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753 Sq. Ft. Modern Houseboat

This is a 753 square foot, two-bedroom houseboat built by Laust Nørgaard.

It was built for himself and his family and it’s located in the Copenhagen harbor.

Please enjoy, learn more, and re-share below. Thank you!

Family’s 753 Sq. Ft. Modern Houseboat

753 Sq Ft Modern HB Deck 001

Images © Anders Hviid

753 Sq Ft Modern HB Living Area 002

753 Sq Ft Modern HB Kitchen 003

753 Sq Ft Modern HB Bathroom 004

753 Sq Ft Modern HB Bedroom 005

Images © Anders Hviid

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Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 16 comments… add one }
  • Mouzaya Dabboussy August 8, 2016, 5:20 pm

    Love this!

  • ZACHARY E MOHRMANN August 8, 2016, 6:59 pm

    Unfortunately , sad to say, we have few builders of homes like this within the US, or at least right her in Florida anyway….! I would love to see more people living on the water as in other parts of the world , but the thing is can it be done and still respect the Eco system , and people remembering how fragile it really is….! That is the most important part of it… Probably not…! Sad to have to say that , but it is true no matter how we slice it….!

  • Michael August 8, 2016, 7:24 pm

    Zachary, very true. I guess in FL are more people living in RV and mobile home parks than on the water although we have plenty of it.

    I like the modern and simple design from Scandinavia and don’t get why almost none of American houseboat builders don’t have something like this in their portfolio.

    • Cindy August 8, 2016, 11:47 pm

      In the USA, we have more than our share of tornadoes, hurricanes, and windstorms. I suppose there are places on the planet that have a great deal of fair weather, making them conducive to water living in a houseboat. One storm is enough to send your houseboat hurling into the next century, especially on the eastern seaboard. I wonder if other countries have the storms we have, and if the houseboat owners don’t have to worry about losing everything in a storm. In addition, real estate in the USA is not in the water, but on land. I don’t know if you can occupy water spaces. Perhaps in some places that is possible. Great idea if the water is calm, waves will not overpower the houseboat, and you are not in a frequent frenzy to find a decent place to park your house. Some of these homes are built permanently in place, it appears. I’m just not sure our weather conditions allow such laid-back repose on a wide scale. Anyone know the answers?

      • Michael August 9, 2016, 8:27 am

        Cindy, I believe that FL is more exposed to bad weather as any other state in continental U.S.
        The bespoke type of houseboat isn’t suitable for coastal areas. But inland waterways like river, lake channels will do.
        A houseboat is independent from appearance a boat and get a registration and title. You canusually dock it where live aboard boats are allowed. You don’t pay property tax for a housebaot. Its more like a mobile home on the water.
        Hope it helps.

        • Comet August 9, 2016, 2:53 pm

          A common error here–you may not directly pay “Property tax” on anything. But–SOMEONE is paying that tax–on land; in the water—some one is cutting a check to the Tax Service. When you moor a houseboat you will be paying Dockage Fees (at the Coast or inland) to who ever owns the dock. You will also have to pay for shore power and water and waste dumpage. I am pretty sure that who ever owns the dock space will want to see insurance proof also to not risk their property.

          This bizarre notion that you can avoid ever paying “Property tax” while living somewhere is–childish; how do you think we pay for such things as roads; bridges, power grids, schools, social programs; our officials; in other words all infrastructure and the means to run it? Some one is paying and then you get a say on HOW it is run and what is built etc thru your vote. This is how society has agreed to do things. If you want to live in a lawless society there are several available–not a lot of peace or security available in those places tho.

  • Marilyn J Smith August 8, 2016, 7:45 pm

    I love the simple clean lines of this home.

  • Nancy August 8, 2016, 8:27 pm

    Love it!

  • Bonnie August 8, 2016, 8:54 pm

    My daughter intoduced me to Tiny Houses on HGTV. I absolutely love it!! I will someday own one. This particular househome is beautiful!! I want it…

  • Gail Banter August 9, 2016, 12:01 am

    Penthouse slash boathouse…mod, functional, light and airy, and so well appointed,, great rich ambiance…. Aye aye, Capitain!

  • Cheryl August 9, 2016, 4:04 am

    This is so beautiful I’d love to retire In a home like this👍👍👍

  • Large Marge August 9, 2016, 2:57 pm

    We dig the Yokohama Ono dart-board in the water-closet. A nice way to hone your pub skills while otherwise idle. Hilarious!

    We like the south-facing windows for winter sun, and minimizing north-side wall openings.

  • Roxanne August 10, 2016, 1:17 am

    I love the layout and design of this house. Wouldn’t it be nice if it were also on land?

  • jm August 10, 2016, 11:11 am

    What’s not to love about a houseboat? But I have friends who live on sailboats in Florida. Some anchored off-shore. They pay no property tax–but have the right to vote and impose new taxes on those who own property and DO pay property taxes. In urban cities– new school levies are always passed–voters who have no income, no property–and who will never have to spend a dime for imposing additional taxes on others. Maybe that’s why they are losing residents…? By the way–did you see all the tiny houses on wheels on this site? Are we to assume that they all pay property tax? Studies show that property taxes don’t even cover services like police, fire, trash. And, of course, evey town has to have all its mayors, etc at highly inflated wages. Does Cuyahoga County need so many ‘cities’ with all their mayors? Property taxes pay their salaries, teachers salaries, and just about it. Where I live 80% of property taxes go to the school board–and over 90% of that is spent on salaries and benefits. (Average salary is $90k+ for 9 months work, all health care paid for…) There isn’t enough money generated for roads and bridges. These are very expensive structures and yeah, look at the status of them in this country. Politicians don’t spend (vote) money when there is no payback for themselves. They are always put off for the next guy to deal with. Many parts of fla imposed additional impact fees to builders (like $10,000 or more) just for them to get a permit to build. Sometimes even passing moritoriums on all new building. (As I recall so fondly.)
    But plenty of polluted bodies of water already exist. Dig out a lake, put houseboats there–and see how long it takes living in their own sewage until they pass rules and laws preventing that!

    • Michael August 10, 2016, 6:47 pm

      jm, very true. Environmental protection and recovery is essential. FL as a boating state has essential regulation in place and they are enforced. The situation you have been describing is the result of these from former years and it will need plenty of time until nature will be as it has been before.

  • M. Hellman August 17, 2016, 10:03 am

    What is up with the plywood? Looks like they ran out of money to finish it. Otherwise fantastic.

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