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120 Sq. Ft. Tiny House on Wheels For Sale

This tiny house on wheels for sale is a guest post by Michael & Grace – share yours here!

This unique tiny portable studio was built as an additional bedroom but it can be used as an office, guest room, meditation nook, massage studio, vacation rental, or personal living space. It’s perfect for someone who wants privacy or their own inspirational space but doesn’t want the hassle of obtaining a permit to build. It was built by an incredibly gifted craftsman. Materials were carefully hand picked. We used it on our farm as our bedroom. It was nestled alongside the river during summer. We ran an extension cord from our barn for electricity. It was a wonderful relaxing retreat. Many people refer to our small space as a “sanctuary.” It’s a beauty.

This 8×16 handcrafted portable studio (120 square feet) sits sturdy on a double axle flatbed trailer made for us by Leonard. Non toxic products were selected and used for the inside from start to finish. We used all local wood. Poplar floors, handcrafted maple door with stain glass, non toxic insulation, american clay plaster walls (the plastered walls gives the studio a warm feeling), ceiling fan, cathedral ceilings, small loft for storage, passive solar energy efficient “Serious” Windows, wall electric heater, beautiful lighting features and excellent air flow with a window of each wall. Easy to hook up anywhere 110/120.

120 Sq. Ft. Tiny House on Wheels For Sale

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Images © Michael & Grace

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Images © Michael & Grace

This very unique special space has hardly been used and is in great condition. Since it is a studio it does not have a bathroom or kitchen. It was specifically built as a relaxing separate sleeping space and meditation room. Looking for someone who will cherish this creation as much as we did! It’s superb!

If you’re interested, it’s located in Asheville, North Carolina with an asking price of $30,000 $24,000. Please contact Grace and Michael at [email protected] or 540-319-8409. Thanks!

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Alex

Alex is a contributor and editor for TinyHouseTalk.com and the always free Tiny House Newsletter. He has a passion for exploring and sharing tiny homes (from yurts and RVs to tiny cabins and cottages) and inspiring simple living stories. We invite you to send in your story and tiny home photos too so we can re-share and inspire others towards a simple life too. Thank you!

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{ 33 comments… add one }
  • Deadrock July 31, 2015, 11:09 am

    I’m sure it’s very sturdily built, with some apparently nice artistic touches, but I have to question the price considering it’s really not much more than a wooden box. Even if the wood is good quality, I can’t see writing a check for $30,000, sorry!

    • Grace August 8, 2015, 9:50 pm

      You’re right it’s super sturdy. Our studio survived a “derecho” or land hurricane. It sat on a hill on our farm. When 90mph winds hit the farm; this studio was the only thing still intact. As I said in the ad it was built by a gifted craftsman. For the record it cost more than we’re asking.

  • Dswany July 31, 2015, 12:24 pm

    30K for a TinyHouse that has no bathroom or loft. WAY WAY to much!

    • Grace August 8, 2015, 9:55 pm

      We stayed in tiny houses before we built this studio and we discovered cooking, sleeping and eliminating in very small space just wasn’t fun. In addition we specifically didn’t want to travel up and down a loft in the middle of the night to go the bathroom. That’s why we designed it without a loft.

    • Grace August 8, 2015, 9:56 pm

      We specifically didn’t want to travel up and down a loft in the middle of the night to go the bathroom. Maybe it’s our age but going up and down steep steps in the middle of the night just didn’t appeal to us.

  • Lee July 31, 2015, 1:00 pm

    Agreed. That pricing makes absolutely no sense, even if you take the cost of the trailer and the materials and then doubled the price, you still would not arrive at $30K, and $30K can buy you a similarly sized new tiny house with plumbing and electric built in, though probably not with appliances. And in what world do you double the price on used items?

    • Grace August 9, 2015, 9:14 am

      For the record the materials cost $15,000 and labor another $15,000.

  • Anjmh July 31, 2015, 5:23 pm

    What makes a “house”? Even with multiple definitions, this is not a house….yet. It is a room. Make the room a house and your price tag will not draw the critical comments!

    • Grace August 9, 2015, 9:03 am

      I agree the ad read “studio.” Or better yet “sanctuary.”

  • Marsha Cowan July 31, 2015, 9:22 pm

    Ok…I’m usually defending prices on this site…but I just don’t see $30,000 worth of tiny house here. Sorry. It has potential, but only if a lot more money is spent to make it a home. I think $15,000 and that is a little high.

  • Catherine August 1, 2015, 12:07 am

    I really think Tiny Houses have gotten too much press!
    $30,000. For a 120 sq ft BOX??? With used mismatched windows? That’s $250.00 per square foot folks! Ha! Ha! Ha!
    Outrageous!!!

    • Grace August 8, 2015, 10:05 pm

      That’s an interesting opinion. I never thought of our windows as “mismatched.” Have you built a tiny? Wall space is crucial. The back window is that size mostly for privacy when undressing. The large side window in the photo with Buddha is for watching the night sky. The front window was placed at the desk for reflecting outside while writing. The other side window is for light. These windows are awesome in summer and make the studio tight and cozy in winter.

    • Grace August 9, 2015, 9:00 am

      Clearly you’ve never lived in a tiny. Wall space is tricky—and choosing the right kind of windows for views and fresh air is paramount. I’ve never thought of them mismatched—instead each one of them serve a specific purpose. The large casement window next to our bed provided awesome views of the stars at night and continual fresh air. The front window is great when sitting at the desk working, the back casement window gives privacy while undressing and the side window adds more sunlight. No need for blinds or curtains in this fabulous space. Spend sometime in a tiny and you’ll understand my choices.

  • Susanne August 1, 2015, 1:47 am

    Glad we are on the same page on the price! This is stressing me dearly at times!!!
    Wonder why they selling it if they enjoyed it so much?!

    • Grace August 9, 2015, 9:06 am

      As it says in the ad we travel often; the studio doesn’t get used as much as it should. In addition it was a wonderful life giving project and a wonderful asset on our farm.

  • Sandie moates August 1, 2015, 4:45 pm

    I’ll give you $6,000 and not a penny more!! There is not even close to $30,000 worth of material and labor in its tiny house!!!

  • offgrid carpenter August 1, 2015, 9:32 pm

    You all are clowns. Build one yourself and keep track of hours spent and materials used. You will come somewhat close to 30k with quality materials.

    • Deadrock August 3, 2015, 2:20 pm

      Well, if you build a box out of plywood, it’s bound to be a different price than one that’s built with gold inlay and lined with rare silks. However, when you try to sell your special golden box to people who are in the market for plywood because that’s what they’re interested in and what their budget runs to, you’re kind of wasting your time. Also, it doesn’t make any sense to people who are looking for a home to spend the same amount of money on an empty box, however goldy and silky, that would buy them twice the square footage, a complete bathroom (with plumbing, utilities and fixtures), kitchen (with electrical and all appliances), and some nice built ins – even if the finishes are not as high end.

    • Grace August 8, 2015, 7:00 pm

      Amen—someone who is gets quality, time and creativity. Thanks for your positive realistic comment.

    • Grace August 9, 2015, 9:11 am

      Thank you! Finally someone who intimately knows what is cost to hire someone to build something that will last. The materials alone cost $15,000.

  • Jackie August 2, 2015, 5:14 pm

    Some how the cost of tiny houses has gotten out of control. I loved them because of the freedom they have to potential to give us. But if you end up with a 15 yr debt,(as an example) where the freedom there. Just saying.

  • Tiana August 3, 2015, 4:52 am

    Very nicely done. An all-in-one sink/stove/fridge unit would fit nicely where the wicker whatsit is now. Close in a wall at the far end for bath on the back side and Murphy bed on the great room side, and TAKE OFF A ZERO FROM THE PRICE.

  • Deadrock August 3, 2015, 5:12 pm

    I think the public has spoken here. Just out of curiosity, I researched other sites where the sellers might be advertising this unit to see what others might have had to say about it, and I find that it’s been on the market just short of ONE YEAR (at least…possibly more), and in that time not only has everyone who has ever published a comment on it remarked on the overinflated price, but the sellers have in fact only RAISED the price during that time.

    This might be a case of someone desperately trying to not lose money on something they never should have spent so much for in the first place, but rather than resort to name calling as Offgrid Carpenter felt compelled to do (builder? seller? both?), I think we need to offer them our condolences and heartily suggest they do a reality check, offload this albatross, and move on…if poorer, then at least wiser.

    • Grace August 8, 2015, 9:58 pm

      Maybe it’s our age but going up and down steep steps in the middle of the night just didn’t appeal to us. We opted out of a loft for this reason.

  • Grace August 8, 2015, 10:07 pm

    That’s an interesting opinion. I never thought of our windows as “mismatched.” Have you built a tiny? Wall space is crucial. The back window is that size mostly for privacy when undressing. The large side window in the photo with Buddha is for watching the night sky. The front window was placed at the desk for reflecting outside while writing. The other side window is for light. These windows are awesome in summer and make the studio tight and cozy in winter.

  • Grace August 10, 2015, 6:05 pm

    In addition, I find it terribly disappointing when someone spends a lot of energy (researching our history) on something that “doesn’t” interest them. Rather than something that does. Maybe you need to evaluate your priorities.
    And yes, not knowing what to charge for our beautiful studio and with the advice of other tiny house owners who have been in our sanctuary we have tried different prices. Never intending to get what we put into it, but wanting more for someone to thrive in it as we did. Since we spend time out of the country we feel someone should benefit from using it more than we can.
    Shame on you for calling it an albatross. And finally I don’t know who the off grid carpenter is but he’s right; bunch of uniformed clowns commenting.

    • Deadrock August 10, 2015, 8:20 pm

      I think you meant to say “uninformed”, but then what do we know?

      Good luck finding the right person to enjoy your tiny…house. Maybe advertise in Audubon magazine?

    • jennifer September 1, 2015, 4:41 pm

      Obviously this place is special to you and you want it to be special to someone else. How about donating it to a person in need? Like a homeless vet, an elderly person that is about to get booted out of their lifelong home because they cant afford it anymore, an abused woman looking to start over on her own?I could go on and on. Just from reading all of the comments, I dont see any other way, if you’re not willing to lower the price considerably, then donate it, you get a tax write off and someone in need gets a home. 🙂 And if you are really thoughtful and considerate and generous, maybe help get a little bathroom and/or tiny kitchen added to it. Start a gofundme page to accept donations to add those things. Thats what I would do if it were mine 🙂

  • jennifer September 1, 2015, 4:32 pm

    ok so not to be a jerk, i checked out the American Clay website. EVEN using American Clay , the cost at most, per sq. ft. is $2.76. There is no way you’re going to convince a potential buyer that just because its American Clay rather than plywood that its worth $30k. Plywood sheets cost more than that. Im not trying to be mean, but I noticed you mentioned American Clay in reply to more than one comment, so I thought I would see what all the fuss was about. I am impressed by some of the features and benefits. The fact that it is made in the USA is top of the list for me. Thank you for sharing, 🙂

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