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“Coming Home”: A Tiny House Fiction Book for Tiny House Living Fans

Fiction can transport us into new worlds and inspire us to follow new dreams. I think that’s exactly what might happen when you read “Coming Home: A Tiny House Collection.”


This book is a collaborative effort by seven authors who each wrote a story about a character living in a tiny house. You can read a tiny blurb about the plot of each story, and then an italicized “from the author” about their inspiration for their stories below.

Want to get the book? Head over to Amazon. It’s available in Paperback and Kindle.

Related: “The Big Adventures of Tiny House” Children’s Book

“Coming Home”: Tiny House Fiction for Tiny Living Fans

Photo via Amazon

Related: Joshua Woodsman’s “How To Build A Tiny House” Book

The Authors, The Stories, The Inspiration: 

First Love, by Yvonne Anderson
“Betrayed by her husband and desperate for healing, she can only move forward by going back home.”

When I lived [in Ohio], I used to fantasize about building a little house at the top of the hill at the back of the property. What a perfect place to put a tiny house! So I came up with a scenario about a woman who did just that. I changed the place names a little, but anyone who knows the area will recognize it. Once I got started, the story was fun to write. It was like a trip back home.

Big Love, by Michael Ehret
“Homelessness expanded her world and constricted his. Now she needs his help, but he only remembers the pain. Can they find big love in a tiny house?”

What if? What if the man in the story was a writer for an architectural journal who thought himself too sophisticated to do a story on tiny houses? What if the woman was the president of a company building tiny houses with the idea to use the proceeds to battle homelessness (and who also provides tiny houses, at cost, to those who need a place to live off the streets)? Then, what if both of these people had experienced homelessness in different forms and it had drastically affected their lives, but it different, opposite ways?


Dash of Pepper, by Kimberli S. McKay
“His responsibilities tie him to the small town he loves, but her career plans will lead her to the big city. Will he cut his roots for her or will she clip her wings for him?”

If These Walls Could Talk, by Pamela S. Meyers
“Both claim to have inherited the same Queen Anne until an unexpected blessing changes everything.”

I had wanted to write a story set on Madeline Island, which is part of the Apostle Islands off the coast of Wisconsin in Lake Superior, for a long while. I already had a storyline in mind and including a tiny house in the story fit like it belonged there. Two people both believe they inherited the same Queen Anne house. He is living in a tiny house parked next to the Queen Anne while he rehabs the big house and she wants him to leave her house, but wouldn’t mind if he left his cute tiny house for her.

Love is Sweeter in Sugar Hill, by Ane Mulligan
“She has a tiny house. He lives in a mansion. She vows to charge a doctor with malpractice. His job depends on that doctor’s finances. Can two hearts see beyond the chasm that separates them?”

The Light Holding Her, by Chandra Lynn Smith
“Friends since childhood. She’s being stalked. He’s in danger. Is their faith big enough to carry them through the trials into a deeper relationship?”

After we decided on our tiny house concept, I searched tiny house websites and found one I loved that could be built on stilts in the forest, making it a tiny tree house. Thus my story’s house was elevated on poles, not attached to the trees. We have a tiny house at our pool my husband built from scratch and as I began writing my story I would sit inside the pool house and envision living in it.

Kayla’s Challenge, by Linda W. Yezak
“She was one “I do” short of marrying the man her pushy parents chose for her. Now, half a country away, she needs a tiny house to finally be free.”

Kayla leaves her home state and heads west with her brother’s horse and trailer and a loosely drawn plan. In Kayla’s Challenge, plans go awry when she discovers the cost of living in the Texas hill country, but the best answer to her busted budget is an adorable, 400-square-foot Tudor home.

Related: Robert’s DIY Tiny Shepherd’s Hut and “How To” Book

Resources: 

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.




{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Michael Ehret May 20, 2017, 12:23 pm

    Thanks for sharing about our book! We’ve all been intrigued by the tiny house phenom. The stories were a fun way to be involved!

  • Linda Yezak May 20, 2017, 12:37 pm

    So excited to see our book on your site! Also excited to see an ad from Texas A&M, my alma mater. This is now one of my new favorite blogs!

  • Ane Mulligan May 20, 2017, 3:08 pm

    Thanks, Tiny House Newsletter for the promotion! I’ve long been fascinated by tiny houses and have been watching the shows on HGVT and DIY for several years. One of the authors in the book has decided with her husband to build one in the NC mountains as a weekend getaway. I hope one day to have one, too!

  • Chandra Lynn Smith May 28, 2017, 7:24 pm

    I am a debut author, so each time I see my book mentioned it gives me a thrill! It was particularly exciting to see it on this website. Writing this book has made me want to spend more time relaxing in our tiny pool house.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee May 29, 2017, 2:25 pm

      Thanks so much for writing! It can inspire others 🙂

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