lean a bit closer to the former in my next drawing. I know I can get both.

      Reply
      • Ramona

        Congrats Jay! Your new business venture looks awesome!

        I am so excited about the Tiny House Community. I am just curious why the size limits don’t include houses under 270 square feet. Could you explain?

        Thanks & best of luck!
        Ramona

        Reply
    • Garth

      Like the others here, I find the idea very exciting! From something said on another page or video some time back though, I too have been thinking I would want to park right next to the house, partly for reasons Carolyn B gives, but I’ve also had an alternator go out for example, and had to run a cord out to the car to charge the battery at night until I could get the car fixed a few days later.

      The part about actually owning the tiny piece of property the tiny house is on, and not having to always be dodging ordinances, and being able to be mobile as well if you like, are wonderful!

      Reply
  • shirley

    Thanks, this is an excellent post.

    Reply
  • Nick

    Though I’ve always been into the grandeur of buildings and architecture, I have found this to be a resonation with me that I cannot perpetuate emotionally. My life, my book purchases, and my possessions now revolve around minimalist and small houses, with eco-power and the such. Between UCLA studies…I’m searching for new background photos and dreaming…uh..big and small simultaneously!

    Growing up in Indiana, I had the privilege of going to my Grandfather’s hand-built lake cottage and watching the other ones spring up next to us like monstrosities. I always thought our little cottage was the best and its size and simplicity did not take away from the majesty of the lake. Traveling in the Navy and Hawaii, I saw that the beauty of experience trumps stuff, and the surrounding beauty of nature makes for a home more than the home itself. So this was a perfect convergence, and I know that my life will be smaller and more real, the way we used to live…the way my Grandfather and his wife and SEVEN kids used to live…all Summer long…wow things have changed. And the bill is due for us. Coming out of the Navy, owning property and land where I want to live is a joke…

    Sonoma sounds wonderful, and everyone down here says I’m more of a NorCAL kinda guy anyway…so please, let me know…because IF I can use that VA Loan, or even just save some of my GI Bill…then Napoleon sounds amazing. Sorry for the volumes of reply…I am just excited! Thanks again for helping me find my life…

    Reply
    • Alex

      Thanks for sharing Nick. Your thoughts are inspiring and I’m glad you’re excited.

      Reply
  • alice h

    As for transportation in the village itself, why not have communal use golf cart type things? You can even have a sort of bus/taxi system where people take turns being “on call” to run people and stuff back and forth or have a regularly scheduled freight run. Some of the senior homes in our area run a small bus that takes residents to shopping areas or wherever, could have a community vehicle to do that for those that don’t want to own a private vehicle.

    Reply
    • Alex

      Great idea Alice. You can also have those large plastic wheel barrels that are used where folks live on boat docks to bring their groceries, etc into their boats. But a community golf cart would be another great addition. Thanks!

      Reply
    • Mary

      That’s what I was thinking, too, Alice. The golf carts would be greener and would promote a more self sustained, simple life, while the parking further away would still allow the freedom that comes with owning a car when needed.

      Reply
  • Amanda

    Wow! Wow! Wow! You’ve taken the tiny house movement, again, to another level. So many possibilities. I bet it’s hard to turn off your brains at night. Thank you guys for your inspiration. Can’t wait for updates. Love the idea of the solar panels. I’m right next door in Napa county. I started building my “first” tiny house in September. My own dream come true. If you need any help, I would mop floors, take out the trash, do the dishes, anything to be involved.

    Reply
    • Alex

      Thanks Amanda and congratulations on starting your first tiny house! Keep us updated please!

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      I need to meet you, Amanda. Anyone willing to do my dishes is welcome in my tiny world.

      I do have trouble sleeping lately. That is exactly why I sit here in my tiny house, writing you and all these other folks ay 3:22 in the morning.

      I’ve gotta’ see your house. I am just one county over. I Emotocon tiny houses.

      Reply
  • Daniel

    What would blend well with a tiny house community is permaculture. Its application could: decrease the need for outside goods, design the structure of the house community, and help create community guidelines.

    Reply
  • Elaine Sorrell

    This reminds me of the old complexes in California, with small cottages and a common area. What a great idea, hope this takes off and spreads across the country.Love the idea of a separate parking area.

    Reply
    • Alex

      Thanks Elaine!

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      ‘Love those bungalow courts of So. Cali., Elaine. They inspired Ross Chapin, and Ross’s community ideas inspired me. The legacy continues.

      Reply
  • Cindy

    I have been a follower for so long (never made any comments), been renting in the bay area/peninsula. This is heaven. To live with no debt, simplistic, (hey I do have my fancy things too) but WOW, and to have close neighbors to be pals (if you want), keep an eye on you, watch your house while you are out………. Jay–Can I buy a parcel NOW? :))))))) I may be 52, but still healthy, feel like a 40 yr old, and will work at my job as long as I can- a commute down towards the city a few days a week.
    YOU ARE A GOD!
    and I have to laugh– no “11″ on the music! no barking all night,
    (my cat snores LOL)
    I’ll be SO on top of this!

    Reply
    • Alex

      I love your enthusiasm Cindy thank you so much!

      Reply
  • Cindy

    What I forgot to mention (when I mentioning my age, health etc) these homes/shells are so wonderful- I can climb into a loft, and as I get older if somehow I can’t climb with ease-I can sleep on the main level if I design it that way.
    This entire concept is perfect!!!
    Design your home for your lifestyle!
    Live your life as you dream!
    Share your life with people that have so much in common!

    Reply
    • Liz

      I’d like to clear something up, Alex. Living in cohousing does not mean you share a home, any more than in any condo. So they can be separate or attached or anything, but I own my home separately. What Jay is proposing differs from cohousing only in that it is being developed by a company and not a group of people who will live there.

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Godlike, indeed. I get that a lot, Cindy.

      Reply
  • Kathy Handyside

    I didn’t know Jay left Tumbleweed! What will happen to all those wonderful house plans? I sure hope they don’t disappear because I like the Fencl and the Walden.

    Love the idea of a tiny village. We need more of these across the entire nation.

    Reply
    • Alex

      Hi Kathy, no worries, Tumbleweed and all the work Jay has done there still remains. Thanks!

      Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      It’s true. Tumbleweed still has some of the best tiny house plans around. I spent a lot of time on those. They are what informed my current work. I love those houses.

      Reply
  • Raymond

    Sounds like the logical next step to tiny house living. Will there be any accommodations for pets? I had been hoping to own a few chickens and/or rabbits.

    Reply
  • Tiny Houses Hankerings

    This is so awesome! When I saw the article headline my first thought was “please let it be somewhere warm”. I’m stuck here in MN where its freezing and knee deep in snow. I’m looking for somewhere warm to move and have my own tiny house. I love this idea because I don’t want to be out in the woods by myself, as a single older woman I want the safety of being surrounded by community and other like-minded people. Just like trailer parks – these need to be everywhere. LOVE IT!! THANK YOU JAY!!

    Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Joan, almost anything outside of MN seems warm to me.
      I think you’d agree that, while we do see seasons here (it’s 26 degrees outside now), Sonoma County is quite a relative tropical paradise. Come! Be! Enjoy! But if you don’t love great wine, crappy (but enjoyably challenging) surf and the best geography on earth, don’t come. You’d hate it.

      Reply
      • Allison

        Jay?! Is there any new info on this dreamily efficient project?! We are trying to get out of Alaska and are ready to build our tiny house, but have no where to plant it. Winter is horrible here and we need out!!! Your village sounds just right for us, but I can’t seem to find any new information. Is it really going to happen? Even if we have to wait till 2015, at least there could be Four Lights at the end of this long wintry tunnel!!

        Reply
    • Kim

      I am in the cold Northern Midwest, too. Will have to plan for this, too. Should be more than ready by 2015. I’ll pick you up on the way through MN, Joan!

      Reply
  • frankie

    I am really happy to see your new website and that you are continuing and expanding the tiny house project. We need more tiny house communities.
    I am planning to build my own house and would LOVE to go to your workshop BUT I don’t have $1200. After selling everything I own and moving from WA to AZ, I am living with my mother temporarily. My motivation for living in a tiny house is the affordability. Since I only make $700 a month I figured it was a good solution. Well, I’ve watched enough Bob Vila episodes that I am confident I can do it myself. I might make some mistakes along the way but that is all part of learning I guess.

    Reply
  • frankie

    I had another thought of a co-op community where residents buy in and all the homeowners help to build all the houses. This would cut down labor costs to zero and several homes could be built in one day.

    Reply
    • Jay Shafer

      Frankie, You are on it… and so am I. I’m currently working on that idea. Brilliant minds…
      Jay

      Reply
  • tom merle

    You’ve probably already done so, but check out Wine Country RV Park up the road from you in Rohnert Park. It’s two parks in one. One for travelers, one for more permanent residents whose “RVs” are quite run down, but it does provide affordable housing apparently. And it already has a common social building. The owners might be open to alternative ideas as would city and county staff. And it is right next to Sonoma State U.

    As you are probably finding out the hook up fees when starting afresh are quite costly.

    Here’s the Google map https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=7450+Cristobal+Way,+Rohnert+Park,+CA+94928&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=45.149289,76.728516&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=7450+Cristobal+Way,+Rohnert+Park,+Sonoma,+California+94928&view=map

    Reply
  • alice h

    Though not specifically about tiny housing there’s a project on a nearby island that may have some interesting ideas to poach. http://galianoaffordablehousing.org/thesociety/

    Reply
  • Barb Blythe

    WOWEE! I have been waiting for this! The ball is rolling! I want to build a tiny house so bad but cannot find a DECENT place to park it so I haven’t started yet…Things are definitely looking up. Now all I have to do is convince family to leave the midwest for northern CA! (ha). Jay, don’t forget to leave space for a community garden or small indiv plots–you have such awesome ideas! Will be waiting for future postings. YEA!

    Reply
  • Susan C

    What a great idea! I have looked at the tiny houses for several years on the web but did not consider actually owning one because of the problwm with parking it. As a soon to be retiree, I would love the idea of living in a tiny house, on tiny property (less to keep up), but with neighbors nearby. I would feel less alone than trying to buy a piece of property out in the middle of nowhere where the restrictions are less.

    Reply
  • jean

    The only problem I see is someone is is older or has a leg handicap will have trouble walking so far from the parking area and when it;s raining???and groceries

    Reply
  • Edie LeBrun

    Although I am still in my “big” house, I am in the prep stages of becoming a tiny house owner. I fell in love with the idea of a tiny house village when I saw the work of architect, Ross Chapin. These villages are reminiscent of the neighborhoods in the 40′s during the war. (Think Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russel in Swing Shift) Tiny houses are slow to catch on here on the East Coast, but are growing in popularity. I would love to start my own “village” here. Keep up the good work, Jay!

    Reply
  • Otessa Regina Compton

    I am in love with this concept. Jay should also come up with some houses for seniors, bed first level, and some homes for those with disabilities. I completely congratulate Jay for this concept. We should all have a toast for this, can wish Jay more power to the success of this. Now all we have to do, is campaign against taxes, so that we can keep Jay’s ideas coming. Love Ya Jay!!!

    Reply
  • markus pikounis

    Hi, im in long island new york, the price of affordable housing no longer exists here, i believe this area would be a goldmine for a start up business, any advise would be greatly appreciated. mark

    Reply
    • Kevin

      Hi Marcus,
      I’m in LI also and agree this is likely the most challenging area for a Tiny House Community but I’m hopeful. Jay I love the community aspect of this plan and would love take it a step forward and include sewer access and maybe a home owners association and amenities center like most subdivisions have. Love the idea of small living in a community setting thanks for your work

      Reply
      • Lexi

        We are house hunting right now on LI and the prices for what you get are frustrating. Everything in our range (even small) need major renovation where we want to live. If we find what we want the taxes are completely out of range.

        Reply
  • bj

    Would love to live in a community like this. I’ve been talking about this kind of living for over a couple of years after seeing it in my dreams and then sharing it with my friends. Love this home for 29K … need to have bed on the ground floor however. Is anyone building these structures in San Jose, California?

    Reply
    • angie

      Check this website” So Cal cottages” they have very cute tiny homes

      Reply
  • dean

    I am in the market for a log cabin style tiny house shell on wheels that I can convert into a mobile kitchen. I cannot go more than ten feet in length and eight feet wide so one with a loft feature for storage would be a plus. I live in new york and the unit needs to comply with new yorks mobile vending guidelines. Can someone please hekp?

    Reply
  • Mary

    Where in Northern California is this going to be?

    Reply
    • Alex

      Hi Mary I believe somewhere North/near Sebastapol but not sure. Thanks for asking!

      Reply
  • Joanie

    Own an acre of land on the big island of Hawaii in Hawaiian Paradise Park. Would love to have a tiny house built on it. Land needs to be cleared. Any ideas on the best way, resources, to do this?

    Reply
  • JackieRuth Koson

    Jay,
    I am still living, breathing and touching the tiny movement, but as you know from your 77th Facebook friend that I had changes incur in my life when I went from my Tiny J copy and sprouted out in to more or less, a compound of small dwellings on my five acre parcel in the forest. I have often dreamt and have even openly shared that as our conditions change in our Country and as we see many Americans falling in to third world conditions, I have had a dream to make Tiny house communities for the homeless, but not for those who don’t want to work, but for those who would be willing to work for others helping others to get on their feet by helping to build tiny houses for others whom are what they were which is homeless and hungry in America where our poverty would be deemed as wealth in comparison to poverty found in true third world countries which I unfortunately, see many American’s falling victim to. My dream would be similar to the Habitat for Humanity homes where we help others by helping others and who knows? Perhaps some lucrative jobs could be created along the way, but first, we must get the land and find this land available in places that do not have zoning laws and regulations so we would not have to worry about the red tape. Jay, as you know, I have been a fan of yours from the beginning when I fell in to a new movement before I even knew that it was a new movement. I have a very early J copy if not, the first J copy that I towed behind my truck from the Florida Keys to land in the forest that had no restrictions! That turned out to be the smartest thing that I have ever done in my life and it was a beautiful “MOM” retreat until we fell victim to one of those South Florida V. A. Govt loan Fraud houses prompting me to move my family to my little enchanted forest which started with a Tiny House that I named the Hobbit House and the sign for the Hobbit House was painted by a man who was dying on his death bed giving that Hobbit House sign that much more meaning and as my needs changed and I went from “off grid” to “on grid” living, I turned an old portable building in to a cabin that was repossessed and started to add other buildings that were self designed and inspired creating what is now affectionately known as Hobbit Village in Hobbit land in Hobbit World but my idea is that although the names seem crazy, the ideas that I have behind the names could become a reality that could help so many. I no longer have the physical health to do the work, but the ideas are still there and although, you have been working on this idea for awhile, I am excited to see you taking off with something that once again strikes my own keen interest! Can we broaden that idea using the Napoleon complex in to something that could help people who are quickly falling in to third world conditions here in America? Tiny houses could be built for one person or for a couple to give them a chance to recharge and they can pay it forward to help build for others. Just thoughts from a Hobbit from Hobbit Village in Hobbit land discussing possibilities to further help others in a Hobbit World! A Tiny person with big ideas!

    Reply
  • Linda Mason

    I’d love to network with others on this site who’d like some land to build their tiny home. My property is in central N.Carolina, near the mountains
    but close to Winston-Salem, NC. It’s 20 acres of wooded, beautiful and private land. Quiet too!
    Where would you suggest I could network?
    There’s lots of possibilities here for several homes, as well as an existing
    renovated farmhouse (with wood heat).
    Thanks!
    Linda 336 591-5413

    Reply
  • Astrid

    Sweet Fancy Moses!!!
    Are there any updates on this project? I’ve been following it for a while, checking out the page on Four Lights. I even emailed just to make sure it’s real, or actually going to happen. (They nicely replied back, that they will add updates on the page when they have them.) So I figure, it’s almost 2014, and if it has an opening date of 2015, there should be some new information.

    We’ve been dreaming about our tiny house for a good while now, even talked to builders, narrowing down plans, but the fact remains there is no clear cut place to plant ourselves. We live in Alaska, and are chomping at the bit to move and build our tiny home. (Alaska is not tiny home friendly, there is an adventurous girl and her dogs who have one outside of town and she is having so many problems with the hideous winter weather and keeping her house Alaskan weather proof.)

    Eventually we will be buying land somewhere to settle. But I’d much rather have somewhere secure to plant us at first, and then when we are ready to buy land go for it then. (Looking at land on the internet is not the same as visiting!! Round-trips are shamefully expensive in and out of AK.)

    Is this really going to happen? I need a light at the end of the tunnel!! Maybe Four Lights? Hellllp!!!

    Reply
  • Ron

    I’ve tried two email addresses, but your confirmation doesn’t show up. You can send me the newsletter to part3bestme@hotmail.com.
    Thanks

    Reply
  • angie

    Hi Cindy:
    I also in the peninsula and work in SF- what about we start a group
    and try to put a tiny house community of our own? I am sure there are lits of us in the SF Bay area will be interested in this community.

    angie

    Reply
  • angie

    Bj, we might have to build our own in San Jose with Jay’s guidance and advice. I am in!
    Angie

    Reply
  • Julie Caldwell

    I love all of these comments and input! I’ve expressed interest in Jay’s village before, but I don’t think I’ve received any updates . . . (?). Jay, you write that your ideas keeping growing and morphing. If you have a target date of 2015, when does the morph stop and the build begin? (Or is it designed so that it can keep morphing during and after it’s built?) Ramble notes about me: I’ve been interested in tiny homes since before there was a movement (my dream at age 10 was a “garret” or a shed for writing). I’m now 54 and looking to go back to school (after 15 years at a job). I live on Long Island but I’m not married to it! I’m selling my “big” house to NY State under one of the Superstorm Sandy acquisition programs, so I’m at quite a crossroads in my life. I so dearly want to do a tiny house, preferably on a trailer. I’d love to be able to build it with other people as I do not have the confidence in my understanding of the physics of building but am willing to put in the sweat equity (also have design ideas). I may end up having to buy a smaller house in the meantime (I have a big dog and two little dogs — the big dog removes an apartment as an option). My daughter lives in San Diego . . . My HEART says do the tiny house NOW but where do I do it? I don’t see it happening on Long Island anytime soon. — Just needed to reach out to other tiny house folks. . .

    Reply
  • Ramona

    Hi Julie, I live on LI as well. I rented for over 10 years with a 90lb Chow/Akita Mix and 3 cats. I lived in 4 different cottages with them. 3 in East Northport and 1 in Eatons Neck on a 6 acre piece of property. If you rent a small cottage or house you will be able to find a rental that allows pets. Good luck!

    Reply
  • Linda

    This may end up being the only solution to finding a place to park your butt..er, tiny home, what with all the city rules and regulations these days. The other solution would be to park it like a hunting cabin way out in the boonies.

    Reply

Leave a Comment