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Amsterdam 24 by Transcend Tiny Homes: REDUCED

This is the sleek and stylish Amsterdam 24 by Transcend Tiny Homes in Tennessee. The builder just reduced the price to $60,000 in preparation for their Manhattan 34 build.


They’d love to sell the Amsterdam 24 before beginning construction, so fill out the contact form below if you are interested in the home!

This home has a lot of great features, but by far the coolest is the HUGE closet area with plenty of hanging storage — it’s what we’ve all been waiting for! Besides that, you get a great kitchen, spacious loft bedroom and luxurious bathroom, as well as a comfy-looking living area.

Details below. Enjoy!

Related: Design Your Own Kootenay Model by TruForm Tiny Homes

Amsterdam 24 by Transcend Tiny Homes

I like the look of the exterior!

I’m immediately drawn in by the tile backsplash.

Is it just me or does that couch look extra cozy?

Time for dinner!

 

That loft is very spacious! I like the little office space too.

Perfect location for hanging out!

I actually love the large fridge and freezer here.

And I need a washer and dryer, too!

Super spacious shower for a tiny house!


 

Look at the cool towel rack. I need one!

Perfect amount of bathroom storage.

Related: Granville Tiny House by La Tiny House, France

Deep drawers — great for beauty products.

Now THAT is what we’ve all been waiting for in a THOW!

Video: Amsterdam 24 Tiny Home

Highlights: 

  • Composite wall system
  • Current structural tests withstood hurricane category 5 wind speeds of 156 miles per hour
  • Roof has an elastomeric coating for a water tight seal
  • Polymerized stucco and composite wood finishes complete the exterior
  • LG Ductless, 9,000 BTU Mini Split Heat Pump
  • Twinfresh ERV
  • Schlage, keyless entry and deadbolt locking system
  • IKEA sleeper sofa
  • Two storage ottomans
  • 160 cubic feet of keenly placed cabinet storage
  • 8 foot counter
  • Whirlpool Convection Microwave
  • Two burner induction cooktop (with a 7 piece cookware set)
  • Summit Ingenious Series
  • 18.7 cubic foot refrigerator (with ice maker)
  • 8′ x 7.5′ bathroom
  • 3′ x 4′ shower with a curved glass, sliding door
  • 30 gallon hot water heater
  • IKEA mirrored medicine cabinet (3 cu ft of storage)
  • 31″ vanity with 2 full depth drawers (8.8 cu ft of storage)
  • 6′ linen closet (8 cu ft of storage)
  • Kenmore stack 3.9 cu ft washer and 7 cu ft dryer with wrinkle guard
  • Two storage cubbies provide a place to keep reading material or a charging station for your electronics on the overnight
  • Two recessed over head lights illuminate the loft when broad general light is needed
  • Two-way light switches safely allow you to control lighting without the need to return down stairs in the evening.
  • All amenities including complete appliance package as seen, $69,700.

Contact Transcend: 

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Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee

Natalie C. McKee is a contributing writer for Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter. She is a coffee-loving wannabe homesteader who dreams of becoming self-sufficient in her own tiny home someday. Natalie currently resides in a tiny apartment with her husband, Casey, in Massachusetts.




{ 69 comments… add one }
  • Sonja March 18, 2017, 6:52 pm

    Only problem as far as I can tell, (and it’s an admittedly small one), is you’d need to move the sofa to access much of the closet storage. Even if you replaced the folding doors with sliders, the drawers on the right would be blocked, but that could always be seasonal storage. Otherwise, a great layout, great use of space and just overall, great! Go Ikea!

    • Sgmaps March 18, 2017, 9:53 pm

      I understand what you are saying, and thankfully the sofa is a sectional in 3 pieces. Good suggestions in regard to the sliding doors for the closet.
      The only personal issue I would have is the ladder instead of stairs. It is a higher price but it IS worth it.

    • Randy from Transcend March 19, 2017, 12:23 pm

      It is a sliding door. The door works very well for using all the space, leaving only a very small spot with limited access. You are right!

    • John Vickers March 20, 2017, 3:25 pm

      How about a slide out for the closet?

      • Yvonne Marmet March 22, 2017, 2:58 pm

        Do you mean as in an RV slide out?

      • Yvonne Marmet March 22, 2017, 3:20 pm

        Did you mean an RV slide out?

        • James D. June 6, 2017, 2:47 pm

          Probably not, there are closet slide outs too… Like for the hanger bar, so you don’t have to reach into the closet and it can be all laid out before you and then pushed back when done… Often this lets the depth of the closet be taken advantage of more easily and gives the convenience of a walk in with a smaller space…

        • Yvonne Marmet June 6, 2017, 4:10 pm

          This person has not answered so I do not know quite what they were looking for. Many people today are asking about slide outs like for RV units. We have chosen not to do so in part because of the leak issues that RVs normally have.

  • Dixie Whitley March 18, 2017, 7:04 pm

    One of the best I have seen—add4-6 ft and give me a downstairs bed and I would love it! Use the upstairs for company. And storage.

    • Sgmaps March 18, 2017, 10:08 pm

      Great suggestions and worth the extra $10K that would cost, but that does look like a very large loft.

    • Michael March 19, 2017, 12:33 am

      They have a 32′ model with free standing bed, a walk through bath I would put the kitchen to the other end and living space to the middle.

      • Randy from Transcend March 19, 2017, 12:30 pm

        We are working on a wider model with a cool trundle bed (No Loft). Should be out soon. However, it is 12ft wide, so it is not a THOW, it is for permanent install. But the real advantage is that it’s IBC code compliant, and it covers all accessory dwelling unit requirements for use in urban settings that have ADU provisions.

        • Cyndi ann March 22, 2017, 2:01 pm

          I really like all of this Tiny. I do not need such large w/d and just the apt size ‘fridge would do fine. As you say Randy about loft meaning possibly wider?, no loft is fine, but then, I am OK with just convertible sleeping down with narrowing closet space. Love the bath, great shower. 🙂

        • Yvonne Marmet March 22, 2017, 2:27 pm

          Cyndi ann all your ideas are easy to accomplish, can we help you further?

  • ZACHARY E MOHRMANN March 18, 2017, 7:31 pm

    I love it, and almost makes me want to move to Amsterdam…! And I know Amsterdam is predisposed to living tiny, I can see where these tiny houses will be a perfect for their life style…

    • Sgmaps March 18, 2017, 10:05 pm

      I may be wrong of course, but I got the impression that Amsterdam was only the model name of it, because it is built by Transcend Tiny Homes in Tennessee. In any case, even though this has a higher price tag, I feel this one is worth it. Very nice finishes, well laid out , my preference would be for stairs due to mobility issues, otherwise, I could definitely live there be very happy and not feel deprived of a nice home and have all the necessary amenities.

      • ZACHARY E MOHRMANN March 19, 2017, 6:33 am

        Nope you are absolutely correct, I made a big boo boo, I mistaken the house’s name for it’s origin, as I thought they were doing a story on tiny houses in Amsterdam, as we just seen one recently in France… So I thank you for pointing out my error… And who knows maybe one day we will read a story on a tiny house from Amsterdam as well as other countries.. So Thank you….!

    • bob faske March 18, 2017, 10:11 pm

      had to look a bit but this builder is located in oklahoma. nice design, a bit pricey, but weight is very light compared to convenentional construction. tow vehicle and location restrictions are big considerations in tiny world…

      • Randy Marmet March 19, 2017, 2:36 pm

        Thanks bob, for the keen observation. We have worked extremely hard to make way for modern lightweight construction. It means you can spend less on a truck to tow with because the truck does not need such a heavy capacity. By building this way we are also able to disconnect all the thermal bridging. It makes for an airtight, super efficient wall structure. So far, the refridgerator running is helping to keep the house warm in the cold.

  • keepyourpower March 18, 2017, 7:42 pm

    I wonder how comfortable that pull out bed is? Is there a way to make sure it has an orthopedic mattress?
    I would love to purchase this, but would need some kind of bed downstairs, for a very bad back..thus the question about the pull out bed. Guess I could put a Murphy bed where the sofa is…and have no window there.

    • Randy from Transcend March 19, 2017, 12:34 pm

      The bed that is in the sofa is made by IKEA if you want to check out how it is made. I did not get the immpression that it would be for everyday use. It is more for a few nights, unless your a kid. Sounds like you would need a Tiny with the master bedroom down. We have a lot of requests for that. Currently we have a 32ft model with the beroom down. More to come soon.

  • Sgmaps March 18, 2017, 10:09 pm

    Ummnn-where is the pull out bed please? What I see downstairs is the sectional sofa in 3 pieces , part of which is in front of that Amazing closet

    • Sgmaps March 18, 2017, 10:12 pm

      OOPS-I just reread the description and see that it says Ikea sleeper sofa-wow, that is a well disguised sofa bed. Apologies to keepyourpower.

  • Patricia Chang March 19, 2017, 2:30 am

    Very nice inside, for the most part. I think the refrigerator could be smaller, and stairs with an outside rail added. That would add storage and safety and appeal to a wider range of ages. I would prefer a frosted door on the shower. You could spend your life cleaning a clear one ;or just use an attractive shower curtain with a curved rod. They should have an interior decorator for TH model do something for the wardrobe doors, both to give the sitting area depth and color. To each his own on that. It would be nice to have a skylight in the loft.

    • Yvonne Marmet March 21, 2017, 12:03 pm

      The fridge could be smaller however we have been getting requests for larger food storage. We designed the access to the loft as simple as possible to allow greater room size on the main floor. Stairs typically take up about 6 lateral feet but yes, they can provide storage but in our case they would eliminate the dining area. We have a variety of wardrobe door choices, we chose a neutral scheme to allow the owner to run wild with their personal preferences. Lastly we were striving for low energy use and well sealed windows and have not found a solid roof retains the most energy where a skylight would loose a great deal of energy.

  • Sandi B March 19, 2017, 7:46 am

    This is a great THOW with very innovative storage. I like the size of the refrigerator and length of the counter and also like the induction cook top.
    I might do away with the dining table and do stairs with storage. Other than that, this is a very well thought out unit. The bathroom is a great size and the closet at the end of the living room works well. I might use a roller type shade for the cover of that closet. You could even decorate one or have made from decorative material. That way you would have full access to the closet, would not have to move the storage cubes etc. Certainly something to think about and good ideas to use.

    • Yvonne Marmet March 21, 2017, 12:10 pm

      Good idea on a shade to cover the closet. With both doors sliding easily left and right we tested it for days using the living room for seating, sleeping and dressing and found it easy to use since 90% of the time access to the wardrobe can be completed by not moving anything at all. However, if someone needed to move the seating it slides easily.

  • Dominick Bundy March 19, 2017, 10:41 am

    Best closet setup ever so far in a “tiny house” but what I’m starting to notice that these tiny houses are becoming no so tiny any more. and seem to get bigger and bigger with every presentation.. the bigger the house the more it will cost and before you know it a mortgage will be needed , and we are right back where we started from embracing the rat race of mortgages again to what we were trying to be free from.. the bigger and more space one has the desire to fill it with stuff you don’t need. Just something to think about….

    • Randy from Transcend March 19, 2017, 12:43 pm

      We are finding the the psychological impact of a very small THOW can be trying. 24ft is the smallest one we make right now. We can build for a lesser finished price if needed, but the small lifestyle is SO enhanced with a few extra niceties like high end appliances. We also agree that affordability is important, and we understand that. Finding that balance varies for different people. We are open to discussions of differing lifestyles and budgets.

  • joe March 19, 2017, 5:20 pm

    I think this is a really beautiful tiny home. IKEA has some awesome options for kitchen cabinets and bathroom fixtures that are not outrageously expensive.

  • David Lypchuk March 19, 2017, 5:26 pm

    i am a huge lover of tiny homes. i envision myself in one, one day.

    but until designers start addressing main-floor bedroom design into these tiny homes, they will never gain mass-appeal.

    i do not want to clamber up a ladder, nor do i want to crouch around in my sleeping quarters.

    thank you.

    • Randy Marmet March 19, 2017, 5:42 pm

      We understand and agree with you we have one model with the bedroom on the lower floor right now. We are in development of other models now that have the bedroom on the main floor. We have an advantage for this because we can make a longer home and still not be too heavy because of our lightweight composite construction. Thank you for the comment!

    • oxide March 20, 2017, 9:22 pm

      Please stop expecting these designers to be gods. It’s nearly impossible to fit a first-floor bedroom into a tiny home and still call it tiny. The 400 sq ft park models can put in a 1st floor bedroom easily, but 8.5 foot wide THOWs are just too small. The only way to fit in a 1st floor sleeping area is either go without a living area, or convert the living area to a sleeping area every night.

      • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee March 21, 2017, 7:24 am

        Have to agree with Oxide on this one. Very hard to “do it all.”

  • Danielle DiLisio March 19, 2017, 5:36 pm

    What a great home and the price tag is very reasonable!

  • Rusty Kerr March 19, 2017, 7:49 pm

    Very nice thow, especially like the bathroom, closet, and 30 gallon water heater. I would love it to be 30 feet long for a larger living area and no loft with a 9 foot ceiling. The living area would have a day bed disguised as a sofa.

    • Randy Marmet March 19, 2017, 8:53 pm

      Rusty, I am sure we can build one for you that would accommodate those needs. Actually I like your idea. I think as long as we found a nice convertible sofa bed, then it would be workable. We know of a couple examples of some nice convertible furniture that would work well.

  • Linda Hodges March 19, 2017, 9:32 pm

    There are Murphy beds that have a built in sofa, so if you are willing t0 ditch the window, or have a very small vertical window it is possible. AND the murphy couch slides very easily! Love this house.

    • Randy Marmet March 19, 2017, 9:42 pm

      Linda, you are so right the Murphy bed with the folding couch is an awesome solution. It’s a little on the heavy side and I have not looked at it yet directly but I believe it is built well. Plus, there are a lot of sofa bed options that would work well to and maybe not have to give up the window. It’s exciting to see all the different viewpoints of how this can be done! We have customers asking for these types of things now so as we get pictures of them we will be posting.

  • Nanny M March 20, 2017, 2:54 am

    This is one of the nicest I’ve seen. So many fine touches. I especially appreciate the closet, kitchen storage, bathroom, refrigerator/freezer, washer and dryer and the picture book view when you come in the door. Probably good feng shui. So much like a regular house tucked in a tiny space. Excellent.

    • Randy Marmet March 20, 2017, 9:50 am

      Nanny: Thank you for the kind words! You have really looked it over completely. May we quote you for a testimonial? We will only use your name, Nanny M. If yes, you can email me here: [email protected]

  • Elle March 21, 2017, 7:28 am

    Very nice design for this size thow. There’s a pleasing feel about the home. Good kitchen storage with easy access all ’round. Superior! Baths in tiny homes seem more often than not to be an afterthought. This bath looks as if you wouldn’t be bumping your elbows every time you turned around and it has good storage for necessary items. The bedroom, although a loft style, too has that feel of roominess like a real home should.

    If there is a detractor, I’d agree that it’s the closet in the front living area. It’s a great idea for a storage facility and much needed but the obstruction of the sectional every time you use the drawers is a bit of a problem. I use my closet several times a day. If it were obstructed at all it would create a big annoyance. Noticed someone said you could put seasonal clothing in the obstructed drawer area. Although, that would work, it’s not very practical and only provides a “work-around”. The builder noted above that the frig keeps the house warm. I don’t doubt it. That a big frig. Lovely, well designed, good use of available market goods such as Ikea and pleasant color combos.

  • kidcardona March 22, 2017, 4:32 am

    l liked this layout. l am not a fan of ladders, so for me l think switching places of the fridge and makibg it a washer/dryer front loader, in one, would allow for creatively adding stairs. just a thought. over all great job you guys. it is always a pleasure to see different ideas here

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee March 22, 2017, 8:16 am

      Good thoughts 🙂

      • Transcend May 31, 2017, 11:29 am

        Natalie, could you contact me as I am waiting to update this listing with a price reduction that I submitted a few days ago. When that happens, do we delete this post??
        Thanks

        • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee June 1, 2017, 2:54 pm

          Hey! Can you shoot me an email to [email protected]? Let me know what updates you need done and I’ll get to it asap! Sorry for the delay.

    • Yvonne March 22, 2017, 8:45 am

      Yes you’re correct that would be a good place to swap a couple items are home being fiberglass wall panels is extremely airtight we would need to find an all-in-one combo washer that vents outside not venting into the house if so that would be a good swap

  • eric March 22, 2017, 6:51 pm

    “Look at the cool towel rack. I need one!”

    Ha ha, omg, those have been around since the 1800’s where they were used to dry tea towels and dish cloths from the heat of a coal fired cooking range, ala woodburner as opposed to an open fireplace. Watch period dramas like Upstairs, Downstairs for confirmation.

    • Natalie C. McKee Natalie C. McKee March 27, 2017, 9:11 am

      Just because it’s old doesn’t mean it’s not great 🙂 I feel the same way about wood burning stoves — need one!

      • yvonne March 28, 2017, 11:04 am

        Sorry Natalie, since we are so efficiently air tight a wood stove is not in our immediate future. Fires burn oxygen and need a house that “breathes” to work well.

        • James D. June 17, 2017, 3:42 pm

          Yvonne, wood stove technology has advanced quite a lot in the last two decades…

          Ever since 1989, the EPA has started requiring higher efficiency standards. Though, this is one of the reasons some places have made standard fire places illegal as they don’t meet those standards, the options of newer systems are fairly extensive…

          For example, many modern wood stoves allow for direct air inlet from the outside.

          Electronically controlled stoves, like wood pellet stoves, even allow the stove to be controlled by a thermostat… Though, check cost and availability of pellets in the area as they’re not always an economical choice in all places but where they work it can be very convenient…

          There’s also gravity fed pellet stoves if electricity isn’t an option for an off-grid scenario…

          It’s mainly tricky finding wood stoves with glass doors to still allow the ambiance of looking at the fire like a fireplace… but it’s otherwise sealed up and just a good heat source…

          Though, like anything dealing with fire, users should be aware of proper maintenance, clearances, and what they can and can’t burn in the stove.

          Wood with sap can spark, smoke, and even explode, for example and it’s best to use seasoned wood that has had time to dry properly…

          While small burners can have issues of getting hot enough to operate smokeless… Many use a secondary burn process where the air flow is preheated by the fire and allows the smoke to be ignited for a more complete burn, generating up to 70% of the heat output from burning the smoke. But that’s hard to do if the fire doesn’t get hot enough in a small stove, which means they will need to be cleaned out more often.

          Small stoves also run into the issue of needing smaller pieces of wood, meaning users need to break down usually larger logs, and usually don’t contain enough material for running more than a few hours at a time… So may be hard to get a full nights sleep without supplementing with a secondary heat source like a electric heater that can kick in when the thermostat detects temp starting to drop…

          Though a pellet stove can have enough fuel capacity to run for hours and even days but depends if that’s an economically viable option…

          While most stoves requires a fair amount of clearance, there are options for low clearance… Marine stoves like Dickerson brand are favored for this reason… Some wood Cook Stoves can also have very low clearance and can have just half of inch of shielding material to let it be placed right next to other appliances.

          Wood burning furnaces, heaters can also channel the heat and thus clearances mainly need to only be maintain at the heat exhausts venting points.

          Further, there’s a number of accessories to consider as well… Heat exchangers allow wood stoves to be used to help heat hot water for the house, which can also be combined with other options like solar thermal… Provided you have a water tank the heat exchanger can be integrated into…

          Thermoelectric generators or stirling engines connected to generators an also allow them to be used to generate electricity… Simple kits allow 10W, 15W, and 45W options and some go higher to 100W and above… Enough to power some lights and charge portable electronics…

          Other accessories include thermal powered fans that when placed on top of the stove help circulate the air to more efficiently spread the heat and there’s also a lamp that turns the heat into energy to provide light and the pro version has a battery that can be charged this way to also allow USB charging of your phone, etc. as well as allow the lamp/light to be used away from the stove for periods of time…

          So, it does require careful considerations but it is possible to have a wood stove in a airtight tiny house… a number of people have already done this!

  • JanneZack March 23, 2017, 10:04 pm

    Wow! Nice.

  • Bigfoot June 3, 2017, 9:09 am

    Beautiful build Transcend team! Like all homes big or small, custom or spec, there are always so many directions available & compromises to be made. Y’all did a great job in juggling the compromises. A few friendly suggestions–
    I like that your tiny is geared towards everyday living with the larger fridge, large shower, sizable vanity/bathroom, W/D stack, & reasonable storage space. I like the recessed lighting also as well as the white walls & lighter colored trim. It keeps it nice & airy feeling while being easy for your customers to customize/decorate to their tastes. As others have mentioned, I think a murphy bed/couch combo would be the ticket for downstairs sleeping but probably wouldn’t work well in a 24′ unit. However, with a little juggling of the overall dimensions starting at the kitchen & terminating with bathroom, you may be able to squeeze out enough room to install a horizontal murphy bed & still have the windows. Hard to tell the length (LR to kitchen area) you have to work with from the pics. I would also consider breaking the closet doors just above the top of the couch so you have 4 doors instead of 2, allowing access to the upper closets without moving the couch sections.
    The exterior has a very classy look to it! I was wondering how long you have been using polymerized stucco & how it has held up on your other builds? Any details on the exterior wood composite?
    Water heaters were discussed recently in another post – I’d install an easily accessible wall switch to turn the heater on & off as needed for energy conservation. Cost would be negligible at the time of the build but another cool energy saving feature you could add for your customers. I installed one years ago in my bathroom so I don’t have to go to the breaker box every time. You could also put a timer on the circuit as well. As you probably know, water heaters should be drained/flushed annually for maximum service life (hardly anyone does this) so maybe plumb it to easily accomplish this task. Again, negligible cost but a clear benefit for your potential customers. I’ve replaced quite a few heaters in my time & they are rarely easy to drain/service/or replace.
    I was wondering if you included designated tie down spots on the trailer frame? I did not see that on your website. To me, this should be standard on any trailer home or RV & so easy to accomplish at the construction stage. I’ve had to run from many hurricanes living in FL all my life & it’s always kinda gut wrenching to wonder what you are coming back too.
    Wind test methodology? Was it on an actual trailer build or the wall system bolted to a concrete floor?
    Elastomeric roof coating- have you considered TPO instead. 80mil would give you a 25-30 year life cycle while being very easy to clean/maintain. Maybe as a customer option? I love the fact that Transcend has addressed the thermal bridging issues for the complete envelope. Most of the R values listed for conventionally framed units are mainly theoretical & don’t represent the real world build at all.
    Again, great job & best wishes with your biz! Hopefully I didn’t bombard you with too many questions 😉

    • Yvonne June 3, 2017, 9:38 am

      Thanks for your personal observations. Many of your additions would be great to include however, I wonder if the price of additional items or adjustments would be well received. I say this because we have the price down and still not any serious inquires. It’s frustrating sat best 😞

      • James D. June 6, 2017, 3:01 pm

        Might just need some better marketing… I know a lot of people looking for Tiny Houses usually have no clue where to look or what companies are even in their area…

        Though, there is still a disconnect on fair pricing and what some people think they should be priced at but with most people not knowing what home ownership really costs it’s a general problem…

        Perhaps a breakdown comparison of what it costs to live in a regular house versus one of your tiny houses could help… Showing how much they will save in the long run, as some people just need that spelled out for them to get past the notion that regular houses are always a better deal…

        Customer testimonials and video tours that answer common questions are usually pluses too… Especially, if you can answer common questions like where they can legally place their tiny house or at least where to ask, what insurance options can they look for, etc.

        • Yvonne Marmet June 16, 2017, 8:46 am
        • Yvonne Marmet June 16, 2017, 8:48 am

          I sent you a response last week and I do not think it linked properly to you when I responded. Sorry

        • Yvonne Marmet June 16, 2017, 8:49 am

          Yvonne Marmet June 6, 2017, 4:03 pm
          Thanks James, all good points! I would hope that if you checked out our website you could see the extensive time we have put into its development both in visual aids and content. We have a blog post that has been quite well received on the cost comparison of purchasing a Tiny Home in comparison to a Conventional Home. We found the numbers astounding!
          Two of the initial issues are with Financing and Insurance.
          Financing is a matter of a few things

          Credit Score
          Money Down
          Job History
          Payment Fee Monthly

          RVIA Certification gets you the quickest financing and insurance coverage if you are in good shape with the above items. Having said that, if an individual cannot meet those items, that pretty much kills a sale.
          We hope that once Financial Institutions recognize a Tiny Home as a financeable item, things will change. So far everyone we have tried to work thru considers them a high risk item. How long that takes…no one knows.

          Insurance
          This seems to have just about the same parameters as financing. Many companies offer RV financing if the unit is RVIA Certified. Thus if the individual can get RV financing, insurance is simple in most cases.

          We personally view our units and a HOME and will be choosing NOAH Certification going forward. One down side is that they are not recognized by Financial Institutions at this time, only rarely. Foremost Insurance will nationwide insure Tiny Homes with NOAH Certification.
          We also have info on places to park and contact information available by email of individuals selling small parcels of land without restrictions.

          Our product may just be to advanced for the time as serious technology has gone into meeting hurricane codes for structure and balancing it with an extremely light weight unit for the size in comparison to traditional Tiny House builds that are out of wood.

          We always see room for improvement and appreciate your observations.

          Read more at http://tinyhousetalk.com/amsterdam-24-by-transcend-tiny-homes/#8HrTLhGbI4FRMSHB.99

  • Yvonne Marmet June 6, 2017, 4:03 pm

    Thanks James, all good points! I would hope that if you checked out our website you could see the extensive time we have put into its development both in visual aids and content. We have a blog post that has been quite well received on the cost comparison of purchasing a Tiny Home in comparison to a Conventional Home. We found the numbers astounding!
    Two of the initial issues are with Financing and Insurance.
    Financing is a matter of a few things

    Credit Score
    Money Down
    Job History
    Payment Fee Monthly

    RVIA Certification gets you the quickest financing and insurance coverage if you are in good shape with the above items. Having said that, if an individual cannot meet those items, that pretty much kills a sale.
    We hope that once Financial Institutions recognize a Tiny Home as a financeable item, things will change. So far everyone we have tried to work thru considers them a high risk item. How long that takes…no one knows.

    Insurance
    This seems to have just about the same parameters as financing. Many companies offer RV financing if the unit is RVIA Certified. Thus if the individual can get RV financing, insurance is simple in most cases.

    We personally view our units and a HOME and will be choosing NOAH Certification going forward. One down side is that they are not recognized by Financial Institutions at this time, only rarely. Foremost Insurance will nationwide insure Tiny Homes with NOAH Certification.
    We also have info on places to park and contact information available by email of individuals selling small parcels of land without restrictions.

    Our product may just be to advanced for the time as serious technology has gone into meeting hurricane codes for structure and balancing it with an extremely light weight unit for the size in comparison to traditional Tiny House builds that are out of wood.

    We always see room for improvement and appreciate your observations.

    • James D. June 16, 2017, 6:52 pm

      Cool, I’d suggest expanding on the costs comparisons for day to day life things like how many Tiny Houses are so efficient that utility costs can be less than $30 a month in the middle of winter or summer, for example…

      Real world examples of cost savings can help it sink in better as not everyone will accept the home ownership costs alone… Especially, if they don’t understand what many of those costs are for…

      While for financing…

      There are additional options…

      Like a Home Equity Loan or Home Equity Line of Credit, those who already own a home but want to downsize can use this to use their existing home equity to finance the costs of building the Tiny House…

      Some banks will provide unsecured personal loans that consumers can use to finance small homes without needing a property for collateral, such as the one you link to… It’s just usually a higher interest rate as the usual trade off but some banks specialize in unsecured loans and can provide lower-than-expected interest rates…

      As you probably know, lenders at LightStream look at borrowers’ credit histories, incomes, assets, and debts. So borrowers with high credit scores, low debt, a steady job, and strong incomes are more likely to qualify for an unsecured loan with them.

      Some tiny house association can also allow Peer-to-Peer Loan lending, where fellow Tiny House owners and advocates can help others achieve the dream of owning a Tiny House…

      For those with a compelling story, options like GoFundMe, etc. could be another possibility as well.

      While on the business side, you may consider rent to own options as alternatives to the standard business model…

      There’s also alternative resources to consider… Like some schools teaching construction, architecture, etc. have opted to use Tiny Houses as a way to teach students how the building industry works and how all the different disciplines work together but the resulting house they build is usually donated to a charity…

      Builders like yourselves could possibly establish a relationship with one of these schools and establish a mutually beneficial arrangement… Allowing you to give clients you may not otherwise be able to help a possible option…

      As well as possible benefit to your business if the school is willing to set up an internship program with your business or otherwise list you as a local company they can recommend as well as help make it easier to spread the word on your business… A lot can be done when communities and businesses can work together for a common goal…

      • Yvonne Marmet June 17, 2017, 6:38 am

        May I ask your level of participation in this industry? Job experience or current field?

        • James D. June 17, 2017, 5:09 pm

          Currently, I’m an advocate for alternative living options and DIY’er with a wide field of side interests… Mainly, I like to help people and teach myself new skills…

          I tend to be all over the place, I’ve worked as a general laborer and handyman, I’ve put together computers for people who wanted custom systems, I’ve helped people fix their computers (PC and Mac) and other devices, did some freelance tech support for awhile, I’ve worked as a graphic artist (self taught) for digital photography, I’ve been a digital photographer, I’ve done print press, I’ve done some retail work with visual, ad-set, sales, etc…

      • Yvonne Marmet June 17, 2017, 4:03 pm

        James D. I wanted to respond to your comments above about wood stoves. But there was not a link available for me to reply there so I will try and reply here. The other individuals have chosen to put wood stoves in an airtight and varmint we professionally choose not to assume that liability because we do not believe it is safe in our home.

        • James D. June 17, 2017, 5:26 pm

          Okay, I understand even though properly installed it’s generally no more dangerous than a propane, gas, or other combustion based heater.

          But liability can definitely be a concern, as they’re not as widely accepted anymore and most offer less control because they can’t be controlled by a thermostat, except for exceptions like pellet stoves…

          Along with requiring the owners have the knowledge to operate them properly.

          Perhaps something to consider later, like under a waiver system where the owners take responsibility for its installation… and of course you can’t be responsible for something the customer does after they buy the house from you, if they install one themselves without your knowledge…

          While, they can also be installed outside… Wood stoves can also be configured like furnaces/boilers, but again, liability is a understandable concern. So I understand the choice not to offer them…

        • Yvonne Marmet June 17, 2017, 6:05 pm

          Spell check got me –omit varmint.🙄

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