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832 Sq. Ft. 2-BR 1-BA Cottage For Sale in Memphis, TN

This is an 832 sq. ft. 2-bedroom, 1-bathroom cottage for sale in Memphis, Tennessee from one of our readers, Dwayne Jones who is a contractor and missionary.

“I have been following you site for a while and decided to submit some pictures from my latest project a 832 sq. ft. home located in Memphis, Tennessee. My name is Dwayne A. Jones and I’m a contractor and missionary. Traveling to Ghana West Africa since 2003, Haiti since 2008, and India for the first time last year in 2014, I’ve dreamed of building small affordable houses world-wide. This house is a start of many projects to encourage sustainable living. I plan to start on a trailer mounted tiny home in a few months. Please see the attached pictures of my 2 bedroom and 1 bath home with 10′ ceilings. The selling price is $68,500. Thank you for any consideration of sharing my home.”

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share this little cottage below. Thank you!

832 Sq. Ft. 2-BR 1-BA Cottage For Sale

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Images © Dwayne Jones

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Images © Dwayne Jones

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 49 comments… add one }
  • Alex February 9, 2015, 1:19 pm

    If you’re interested in making an offer you can reach Dwayne at d12pray AT yahoo DOT com 🙂

    • Breda Mason April 10, 2015, 4:24 pm

      I want so bad, a sm log cabin. Lg. living room, full size kit. bath with tub.
      Loft upstairs for beds. I need to have it as close to Prior Lake Mn. Any takers I would love to hear from you. Has to be well insulated & room for a wood burning fireplace. Please let me know? Thanks, Brenda Mason , Forest, Va.

  • Randi February 9, 2015, 2:35 pm

    This is lovely! Fine craftsmanship Dwayne. Even the price
    is very reasonable.

  • Nancy h February 9, 2015, 2:35 pm

    Are you going to start showing the comments again? I miss them.
    Enjoy your site and look forward to the newsletter:)

  • Cahow February 9, 2015, 2:37 pm

    Dear Mr. Dwayne A. Jones,

    God Bless YOU and the work that you do for Humanity. I wish you a speedy sale on this beautiful and very desirably priced small home. Anyone would be lucky to live here. <3 Best of luck with your missionary work. ~Cahow~

  • Nancy h February 9, 2015, 2:37 pm

    Whoops guess I’m mistaken as I see mine just posted. Sorry Alex

  • Bonny February 9, 2015, 2:45 pm

    This size of home is just what most people had in the 1930s and early 1940s. It is plenty big enough for a family of four or four retirees and, certainly, more affordable and easier to maintain, clean, and heat/cool. A very good design on this one, and you can add bookcases, a rolling island for the kitchen, etc. to make it more functional for your life.

    • Cahow February 9, 2015, 3:04 pm

      I agree with you, Bonny! When I lived off and on with my Mum, she and her husband had an 800 sq.ft. “Veteran’s Home” as did every.single. G.I. that came home from Korea. It sold for the OUTRAGEOUS PRICE of….are we sitting down…$12,500.00!!!! (that’s a new auto, nowadays!) Full basement, 3 small bedrooms, one bath, eat-in kitchen. Kid’s bedrooms were big enough for a twin bed, dresser and nightstand; each had a small closet. Parent’s room was slightly bigger. No shower (that was a luxury back then; no garage, either.) Second stories and second baths were unheard of in that area.

      One family across from my Mum and step dad had 12 kids: they stacked them up like cord-wood in the basement in bunk-beds. LOL Everyone thrived; huge yard meant HUGE gardens for food and fun. Thousands upon thousands of returning G.I.’s got these homes on the G.I. Bill with zero money down; too bad we can’t help returning veteran’s like this, again.

      Nowadays, these homes are unrecognizable. I don’t go back but friends from high school have sent me photos: 2nd story added, 2-3 car garages, huge wings built out of them. And they are selling for $900,000 because the Back Water I spent time in is now HOT PROPERTY in Minneapolis. Before the bridge was built over the Mississippi River, it was where the Po’ Folks Hung Their Hat.

      • Bonny McDaniel February 9, 2015, 7:08 pm

        We had a two bedroom, one bath and a huge garden in the early ‘4os…four of us plus a dog…it never felt crowded. Of course, children were trained to be quiet and didn’t have to have a game console or their own TV or computer! Because there wasn’t any such animal! I wish this house showed a floor plan with room measurements.

        • Cahow February 9, 2015, 7:44 pm

          Hi, again, Bonny. I use *bing* as my search engine.

          If you type in “floor plan for 800 sq. ft 2-br 1-ba cottage”under IMAGES, then 100’s of small floor plans for that square footage will show you all the variations out there. I hope that helps you. 😀

        • Dean March 11, 2015, 3:26 am

          I agree with both of you guys. This is a lovely home, designed in a very classic style. If my life were moving down to where this house is, I’d be in contact with Dwayne in a heartbeat.

  • Karen R February 9, 2015, 2:45 pm

    Yes! Liveable homes for less than $75,000 are needed – desperately – in this country! BLESS YOU!!!

  • Bonny February 9, 2015, 2:47 pm

    Sorry…didn’t mean ‘four retirees’…just one or two!

    • lon hirsch February 9, 2015, 7:12 pm

      with the disappearing pension and coming cuts to ssi, why not?

  • CathyAnn February 9, 2015, 4:16 pm

    What a nice house. There are many ways it could be furnished to adapt to one’s needs. You did a beautiful job on it, and the price is right. If I had a “thumbs up” icon, it would go right here.

  • Rick Sanders February 9, 2015, 4:51 pm

    Where is the cottage located in Memphis

  • Eloise February 9, 2015, 4:56 pm

    Will second Cahow’s comment above. May God richly bless your missionary work and your dreams for the future of building sustainable, affordable housing! I am aware of the desperate need for such in many parts of the world. (I was a missionary in Nigeria, and driving outside the town used to be upset by what I saw the people living in. Homes made of whatever pieces of trash would keep out the rain…) Anyway, I too wish you a speedy sale.

  • Shirlok February 9, 2015, 5:04 pm

    Not a tiny house in my mind. My ex and I bought a 900 sq ft house in 1980, built in 1950 in the Bay Area. We paid $65k. Originally sold for $9k. Now it would sell for (and has sold) $500k. Well-made, lath and plaster, great floor plan, single car garage, HUGE yard, but I’d never pay that much for it.
    A question for CAHOW: are there still new cars available for $12,500. My current car is 13 years old and I paid $26,000 in 2002 and it’s nothing special. Just wondering because I never look at cars anymore.

  • Eloise February 9, 2015, 5:07 pm

    Goodness! I was interrupted and missed saying, your home is very functional and cozy. The height of the ceilings makes it feel even more open. It’s a great price! God bless your endeavors to sell it (I prayed for you before I began this post and will continue to do so each time God brings you to mind.)

  • Sharon February 9, 2015, 5:15 pm

    Hello PEOPLE!
    Put.
    Your.
    Lids.
    And.
    Seats.
    DOWN.
    Please.

    • Cahow February 9, 2015, 5:35 pm

      Huh.
      I.
      See.
      That.
      You’re.
      Enjoying.
      Your.
      “Special”.
      Brownies.,
      Again.

      • Susan Johnson February 9, 2015, 8:49 pm

        Actually, special brownies just might be good for what ails Sharon.

        • Cahow February 10, 2015, 10:14 am

          LOL You must have “insider information” about her that I lack. 😉

  • organicpc February 9, 2015, 5:54 pm

    Please, please, please….let someone stage it for you. Inside & out. Live plants, color throws, art….local if possible.

    As previously noted….lids down on commode.

    A floor plan would be good & I’d suggest doing away with the “hallway” as much as possible. If it (hall) devides the bedrooms that could easily become more storage or closet space.

    Gutters & downspouts recommended…..question…any reason the light switches & electrical outlets couldn’t be the same height? Not sure what codes permits…..uneven ie: kitchen wall looks out of kilter. Little things, but they add up, especially in a tiny home.

    Well done overall & thank goodness you’re doing it. The senior boomers are about to really retire & this house is perfect…aging in our homes is preferred to nursing homes…think communities. Central laundry, gardens….fruit & vegetable…Oh…and Carlotta.

  • gale February 9, 2015, 6:14 pm

    Outstanding and very affordable. Nice job inside and out. Much like the home I grew up in and we were a family of 5 with plenty of room. Hope to see many more of these. God bless you in your missionary work.

  • Gloria February 9, 2015, 7:55 pm

    Wow, what a great house for the price. Truly lovely. I wish much luck to the seller too! Godspeed on his adventures. –gv

  • monika jayne February 9, 2015, 8:33 pm

    This looks to be a good size, and the house has pretty good curb appeal. Wish the house was more fully furnished so that the space could be better judged. This is the type of Tiny I might be interested in. Somewhere between 800-999 sq. ft. on a foundation, and one level. Thank you for bringing it here!

  • Rob February 9, 2015, 8:55 pm

    We are working on developing a community in Middle Tennessee. Veterans,Elderly and young folks starting out are target markets. We want to develop these modular homes at such a price as to be affordable to anyone, good or bad credit, for $500/mo. Ten to twelve years,rent to own. Since they are modular, they can be moved off site when the individual decides to move out.

  • Cory February 9, 2015, 9:06 pm

    Thank you for bringing good quality affordable homes to those of us who aren’t ready to pour all our income into something enormous! I definitely want to encourage you to pay close attention to the layouts – in these small homes it makes a huge difference! I see some room for improvement with the kitchen layout, room sizing/placement, etc. Natural and artificial light are also very important. I grew up with the standard “ceiling fan and light in the middle of the room” also, and after experiencing other options, I discovered a better way to light spaces – and they don’t cost any more! I wish you all the best of luck. Don’t hesitate to ask me or lots of other folks in the Tiny House Movement for advice on how to create beautiful, functional, affordable homes!

  • Dorrettras Hunt February 9, 2015, 10:39 pm

    Dwayne this house is prefect for many families, young singles, couples and long term roommates around the globe. I pray God continues to bless you with this wonderful vision to help his people live in nice affordable homes. I think people might take having too much space for granted. . I raised three beautiful children in a large spacious one bedroom duplex for years. And we all appreciated the love and closeness we share even today from that experience. Our home was full of love and peace that everyone who entered it shared. Thx for sharing your vision with us.

  • Linda February 10, 2015, 12:08 am

    Whoa! I get the strangest, creepiest feeling when I see this house. I don’t know why. It is a very nice house.

    • Cahow February 10, 2015, 10:16 am

      Your comment intrigued me so I had to take another look at the place. I ‘get’ where you’re coming from and attribute it to the sparse furnishings and all the closed and shuttered windows. It gives off an air of abandonment or eviction; you’re very intuitive.

      • Mike February 10, 2015, 3:32 pm

        Needs more in windows and light, and a front porch! Otherwise, very simple and practical.

      • Susan Johnson February 11, 2015, 5:11 am

        hmm…I too took another look because I remembered a slightly unsettled feeling while looking at the pics, and hurried away from a few. The one with the bentwood rocker is the ghostliest, as if Norman Bates’ mom just got out of it. Must be a trick of the light in these pics? I really like the house in spite of the “eerie”.

  • Vicki February 10, 2015, 4:14 am

    We live in a 800 square foot mobile home but it isn’t nearly as nice as this! Beautiful work…would love to be one of those to get into that community…hubby and I are both disabled but he is the only one with income. I made the “terrible” decision to be a stay at home mom because our son had a hearing problem. What a sin, according to the government anyway…not enough work credits to get SSDI…and hubby “makes too much” on SSDI for me to get SSI. It is tight…but God supplies. 🙂 Bet the government can’t imagine that! I wouldn’t take a million dollars for the wonderful time I had with my son! No regrets…

  • organicpc February 10, 2015, 9:40 pm

    Rob…please send info on the “middle Tennessee” community. The need is here and everywhere…How can we help with your project?

    Organicpc

  • Rich February 11, 2015, 9:01 am

    The bathroom sink isn’t very practical for a left-handed person. I would elbow the wall every time I moved.

  • Theresa February 12, 2015, 9:26 pm

    I would like to know also I’m on disability I need a cheap place to live cut down on bills and live peacefully in a little house

  • Andrea Clark February 15, 2015, 11:29 pm

    This is a cute house, over 800 sq. fit. and is $68,500, so why is a cute tiny home of 200 or less sq. ft. for the same or $10,000 lower. Some of the tiny homes i’ve seen are way over priced. It’s unfortunate as people who could benefit from a smaller home and smaller price who need housing could afford to live this way if the initial cost wasn’t so high. my son has a nice starter home he bought for $60,000 with a garage and basement so why are some tiny homes $45-65,000?? this has been bugging me. i would love to live this way, but i just can’t afford it unless i build my own, which is impossible for me as I’m legally blind. Being in a small space and knowing where everything is very important to me, easier to find things and get around. Hopefully the prices will go down in the future.

    • Cahow February 16, 2015, 3:27 pm

      Hi, Andrea. Hopefully, you’ll see my answer to you so that you can have some clarity about current tiny house prices and it will stop “bugging you.” 😀

      Here’s my personal example. My husband and I bought a cottage in 1997 on an acre of land for $40,000. Today, it is worth over $300,000. We’ve done NOTHING to it but enjoy it and live in it; it’s just that our area is now deemed “tony” and the Weekender’s are gobbling up the cottages that they once ~sniffed~ at. When you ask “Why could your son buy a nice starter home for $60,000 with a garage/basement years ago when a brand new tiny house under 200 sq.ft. costs the same price?”, this is the answer: Time and the cost of materials respective to that time.

      Let’s say that your son’s house was built 30 years ago. The cost of labor and materials that went into that house is priced at THIRTY YEAR OLD COSTS. Anything built in 2015 is billed out at 2015 costs of materials and labor. That’s why it just boggles my mind that people attracted to small (400-800 sq.ft.) foundation homes don’t look into smaller, more rural areas of the U.S. where those homes are almost always under $65,000!!!!

      Since I work in the construction trade, I would NEVER create or buy a brand new home for myself…EVER! You’re paying top dollar for every door knob, appliance, window, etc. rather than paying for a house where everything was bought and paid for decades earlier. So, while labor for an old dwelling was perhaps $10/hr back in 1980, it’s now $100/hr for the same labor. Our cottage was Turn Key ready when we bought it: every single appliance was there, every window, etc. We just cleaned it and moved our stuff inside.

      I hope my explanation helps you understand the disparity between how much land/house you can buy when it’s been built vs. having a brand new tiny house constructed for you. 😀

      • Andrea Clark February 16, 2015, 4:09 pm

        My son didn’t buy this home years ago, he bought it months ago, an older home, but totally remodeled. He got a deal, but it was all remodeled. It’s over 1,000 sq. ft. I guess the way to go is to build you own.

  • Susan m February 23, 2015, 10:10 am

    Hello I am in georgia right now with no home staying with neighbors disabled from medicine field are you building in georgia could I get one ? Thank you for any info susan

  • jody April 1, 2015, 11:31 am

    Is it still available

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