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Charles Finn’s Micro Cabin Built with Reclaimed Materials

This is Charles Finn’s micro cabin that he built using reclaimed materials.

It’s an 8′ x 12′ structure with a 5 foot loft called the Potomatic Cabin. It’s even been featured in Lloyd Kahn’s Tiny Homes, Simple Shelter book.

Finn is now building more tiny cabins using reclaimed materials. In fact, he’s built several of them to date. Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Charles Finn’s Micro Cabin Built with Reclaimed Materials

8x12 Potomatic Cabin by Charles Finn 001

Images © Charles Finn

8x12 Potomatic Cabin by Charles Finn 002

8x12 Potomatic Cabin by Charles Finn 003

8x12 Potomatic Cabin by Charles Finn 004

8x12 Potomatic Cabin by Charles Finn 005

Images © Charles Finn

Learn more: http://finncharles.wix.com/a-room-of-ones-own

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 28 comments… add one }
  • Mike October 22, 2015, 7:14 pm

    Cool little DIY place.

  • Liz October 22, 2015, 7:35 pm

    Love it! So cozy and inviting with the wood stove and lamps.
    Would like to be there on a snowy day. Curl up in the loft and read
    a good book. What more could you ask for? Maybe a good companion. a cup of tea, and lots of chocolate chip cookies to munch on.
    Sheer perfection!

  • coffeewitholiver October 22, 2015, 8:26 pm

    It’s good to see really well-designed micro-homes. This one is larger than my space, and oh how those inches quickly add up to more relaxation room. 🙂
    I’d live in this home, definitely.
    Parker

  • kristina nadreau October 23, 2015, 12:42 am

    The basic design and exterior are very attractive. The real staircase seems excellent. I would like a bath and kitchen if It were mine. I enjoy the odd designs when people design exclusively for themselves

  • Ivanhoe October 23, 2015, 11:31 am

    Many of these tiny structures have no water facilities. Some may have outdoor water, but in cold climate that’s not a good thing. Besides you need to was cooking utensils, no?

    • alice h October 25, 2015, 11:18 am

      I lived without running water for years, still do part time. It’s easy enough to have a hygienic water set up that works with manual input. I call it my bucket and chuck it system. You can easily have a nice gravity feed system with taps and all if you want, just need to pump water up into a taller tank once in a while. It’s best to have a nearby source of good drinking water but many people rely on water delivery.

  • Kate October 23, 2015, 2:15 pm

    Obviously this is for one or two people. I love the floor, it is sturdy! It is obviously a place to shelter folks without being showy. Feed the fire in the evening, have a pot of soup cooking and let the cool darkness stay at a distance. I don’t think the first log cabins were this compact yet functional. (Yeah, I must be channeling my pioneer side.)

  • Theo November 14, 2015, 6:12 pm

    Well, first off, don’t see anything resembling a loo, or mention of one; if you think an outside loo is fine, try using one after dark in the middle of winter, that is not fine. Outside could definitely use some paint, or something, as is it looks pretty much abandoned. Does have what looks like a sturdy handrail tho, a definite plus, even tho yet another loft is a minus. Speaking of lofts, it says this one is 5 feet, so why wasn’t it made 6 feet, so at least most people could stand up in it?

    • Steve in Micco January 20, 2017, 8:29 am

      Theo, it is what it is. Obviously this is not your cup of meat. No need to denigrate his design. If it works for him, be happy for him. Since it doesn’t do it for you, no worries, build one that does melt your butter.

    • largemarge January 20, 2017, 9:08 pm

      Theo,

      Excellent question.

      Some tax assessors do not count square footage of a loft if its ceiling is five feet or less.

      In this example, adding another few inches of headroom could substantially increase the taxes.

      • Theo January 20, 2017, 10:00 pm

        Please people, do not respond to my posts. It tends to irritate me, and If I get irritated I may write something you won’t like.

        I don’t think tax assessors work that way, but no biggie. One, don’t have a loft, I never would. Two, put a false ceiling in the loft, then when the tax guy is gone raise it so you can stand up. I wouldn’t have one of these. Right now I’m searching for a suitable vehicle to convert, then I can travel, and/or live in it. Either that or pull a boat I can actually live in if desired.

        I would highly recommend that anyone thinking of buying one of these tiny homes consult with the designer before buying. Otherwise you’ll be getting with the designer thinks people want, which is why I think so many get resold.

        How can I stop getting e-mails?

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie January 23, 2017, 8:27 am

          Sorry, Theo. If at the time you posted you hit the “get email notifications in response to your posts” button, you’ll keep getting them. Just delete them 🙂

        • Paul January 23, 2017, 8:52 am

          In the email notification, simply click the link at the bottom – “Unsubscribe from all follow-up comments”… By the way, I’m pretty sure 5ft refers to the LENGTH of the loft, not the height.

        • Theo January 23, 2017, 11:50 am

          Wow, simple solution to not getting more e-mails. Except for that fact that there is no “Unsubscribe from all follow-up comments” link there. And I obviously do not want follow-up comments, so did not ask for them.

    • Michael L January 20, 2017, 10:14 pm

      Nice, rustic getaway. I agree that a few enhancements would make it more comfortable… like cooking and bathroom facilities!

  • jklenzak November 17, 2015, 9:50 am

    This would make an excellent short term hunting cabin for deer and just about any bird hunting. I would even use it as a fishing cabin if I were by myself and needed a minimum shelter.

  • Marsha Cowan November 18, 2015, 2:54 pm

    One of my very most favorite houses! This one I saw a few years back and it became the ultimate inspiration for me to build my first tiny house! I love everything about this cabin…

  • ZACHARY E MOHRMANN January 20, 2017, 7:43 am

    Very rusty, I mean rustic….! LoL….!

  • Gabriella January 20, 2017, 8:17 am

    The irresistible charm of the “Rough”

  • Paul January 20, 2017, 12:33 pm

    I can’t find anything on Finn’s website to confirm it, but I believe that corner next to the door & kitchen is the “toilet room” – right side of the second picture. AKA an “indoor outhouse” as I’ve seen some people call it, haha. Without running water, it would obviously have a composting toilet and no shower, thus my use of “toilet room” instead of “bathroom”. I’m not a big fan of lofts, but this is an awesome little cabin!

  • ROSEE January 20, 2017, 4:21 pm

    I love rustic and this TH is absolutely cozy and sweet. But I am a little wary of the rust on the outside. Hope no one cut themselves, while it was built. Well done though!

  • Marsha Cowan January 20, 2017, 7:18 pm

    I have always loved this little cabin. It is so cozy and rustic and warm.

    • Michael L January 20, 2017, 10:25 pm

      I agree Marsha… I can see myself and the fur babies cozied up with a book and a cup of tea on a chilly afternoon. The homes this man builds are artwork.

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